#1
How do I count this while playing?

I know quarter notes are counted as "one and", 8th are counted as "one and uh", and 16ths are counted as "one ee and uh".

So here in the first bar; we have a 8th, 16ths. So how do I count out the whole thing? (verbally)
Last edited by TrainerHibiki at Oct 18, 2013,
#3
This is they way I would instinctively count it Not sure whether it will be helpful though


But I would definitely take supersac's advice and treat each 8th note as two 16th note in counting. Metronomes are also the way.

I don't recommend many books to anyone ever, but I just took one out the library called "Encyclopedia of Reading Rhythms" by Gary Hess. It's ridiculous, just slash notation with different rhythms and counting strategies forever, staring from the super basic to crazyland. If you're looking to improve your counting and rhythm reading, I'd think that's a good place.
#4
I will also advise you to count everything as you would 16th-notes.
Also...this is a tricky syncopated example...so pay attention when you're playing the "chords" on the off beat that crosses over to the next bar.
I'd probably advise against UnmagicMushrooms counting, since it implies a polymeter, which will just make your life more confusing. Definitely not calling it wrong though

Depending on what the rhythm section does, it can get really confusing unless they all follow the same pattern...in which case this isn't really a standard 4/4...
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#6
Quote by atza
Basicall that's what called gallop rhythm because it remindsof the sound that a horse is making when galloping

Nowhere near answering the question....unless you want him to count it as ga-llo-pp-2-llo-pp-3-llo-pp, which would be very strange!
Things with strings:
Ibanez J.Custom, Prestiges, RG8, SR5 bass etc
LP's, Strat, Tele
Noiseboxes:
ENGL Retro Tube 50
5150 III 50W
Orange Terror Bass
#7
I personally use a version of the takadimi system, giving a word for each note grouping.

For example:

(Using "-" to seperate each beat)
Whole note: Ta - a - a - a
Half note: Ta - a - Ta - a
Quarter note: Ta - Ta - Ta - Ta
Eight notes: Ta di - ta di - ta di - Ta di
Sixteenth notes: Ta ka di mi - Ta ka di mi - Ta ka di mi - Ta ka di mi.

So for groupings that are a mixure, like the eight and 2 sixteenth notes in, i would count it "Ta (ka) di mi" keeping the "ka" silent.

If you like this idea i'd suggest you read up on it. There is tons of information on it, google is your friend. Just keep in mind there are different versions of it that use different words for different groupings. Find a version that works for you.
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#9
Quote by TrainerHibiki
How do I count this while playing?

I know quarter notes are counted as "one and", 8th are counted as "one and uh", and 16ths are counted as "one ee and uh".

So here in the first bar; we have a 8th, 16ths. So how do I count out the whole thing? (verbally)


I'd say get a metronome and put it at a slow tempo for starters. We'll say 60 bpm in 4/4. A simple way to count this using the 1 e a uh method for sixteenth notes:

Subdivide/count the 16th notes like this: 1 e and uh 2 e and uh 3 e and uh 4 e and uh
Bar 1
Play or clap on these beats - 1 and uh 2 and uh 3 and uh 4 e and

Bar 2
Play or clap on these beats - and uh 2 and uh 3 and uh 4 and

Bar 3
Play or clap on these beats - 3 and and

Bars 2 and 3 might seem kind of strange but because there are ties that's how you would count them. Do you understand what the ties do?