#1
My Floyd Rose isn't parallel to my guitar, but I never use it so I want to know, why is it so important ?
#2
You mean flat alongside the body? Intonation mostly. Is it leaning forward or are the springs pulling it towards the bottom? I can't imagine it's in tune very well.
Harmony: Stratocaster
Alvarez: F-200
Schecter: Omen 6
Fender: BXR-60
Dean: Metalman Z Bass (Betty)
Egnator: Tweaker 15
Pearl: Maximum
ESP/LTD: EXP-300
Custom: Harley Quinn Bass
Custom: TK-421 Explorer
A steadily growing supply of pedals
#3
Parallel means the springs are adjusted optimally and the Floyd only acts as a lever from the bridge end, and not the string end. Think of it this way: if the Floyd is parallel, increasing the string tension from the fret side cannot pull the Floyd out of tune easily, because it is pulling straight backwards. If it is not parallel, the Floyd acts like a lever and you can pull it up or down and throw your notes and chords out of tune when you only want to bend one note. It's like trying to knock a person down: you don't press on their head, you push them from the side. If your floyd is parallel, all that force is on their head (in our analogy) and they won't fall as readily, unless they want to (which is you pulling on the bar in our analogy).

If you never use your Floyd, just block it. Then it won't move at all, and you won't have to worry about it. There are plenty of guides online, it's very easy.
#4

It's like this, but my guitar is tuned almost perfectly

Blocking it can be a good idea, thanks !
Last edited by ulqui84 at Oct 16, 2013,
#5
Tuning, intonation, and tuning stability are separate things, it's not just tuning you need to worry about. It might still be just fine in all of those categories, but you might as well block it if you never use it.
#7
If it's pulled forward you are shortening the string length, thus messing up your intonation. Even a tiny bit matters as far as intonation goes.
#8
Quote by Roc8995
Parallel means the springs are adjusted optimally and the Floyd only acts as a lever from the bridge end, and not the string end. Think of it this way: if the Floyd is parallel, increasing the string tension from the fret side cannot pull the Floyd out of tune easily, because it is pulling straight backwards.


Um, no. Not puzzackly, anyway.

If you have light strings and fairly light spring tension (say, two springs), you'll find that a good bend will raise a perfectly parallel Floyd with no problems at all, forcing the rest of the strings flat.

His Floyd is not parallel to the body because (usually) he hasn't taken the spring cavity cover off and screwed in the spring claw far enough. There are instructions with accompanying YouTube videos out there that will tell you the best way to get everything set up, quickly and easily. Most Floyds increase the action height when they tilt forward *and* they change the string length slightly, so it's better to have it parallel.
#9
It was a simplification, he said he doesn't even use the floyd. The short version seemed good enough for these purposes.
#10
Quote by Roc8995
It was a simplification, he said he doesn't even use the floyd. The short version seemed good enough for these purposes.


And you are puzzackly correct, my good sir.
I just left the other answer for whomever might happen on the conversation who was NOT the OP.