#1
I think the right term for this is fretting out. When I try to play one and a half step bends on the high E string on my electric, the note will not sound. What is the solution for this? Heighten the action? I think it's already pretty high. Maybe it's the guitar? Thanks
#2
My first guess would have been the action, but if it is already high then maybe your truss rod is not set up correctly?
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#3
what guitar is it?
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#4
Are your frets worn down in certain areas? If you're bending on a fret that's worn down, the string sliding on the lower, worn fret can then buzz against the the higher, non-worn fret.
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#5
It's pretty new so no worn frets. A fender modern jazzmaster. If the truss rod needs adjustment, then is it a DIY job or a good idea to take it to someone. I don't have any experience working on guitars, just electrical experience with soldering.
#6
Quote by sweetdude3000
It's pretty new so no worn frets. A fender modern jazzmaster. If the truss rod needs adjustment, then is it a DIY job or a good idea to take it to someone. I don't have any experience working on guitars, just electrical experience with soldering.


Well, checking to see if the truss rod is an issue is really easy. Hold down the low E string at the 1st and last fret at the same time. Look at the gap between the string and top of the 8th fret while doing this. This gap should be about 0.01" or the thickness of the high E string. If the gap is too large OR there is no gap it could be a truss rod issue.
#7
Quote by demonhellcat
Well, checking to see if the truss rod is an issue is really easy. Hold down the low E string at the 1st and last fret at the same time. Look at the gap between the string and top of the 8th fret while doing this. This gap should be about 0.01" or the thickness of the high E string. If the gap is too large OR there is no gap it could be a truss rod issue.


Good information. Thanks for the response.
#8
which jazzmaster is it? trying to figure out what the neck radius is, lol.

personally i'd say fiddling with the trussrod is easier than soldering, but that's just me. you just need to be careful/sensible and not turn the thing too far- if in doubt, turn it less than you need, and normally you're only turning it the slightest amount, kind of thing. the dan erlewine setup book is pretty good; alternatively there's a setup thread in EG if you want to post in there to ask about it.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#9
If you've got a really round radius (7.25", etc.), the problem can be the radius.

Otherwise, your frets may not be level. I have a guitar that fretted out when I did a two-stop bend on the 16th fret. Took it to Gary Brawer, had the frets leveled (PLEK machine) and now the action is VERY low and I can bend anywhere on the neck with no danger of fretting out.