#1
Alright so I want to know the best solution for curing raw fingers from excessive jamming on an acoustic? Especially my ring finger which bends most freq, it feels quite numb and when seen at different angles it seems as thoe a portion was shaved off. That is, due to the callous that I played right off my finger until it practically droped to the floor. Either way I've been playing through it nonstop practically jamming around 4-5 hours a day so it makes sense however I am unsure of the most efficient way to keep it from only worsening . I know rubbing alcohol somewhat works as well. I've been playing for 7 years.

Then again maybe I could just play to the bone and I wont have to worry about these problems anymore.
#2
You may try taking a break from playing a day or two. Or getting a lighter gauge string, but beware if you change strings it may have an effect on your fretboard and the neck might have to be readjusted for those strings. If its steel string guitar, maybe buy a nylon string or an electric guitar to also play because those strings/guitars are easier on the fingers. An electric will feel weird but so easy. An amplified steel string acoustic will allow to turn up the volume and jam without playing so hard. When I started 30 years ago, I had a warped neck Sear's special acoustic guitar that seemed to have about a 4 gauge set of strings. My fingers hurt so bad, but hang in there it will go away. I have 1/4 in. callous on my fingers. I created some bad habits I still have today Playing hard can lead to playing sloppy. I have to try hard not to play with an iron grip. My wife will complain that I'm crushing her hand when I hold it. I think I'm just barely clutching her hand. So this is bad because it can limit your speed moving around the neck and after playing a short time your hand will feel like it's seizing up and you may end up with arthritis. Last, when you can, place your fingers, whether bar chord or single notes close to the fretbar. You wont have to press as hard to make it sound. If you have an old guitar hold the 1 st string on the first fretbar and then on the same string on the 15 or 17 th fretbar. Look and see how much distance is between the the string and the fretbar halfway between those two you are holding down. Do this on the 6 th string also. It should lay evenly across those all the frets if it's not your guitar neck needs adjusting. I mention this because if the strings are high of the fretboard in the middle you have to press down harder causing it to cut more into your fingers.
A little 1980's shredder trick, I know for a fact Steve Vai does it. His guitars are specially made where the fretboard is raised in between the frets thus he doesn't have to press down as hard to play the note. One reason he makes it look so easy.
Little advice, concentrate on pressing as lightly as possible but still getting a good sound even on the bends. If you don't you'll regret it later. Lighter strings probably will be my best guess to help you. Maybe put some finger nail enamel on your finger tips to harden them, but it may unintentionally sound the strings when you are moving around the neck.
Also, if you gonna shred on an acoustic for that long its gonna shred your fingers even with callouses. Hey you may want to check out the music of Andy McKee or Antoine Dufour. They are crazy good and it will show you an awesome side of the acoustic guitar that doesn't involve shredding your fingers on the guitar.
Last edited by jspires at Oct 21, 2013,
#3
Quote by jspires

A little 1980's shredder trick, I know for a fact Steve Vai does it. His guitars are specially made where the fretboard is raised in between the frets thus he doesn't have to press down as hard to play the note. One reason he makes it look so easy.


I think you mean the fretboard is "lowered" in between the frets, such as by using a scalloped fretboard, so the frets are even higher than the fretboard, which makes it easier to play with a lighter touch. Just be sure to indeed use a light touch, otherwise your notes will go sharp if you press too hard and vertically bend the string relative to the fretboard.

Instead of scalloping, which permanently changes the fretboard, you can also have a guitar tech install larger frets, such as bass guitar frets, to achieve the same results. If you don't like it, you can have the tech change them back.