stuntman133
terrible musician
Join date: Mar 2011
160 IQ
#1
Hi there, guys (and gals).

I was wondering if the dwellers of this forum can educate me on what makes a bass...well, good and worth the money spent. 'Cause half the time when I read guitar catalogues, I have no idea what the hell it's about (Maple fretboard? Rosewood body?? Triple humbucker jazz pickups??? sdfsdfsdfsf).

brb making a same thread in the drum section


EDIT: Oh, and if possible, could you explain on bass amps/cabs/combos/God-knows-whats? I can't seem to know a good amp from a shit one.
Last edited by stuntman133 at Oct 15, 2013,
BL1NDSIDE-J
Banned
Join date: Dec 2010
1,401 IQ
#2
To me the best bass/amp combo is the one that sounds the best for the money you invest. I've heard some bad ass bass amps that were surprising considering the cost. You should really just play around with everything you can get your hands on. Basically if it sounds good to you then thats the right combo. Try not to buy into all the hype about the newest trick on the market and keep it simple also.
Last edited by BL1NDSIDE-J at Oct 16, 2013,
stuntman133
terrible musician
Join date: Mar 2011
160 IQ
#4
Actually, I'm more into wondering what gives a bass/amp-thing it's characteristics, like for example:

- what's the difference between a 50W amp and a 100W one (it's probably something pretty obvious)
- which wood used for it's body/fretboard/neck will produce what kinda sound
- what pickups/strings will produce what kinda sound

I'm not so worried about getting anything yet since...they cost really expensive where I'm at...*sniff*

EDIT: Probably should've explain this in the OP...sorry for any confusion caused.
Last edited by stuntman133 at Oct 16, 2013,
DeathByDestroyr
EDM
Join date: Oct 2008
953 IQ
#5
Wattage is a reference to headroom, not volume. You're going to want a lot of wattage so your bass tonez don't squish when you're rocking with a drummer.

The best bass is one that feels good. I'm happy enough with my Silvertone and GK RB400. That being said, I'm not a bassist, I just have one for when I want to pretend to be a bassist.

Is anyone ACTUALLY a bassist?
Mind_Reader7
Tab Contributor
Join date: Aug 2008
1,537 IQ
#6
Quote by DeathByDestroyr
I'm not a bassist, I just have one for when I want to pretend to be a bassist.

Is anyone ACTUALLY a bassist?
top lel
"I think, as a musician, you should practice your technique to be as good as you need to be to facilitate whatever ideas come into your head."
- Devin Townsend
CorrosionMedia
Almost Sane
Join date: Nov 2011
1,352 IQ
#7
I'm a Bassist and a "guitar player". There is a difference

1. Death got it right
2. Similar to guitars, Mahogany is darker, maple is brighter. Check Warmoth. They have charts.
3. P-Style pickups have a good band-filling sound, J-style pickups have a more defined tone and MM humbuckers have a very "precise" growl. Soapbars are somewhere between Js and MMs

Any more questions?
stuntman133
terrible musician
Join date: Mar 2011
160 IQ
#8
Quote by CorrosionMedia
Any more questions?


No, sir.
Also, have we met? I felt like I saw an account with the same username as yours on edmDistrict or something...

Ziphoblat
The Enigma
Join date: Jun 2010
390 IQ
#10
Quote by atza
well to me..unless you are really pro and/or really good at bass there is no much difference between 150$ replica or 3000$ original of say fender jazz bass


...

Quote by DeathByDestroyr
Is anyone ACTUALLY a bassist?


Not in this thread, apparently.
Spare a Cow
Eat a Vegan
DeathByDestroyr
EDM
Join date: Oct 2008
953 IQ
#11
Quote by atza
well to me..unless you are really pro and/or really good at bass there is no much difference between 150$ replica or 3000$ original of say fender jazz bass


Who spends $3000 on a bass anyways?

You could buy a real guitar for that much.
damienbass
Registered User
Join date: May 2012
21 IQ
#12
Quote by DeathByDestroyr
Who spends $3000 on a bass anyways?

You could buy a real guitar for that much.



Couldn't this be said for a guitar as well?

@Bl1ndside: You are completely right about the hype. Sometimes it's what you don't hear about that will surprise you. I have 3 amps by 3 different companies. My Acoustic Amp (600 w solid state) tries to match the Ampeg but fails. A lot of quirks with the tone controls and mine hums when I start turning up the high knob. My Bugera amp is a 550w amp is really tricky on the fly. If I'm playing through an amp, I have total control of my amp but the gain knob is very tricky, to little and its almost mute. Too much and it distorts. If I plug it into a PA, I lose control of everything but my gain and my EQ. Everything else.. gone. My SWR 400w solid state is my best amp. I have tonal control in the PA but have to select if I'm going through the PA or my cabinets. If I'm playing a small club, I just crank my Speakers. Dont need much more.

@atza: As your ear develops, you'll hear huge differences between a replica, a lower model, and a top shelf model of the Fender Jazz.

@stuntman: Corrosion got it right. Check warmoth for the full skinny. Strings: Round strings are a little punchier than flats and flats are warmer. Thickness only means that you can tune down more for different tunings. Anything after D.. Just get a 5 string. The less songs that I have to drop D for, the more I can play along.
My Gear. Guitar
ESP LTD MH417 7-string
Epiphone Goth Les Paul


Bass:
Ibanez SR 756
Ibanez BTB 676
Ziphoblat
The Enigma
Join date: Jun 2010
390 IQ
#13
Quote by DeathByDestroyr
Who spends $3000 on a bass anyways?

You could buy a real guitar for that much.


Or a lifetimes supply of fish oil, supposed to increase brain performance.
Spare a Cow
Eat a Vegan
MaggaraMarine
Slapping the bass.
Join date: Oct 2009
3,411 IQ
#14
What makes a good bass? Well, one that feels good to play. And sounds good to your ears. The most common bass types are Jazz, Precision and Music Man. They all have their own kind of tone (just like Stratocaster, Les Paul and Telecaster). And it's all about which of the tones you like. All Jazz Basses will sound like Jazz Bass, same as all Strats will sound like Strat, no matter if it's a cheap copy or the real thing.

Amps... Well, you want to have enough wattage because you want your bass to sound clean and more wattage means cleaner tones at higher volumes. And of course different amps sound different. You just need to try them and buy the one you prefer.

Here's a video of common bass types:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DFjA0cshhvc
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Charvel So Cal
Ibanez Blazer
Yamaha FG720S-12
Tokai TB48
Laney VC30
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Tostitos
caffeinated
Join date: Jan 2009
868 IQ
#15
Quote by atza
well to me..unless you are really pro and/or really good at bass there is no much difference between 150$ replica or 3000$ original of say fender jazz bass

Not being able to tell the difference is a simple matter of experience. If you play enough basses, over time you'll come to appreciate a higher level of build quality and precision, quality electronics, and top shelf hardware. The laws of diminishing returns do apply, but there is a world of difference between a $150 starter pack Squier and a top of the line Fender/boutique Fender clone.

Quote by DeathByDestroyr
Is anyone ACTUALLY a bassist?

If you have to ask this, you're in the wrong thread.

Quote by DeathByDestroyr
Who spends $3000 on a bass anyways?

You could buy a real guitar for that much.

Because people like nice things. And basses are the nicest things one could possibly acquire. Therefore, investing in a nice bass is a win-win. Why would you want to spend that money on a silly little twiddly guitar instead?

Quote by CorrosionMedia
2. Similar to guitars, Mahogany is darker, maple is brighter. Check Warmoth. They have charts.
3. P-Style pickups have a good band-filling sound, J-style pickups have a more defined tone and MM humbuckers have a very "precise" growl. Soapbars are somewhere between Js and MMs

2. Maybe try "warmer." "Darker" is like the most ambiguous term to use there in describing the characteristics of tone wood. Spot on about Warmoth having a good basic breakdown though.

3. Soapbars sound like whatever pickup is crammed in there. "Soapbar" just refers to the shape and dimensions of the pickup's shell. Soapbars can be single coil, humbuckers, split coils. The EMG 35, 40, and 45 series are a great example of all kinds of different pickup configurations crammed into a standard sized shell.

Quote by Ziphoblat
Or a lifetimes supply of fish oil, supposed to increase brain performance.
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
anarkee
oh the horror!
Join date: Aug 2006
3,136 IQ
#16
Quote by DeathByDestroyr
Who spends $3000 on a bass anyways?

You could buy a real guitar for that much.


warned for trolling
CorrosionMedia
Almost Sane
Join date: Nov 2011
1,352 IQ
#17
Quote by Tostitos

2. Maybe try "warmer." "Darker" is like the most ambiguous term to use there in describing the characteristics of tone wood. Spot on about Warmoth having a good basic breakdown though.



That is basically what I meant, but for some reason, the word escaped me lol
atza
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2007
57 IQ
#19
@ "@atza: As your ear develops, you'll hear huge differences between a replica, a lower model, and a top shelf model of the Fender Jazz."

I believe so, but in the final mix they all sound the same don't they? At least in pop/rock music
Ziphoblat
The Enigma
Join date: Jun 2010
390 IQ
#20
Quote by atza
@ "@atza: As your ear develops, you'll hear huge differences between a replica, a lower model, and a top shelf model of the Fender Jazz."

I believe so, but in the final mix they all sound the same don't they? At least in pop/rock music


The same can be said for a most electric instruments (guitar included). It's only acoustic instruments like drums where you're going to notice a difference in sound quality in the final mix. But you don't just pay for the sound; it's the whole aesthetic; the way it feels, how effortlessly it plays, etc etc. I might not get a vastly better sound in the mix out of a well made instrument versus a poorly made one, but I'll damn well give a better performance.

EDIT: And I'm talking purely about different takes on the same design (Squier Jazz versus Fender Jazz etc) here. There's a definite noticeable difference in sound between different types of design, even in the context of a mix, and if you can't hear that then it's your ears unfortunately.
Spare a Cow
Eat a Vegan
Last edited by Ziphoblat at Oct 18, 2013,
MaggaraMarine
Slapping the bass.
Join date: Oct 2009
3,411 IQ
#21
Quote by Ziphoblat
The same can be said for a most electric instruments (guitar included). It's only acoustic instruments like drums where you're going to notice a difference in sound quality in the final mix. But you don't just pay for the sound; it's the whole aesthetic; the way it feels, how effortlessly it plays, etc etc. I might not get a vastly better sound in the mix out of a well made instrument versus a poorly made one, but I'll damn well give a better performance.

EDIT: And I'm talking purely about different takes on the same design (Squier Jazz versus Fender Jazz etc) here. There's a definite noticeable difference in sound between different types of design, even in the context of a mix, and if you can't hear that then it's your ears unfortunately.

True. It's not about how it sounds like on the record (because everything can be made sound good with enough processing). It is how it sounds to you when you play it. And there's a noticeable difference between different instruments when you play them. Recorded sounds don't tell everything. Recorded sound is not the same as if you play the instrument by yourself.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Charvel So Cal
Ibanez Blazer
Yamaha FG720S-12
Tokai TB48
Laney VC30
Hartke HyDrive 210c
stuntman133
terrible musician
Join date: Mar 2011
160 IQ
#22
Wow, thank you all for the replies! I'll give 'em a good read when I have the time.
And God dammit, if my internet fails again, I'll perform a German Suplex on a kitten.
realsmoky
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2013
839 IQ
#23
If you can sell it back for money, than it's worth the money. Obviously.

In terms of tradeability the best basses are Fender and Squier ones because they can come and go really fast.


It's a different thing if you want a good bass for the sake of keeping and playing it. Then don't buy fender or squier. Buy Ibanez, Musicman or Aria.
Ziphoblat
The Enigma
Join date: Jun 2010
390 IQ
#24
Quote by realsmoky
It's a different thing if you want a good bass for the sake of keeping and playing it. Then don't buy fender or squier. Buy Ibanez, Musicman or Aria.


...
Spare a Cow
Eat a Vegan
realsmoky
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2013
839 IQ
#25
Quote by Ziphoblat
...

Sadly, I am not a Fender fanboy and I don't think that they are 'the tight shit' like most people do. Maybe they were 20 years ago or so...
Ziphoblat
The Enigma
Join date: Jun 2010
390 IQ
#26
Quote by realsmoky
Sadly, I am not a Fender fanboy and I don't think that they are 'the tight shit' like most people do. Maybe they were 20 years ago or so...


That's perfectly fine, and you're entitled to your opinion. Don't, however, impose it upon others. "I personally prefer the sound/feel of bass X to bass Y" is stellar, however stating as if it were fact "bass X is better than bass Y" when it is based entirely upon subjectivity serves to do little but spread misinformation.
Spare a Cow
Eat a Vegan
anarkee
oh the horror!
Join date: Aug 2006
3,136 IQ
#27
Quote by Ziphoblat
That's perfectly fine, and you're entitled to your opinion. Don't, however, impose it upon others. "I personally prefer the sound/feel of bass X to bass Y" is stellar, however stating as if it were fact "bass X is better than bass Y" when it is based entirely upon subjectivity serves to do little but spread misinformation.


This. The only reason I will steer people away from a bass is due to bad builds or shoddy electronics reputation. I'm not a warwick fangirl, but there are tonnes of people on this forum who love them Different basses for different players. Which is why I always tell people to set a budget for an instrument and then try everything they can in that price range.
Spanner93
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2012
333 IQ
#28
Quote by realsmoky
Sadly, I am not a Fender fanboy and I don't think that they are 'the tight shit' like most people do. Maybe they were 20 years ago or so...


Agreed, IMO Fender haven't made a decent product in the last 15 years and anything with a squier logo is piss poor. That said it is just personal preference and is subjective at best. There are plenty of people on any forum that hate/love any particular brand, for example: The most hated bass brand on this forum is Rickenbacker, wheras I personally love the 4001.

As was previously said, the best bass is the one that you're comfortable with. And the best amp is the one that'll drown the drummer out and give you the tone you want. At best any advice on this forum is exactly that, advice. The level of bias will vary, but ultimately buying gear and understanding the bass is all about experience and playing as much gear as possible.
Quote by Karl Marx
Reason has always existed, but not always in a reasonable form.