#1
I'm gonna take a second to be sure this time since last time I asked here I miscounted and the answer was obvious heh...

Here's the tab

E|-----0-----0-----0-----0--0------
B|-----0-----0-----0-----0--0------
G|-----0-----0-----0-----0--0------
D|-----2-----4-----5-----7--9------
A|-----3-----5-----7-----9--10----
E|-------------------------------------

I thought I used C, D, Em, F#m, G

but after not finding out what scale that was, I began typing the chords into http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/chord_name.php I found that the chords were really Cmaj7, Em9, Em, G maj13(no 5th), Em

now uhm...what the heck is G maj13(no 5th)? Before anyone laughs and points, I'm prety sure the answer's easy heh. I just never heard of a scale degree being excluded from a chord. is this a common thing?
Theory is just...wow. I'm getting a bit over my head by trying to learn so much w/o formal educators

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#2
yeah you can pretty much play whatever notes you want

on more complex chords like that it's pretty common to leave out notes like that to make them easy to finger. on the more complex ones they could well have more than 6 notes in the full chord, so they'd be impossible to finger on a regular 6-string guitar anyway.

EDIT: just to expand on that a little, while you can play whichever notes you want, you can't just willy nilly stop playing random notes in a chord and expect it to be necessarily the same chord. for example, like in your example, the 5th is often omitted because it doesn't change the overall sound of the chord. If you were playing, say, G13, you can't omit the 13 (unless other instruments who are playing with you are playing the 13) because then it wouldn't be G13 any more, it'd be G11 (assuming you were playing all the other required notes of the original G13 chord).

as a rough rule of thumb you don't want to remove any of the notes within the chord which give the chord its flavour- assuming you want to maintain the chord's flavour, that is.
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Last edited by Dave_Mc at Oct 18, 2013,
#3
Honestly, I don't necessarily see this as a progression of chords with such complicated extensions: it looks and sounds like a melody (paired thirds, in this case) moving against a static Em on the upper strings. The whole this is Em -> Em -- or at most Cmaj7 -> Em -- with some passing tones...

...which probably doesn't make any more sense to you than a Gmaj13(no5). :c
You might could use some double modals.
Last edited by AETHERA at Oct 18, 2013,
#4
Cmaj7 - D - Em - D/F# - G

The open strings in your tab act as pedals, creating tension notes with the chords. Play the progression I've given you and it will sound correct, as this is the basic harmony minus the open strings.

Get a bass player to play the root of each chord I've given you while you play your tab in the OP.

D/F#

-2
-3
-2
-
-
-2
#5
Fifths are dropped a lot. My old music teacher would purposefully not use fifths as he just didn't like them.
after the fifth, the root is dropped.
You need the third.
You only need to keep the fifth if it's specefied in the chord (as in, say, Gm7b5, spelled G Bb Db A)
#6
Well it is kinda a melody as it's playing over the main progression. I use it at the end about 3 times before jumping into the exiting riff and progression.

Anyway, thanks guys. I never thought that removing a note could leave the flavor in. I just played this with the 5th and it just needlessly complicated everything
Theory is just...wow. I'm getting a bit over my head by trying to learn so much w/o formal educators

Quote by DBKGUITAR
To be a good lead guitar you must be VERY GOOD AT RYTHM

Quote by MaggaraMarine
My motto: Play what the song needs you to play!
#7
Quote by eric_wearing
I found that the chords were really Cmaj7, Em9, Em, G maj13(no 5th), Em

Yes, that's technically correct. Here's why:
Cmaj7 = C, E, G, B; Em9 = E, G, B, D, F#; Em = E, G, B; Gmaj13(no 5th) = G, B, E, A.

However, I think the chords actually function best in the manner that mdc mentioned. So, taking that into account (and including "pedals notes" as intervals within the chords because I can), I would call this progression:
Cmaj7, Dadd6/9, Em, Gmaj13(No 5th)/F#, & G6

Btw, as there's not even a D in the 4th chord, I don't think we could call it a D chord, unless the bass or piano or something was stressing the D note. Hence why I notated it as a G chord.

So, your progression basically functions as:
I (tonic), II (supertonic), iii (mediant), V (dominant), V (dominant) with extended notes.

Note that the Dadd6/9 (which functions as our II [supertonic]) is a non-diatonic chord, as the diatonic supertonic chord would normally be ii.

now uhm...what the heck is G maj13(no 5th)?

Normally, all chords come with a 5th. The fifth (assuming there was one) would be D in any G chord. Musicians mostly play 5ths to round chords out a bit.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Oct 20, 2013,