#1
I got my taylor 214's action lowered from unplayable to playable, but now there is a fair amount of audible buzz, especially on the open wound strings and the first 3 frets of the wound strings. Especially when I'm playing any open chord progressions. It's very frustrating. I had this done at the shop that i bought my electric guitar from, and coincidentally, when they setup my action on the electric, it also resulted in buzz i'm still having issues with in the same areas. I know that setting up the two instruments is very different. So how do i amend this issue on my acoustic? The G, B and e strings are fine, open and anywhere on the neck. it's the other 3 that are an issue the E buzzes open and everywhere else. The A is not much better, but the buzzing stops higher than the 7th fret. same with the D.

Edit: just for clarification purposes: the setup was done about 3 weeks ago. i had hoped the new strings just needed to "settle." I believe they're martin light strings. I usually use medium. Perhaps that's the problem. This "setup" cost me $50.
Last edited by RyanMW2010 at Oct 19, 2013,
#2
Well Ryan, at least in part, this is your own damn fault. You took it to the wrong tech, and/ or you didn't take the time to learn how, and do the job yourself.

When someone sets action at home, they have the luxury of doing the job over a period of days, weeks, or even months. New guitars tend to settle in a bit when confronted with the stress of being tuned to concert pitch and left there. (They're usually shipped and warehoused maybe a whole tone down).

The second point is, if you're coming from an electric background, an acoustic will almost never be as easy to fret, and you need to build up hand strength to deal with it, which takes time as well.

Your strings are too low now, (and possibly too light as well), and that's why the guitar buzzes.

It's not a lost cause though. You can either make or purchase shims to go under the saddle, and raise the strings a little bit at a time, until the buzz goes away.

Another possibility is insufficient "relief" in the neck, which could require a VERY SLIGHT, (usually less than 1/2 turn), truss rod adjustment to correct.

Do yourself a favor, read, and make sure you understand, all 8 pages of this setup guide. No cheating, no skimming, there will be a test: http://thbecker.net/guitar_playing/guitars_and_setup/setup_page_01.html

You do have to consider the tech's predicament here. He, (or she), only has one shot, (a best guess really), to get the action right. The hope is the guitar owner will notice a huge improvement in fretting ease, and be happy about paying the bill.

So, once in a while, they go a bit to far. Another thing to consider is this, the tech could have a lighter touch than you, and the guitar may not have have buzzed when he was playing it.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Oct 19, 2013,
#5
Take it back and ask them to raise it a hair or two while you're there, hopefully for free? Or better yet if they can put back to specs and then just play it while it all stretches and settles in, like a couple months, depending on how much you play. Then start making minute adjustments and definately go to mediums! You're losing a lot of sound with lights
#6
I'd take it back and ask them to raise slightly. Sometimes it is a truss rod adjustment that causes it. Def read the setup guide. It's worth learning how to do it on your own, even if its small adjustments cause there's no need to pay someone when there's a slight buzz on one string that can easily be fixed. I also like the idea of tinkering with it over a few weeks. Strings should settle in fairly quick though if you play a decent about, maybe a week or so, theres almost always slight buzz with new strings (usually low e) and to me that means they will settle in perfect.
'I love her, but I love to fish...I'm gonna miss her"
#7
your 214 was unplayable new or used? taylor's playability right out of the box is legend.
if it was new and the action was too high that's probably just a case of fingerstrength or lack thereof. going to the shop that made your electric too low was kinda silly. unless your asking for it to be that low on both guitars. i would shim the bridge back up slowly as Cranky suggested.
need more gear and a lot more talent(courtesytuxs)
#8
I've been playing my 214 for around two years now I guess...I'm sure the action is almost identical on them.
It will never be the same as on an electric guitar so it takes some time getting used to and I think the action is pretty low for an acoustic guitar. So maybe you just screwed up your guitar. To be honest, I don't know how to lower the action on an acoustic guitar but I'm guessing it has something to do with the saddle. So maybe get that replaced or something. Of course at a better guitar shop.
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#9
Quote by stepchildusmc
your 214 was unplayable new or used? taylor's playability right out of the box is legend.
if it was new and the action was too high that's probably just a case of fingerstrength or lack thereof. going to the shop that made your electric too low was kinda silly. unless your asking for it to be that low on both guitars. i would shim the bridge back up slowly as Cranky suggested.


Well, new. But I suppose I exaggerated. I played beautifully for chordal and rhythm things. But bending strings more than 1/4 step was next to impossible. I've primarily been a rhythm player, so I was in love w/ the 214 when I got it. Btw, i got it like 4 years ago, lol. Lately, I've been trying to play more lead stuff, and I wanted the ability to bend a full step. i know it's different than electric guitar and requires more hand strength. If anything, I play harder and have stronger hands than the average player, imho. I've been playing primarily acoustic for a while, but I wanted to be able to play SRV on my acoustic so wanted the action lowered.
#10
Here'a a small excerpt for SRV @Wikipedia:

Vaughan was noted for playing extraordinarily thick strings, "as thick as barbed wire,"[2][15] He was not picky on string brand, but favored GHS Nickel Rockers of heavy gauge, partly for tone and partly because his fretting and strumming were so strong he often snapped strings while playing. He changed around gauges often, depending on the condition of his fingers, but always favored, from high to low, .013, .015, .019, .028, .038, .058. Sometimes he used a slightly lighter high E string (.012 or .011). He always tuned down one half step.


It does reinforce the argument that it's not the guitar, it's your hand strength.

Soooo....., time to bulk up......?
#11
Quote by Captaincranky
Here'a a small excerpt for SRV @Wikipedia:


It does reinforce the argument that it's not the guitar, it's your hand strength.

Soooo....., time to bulk up......?



haha that's electric, though. I'd bought an action measuring tool from stewmac and the action at the 12th fret on my 214 was about twice as high as recommended. the guitar is wonderful and i love it. but nobody's bending 2 steps on a G string with action that high.
#12
These thingamajigs are available at many auto parts stores:



They go up to a tenth inch on the fat side, and the body is about an eight inch. That should hook you up on both sides of the neck. Your center measurements are locked in by the curvature of the saddle.

Please read the guide I posted before you go flying back into this project.

SRV apparently tunes down 1/2 step, which does make a fair amount of difference in string tension. I tune 12 strings down a whole step, then capo up to play. That takes the string tension down, and the top nut string clearance out of the equation. (There no longer is any).

You'll notice that SRV's string set is actually custom, with the tops being fairly close together in size. But that is a thumping big E-6,which I'm pretty sure doesn't get bent all that much.

If your guitar WAS at 2X the recommended height, and now IS on spec, there is the chance it's a high fret or two, and possibly a relief adjustment away from playing like a dream.

And TBH, I can't bend an .012 a whole tone either, so I find songs I can play the rhythm and attempt to sing at the same time....peace

My paranoid delusions of guitar hero are decades behind me now.

One last thing, if the grooves in the top nut have been cut too deep, that can be, and usually is, a source of runaway, massive buzz.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Oct 19, 2013,