#1
So lately, for the past month now, the alternate picking excersize I got from a lick library DVD i've been practicing slow, and nothing but slow. My max speed is 82pbm (sixteenth note triplets) and I've never gone above 62bpm while practicing. I've read everywhere this is the correct way to do it. To drill your muscle contractions and finger placement into your brain for god knows how long, then speed it up. Or how you should practice near your top speed 1% of the time.

But how do I know when to finally go for speed again? Do I just pick a day out of the week to do that? Or do I do it at least once a day? I'm a little confused when it comes to this concept.

And i've realized that this, along with a sweep picking excersize, are the only two things i've been practicing. So, i'm getting another lick library DVD. The advanced blues in six weeks program. I LOVE their DVDs....and along with metal and rock, I want to get into blues, so I figure this will be good for me.

But does this practice regimen sound right?
#2
This regimen will work, but it'll do a lot better if you bear this in mind: your goal should be relaxation and economy of motion. Speed will come in time, but it'll come faster as long as you aren't chasing beats per minute.
#3
Everyone says practice slow but you won't get speed unless you push yourself to play faster. The main thing is to practice slow if you believe your playing the exercise poorly. Then push yourself again when your back on track.

I tend to play exercises at 75% of the exercise's normal speed, and then I'll play at 150% (which will be impossible to play accurately) of the normal speed. The point is I use 75% speed for accuracy and 150% for building up speed. Eventually when I start to have difficulty playing at 75% because it's too slow and tedious then I'll play at 100% normal speed.

I switch between the two speeds every few minutes, if you spend a whole day playing at one speed then your just burning that speed into your brain permanently. So if you're practicing at 70% of the normal speed for the whole day then that's the speeds your going to get good at. You should only practice these kinds of exercises for long periods when you've nailed them down 100% and can play them up to speed with full accuracy. Otherwise they're best played for thirty minutes two or three times a day.
#4
Quote by Geldin
This regimen will work, but it'll do a lot better if you bear this in mind: your goal should be relaxation and economy of motion. Speed will come in time, but it'll come faster as long as you aren't chasing beats per minute.


This. I have always found that when i strive for something to sound clean and accurate, and being relaxed while doing it helps me more for developing speed than actually focusing on speed.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

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#5
Well there should come a time when you just fill that you are comfortable with greater speeds.
There is also an aproach called 'speed bursts' where you practice usual slow tempo for say 8 bars than give it a sudden speed burst for a bar or two where you play it double tempo.
Google for 'speed bursts guitar'