#1
I wouldn't consider myself a beginner but I'm no where near good at the guitar. One of my main goals is learning to improvise. I just want to be able to start up and random jam track and play along with it. It just seems that I can't find anywhere that really explains how I should go about starting to learn what's required for this! If anyone has an explanation or some recommendations to help me learn to improvise please let me know!! Thanks, Chris.
#2
In order to do that you need to develop your ear and learn some basic music theory. You need to identify the key the backing track is in so you can improvise over it.

You should start by learning Major and Minor scale, and learn how to construct chords. Also great thing to do for your ear is to sing along as you practice going up and down the scale.
#3
I would highly recommend you watch this whole clinic, split up in 2 parts and a total of 1 and a half hours. Guthrie govan is a great improviser of all styles and is a man whoms words you can trust.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IHZ0-IDI2GY&list=PLOsR6tSWz_PzTbK9AwgPHBKzy2HnNfU0m

I could of course go on and ramble about things that would help you, but i don't think i can do a better job then Guthrie.

Hope that answers your questions.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#4
Quote by BadCo55
I wouldn't consider myself a beginner but I'm no where near good at the guitar. One of my main goals is learning to improvise. I just want to be able to start up and random jam track and play along with it. It just seems that I can't find anywhere that really explains how I should go about starting to learn what's required for this! If anyone has an explanation or some recommendations to help me learn to improvise please let me know!! Thanks, Chris.



A find that alot of people don't have the patience and/or have too big of an ego to get through the beginning phases. In an attempt to bypass beginnerdom, they go to the internet and look for step by step instructions on how to be awesome at guitar. Truth is, it never works.

All great guitarists were beginners 1st


I suggest lessons, and patience.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Oct 16, 2013,
#6
Stickz, thanks a lot! I haven't finished watching him yet, but already I can tell that the videos might be a great help!
#7
Quote by BadCo55
Stickz, thanks a lot! I haven't finished watching him yet, but already I can tell that the videos might be a great help!


No worries!

Guthrie and Victor Wooten (amazing bass player) are probably the two musicians that have explained it in the best way in my opinion. If you want music to feel natural to you, like your first language, you have to treat it as such. Learning by trying to emulate.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#8
We teach this. It's part of our Lead Guitar Phase 1.

Essentially, you're on the right track, it's about a key, and then once you've defined that key, whether Major or Minor, then to have the skill sets to apply to that key. Most of Lead Guitar Phase 1 starts with establishing those skill sets and then teaches how to discern the key of a song (without anyone there to even tell you the chords, or having sheet music or any other clues) so that you can apply that idea, exactly as you said, starting anywhere, meaning if you you decide that the key is Eb and want to start it on the 3rd string, you can do that and not be at a loss as to where to go next...that kind of thing.

Best,

Sean
#9
There's so much to say on how to develop your improv skills but to keep my post simple I'll just tell you some good concepts to dive into. Yes, you need to learn your basic major and minor scales and develop your ear and all that. More importantly, you need a way to apply concepts and put them to practice rather than just knowing what the concepts are. Look into the CAGED system, triads, harmonized scales, key signatures, rhythmic exercises, chord construction, scale sequences, pentatonic and extended pentatonic scales, chord substitution and arpeggios. All that stuff alone could hold you over for months. Look into some of these concepts and see how you can incorporate them into your playing. Learn other peoples licks/riffs and mess with them to make them your own as well. If you learn an A minor pentatonic scale then just try and jam over an A minor backing track on Youtube with it. If you want some specific exercises on a particular concept let me know.
#10
Marty Friedman's "Melodic Control" is a great video for improv tips.

The best way to get good at improvising is to improvise a lot. Record yourself and give/get honest criticism. Find out what you are good at, what sounds stiff, what you need to work on, what motifs you should keep using. You just have to do it- there's no magic. It's a skill like anything else when playing guitar.
Isolation is a gift. All the others are a test of your endurance.