#1
I'm sorry if this is a stupid question!

But the title says it all really. Let's say a friend of mine is playing guitar, and I'd like to play bass over it. I've been playing guitar for a few years now, so I know the name of the chords. But I don't really know where to go from there?

I guess. If he plays a C chord, I can play a C on my bass? or?
#2
It depends on the music.

The most common note after the C
would be the G.

In other words, the I and V tones.

The most important thing is that the
bass is a rhythm machine. The bass
compliments the drums.

Bass usually has the I tone on the
number one beat and the V would
come in on the number three beat.

This is not always the case and
depends on the song.

You need to concentrate on your rest.
In other words, the places where you
don't make noise is important as the
notes you play.

This could go on for ever, but I don't
have that much time.

Hope that helped a little,

Tabdog
#3
As a bassist you need to learn how playing the root of the chord sounds like compared to playing the fifth or the third of the chord. Bass plays the lowest note of the chord so it matters pretty much. Playing the root of the chord sounds most stable. But sometimes you want to play the third for example to make the chord change sound smoother (for example Em-D/F#-G - and if you don't know what "slash chords" are, D/F# means that it's a D chord with F# in the bass). Sometimes you want to play the fifth. This is most commonly used before the dominant chord. For example if your progression ends with I-V - for example in D it would be D-A - you may want to play D/A-A to make it sound smoother.

Most of the time I play the root on the beat and between the chords play something else (sometimes chromatic line, sometimes chord tones, sometimes nothing depending on the song). Just listen to the groove of the song and play something to fit it. Bass is a lot about rhythm.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#5
Quote by Gingerlocks
So. If the guitarist is playing a C chord, I can play either C E or G?

And any other note. But most of the time C, E or G. It depends on the context. Learn the sounds of different notes over different chords. As I said, C will sound the most stable.

I usually play the root on the beat and then walk up/down to the next chord using chord tones or passing notes of course depending on the song.

Just listen to what other bassists do. Remember to think about the rhythm, not just the notes you are playing. I don't agree with people who say don't just play root notes. Root notes are the most stable notes and work well over any chord (and also some songs only need root notes - people that say don't do this and don't do that forget about the context - some songs need "boring" basslines to sound good). You could just play root notes and play interesting rhythms. Groove is very important and you want your bassline to fit the groove of the song. Play what the song needs you to play. It really depends on the song. Use your ears.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#6
Quote by MaggaraMarine
And any other note. But most of the time C, E or G. It depends on the context. Learn the sounds of different notes over different chords. As I said, C will sound the most stable.

I usually play the root on the beat and then walk up/down to the next chord using chord tones or passing notes of course depending on the song.

Just listen to what other bassists do. Remember to think about the rhythm, not just the notes you are playing. I don't agree with people who say don't just play root notes. Root notes are the most stable notes and work well over any chord (and also some songs only need root notes - people that say don't do this and don't do that forget about the context - some songs need "boring" basslines to sound good). You could just play root notes and play interesting rhythms. Groove is very important and you want your bassline to fit the groove of the song. Play what the song needs you to play. It really depends on the song. Use your ears.

What this man said. The song always let's you know if you have to stick with roots, or if you have some space to elaborate a more complex bassline. Generally, if the guitar(s) is playing on a chord with some distortion, taking most of the audible spectre, it tends to be better to go with root notes. When the guitar's sound is less full, there's the space for the bassline to come up front. At least this is my little advice coming from my short experience in a pop/rock band.
Quote by FatalGear41
When you break a bass string, that snapping sound is the sound of six dollars going down the crapper.



Sterling Ray 35
Hartke Ha3500 head - Gallien Krueger 212MBE cab
Tech 21 VT Bass
Zoom b2
Last edited by Sudaka at Oct 20, 2013,
#7
A lot of songs require that you hit the number I
note on every first beat of the measure and you
can do anything that sounds cool (improvise)
the rest of the time.

But you must hit the first beat with the Ist note
and it will probably have a rest. A rest is a quiet
space. In other words, it'll probably be a short
note.

Listen and try to play along with music you may
be into.

There is no substitute for practice,

Tabdog
#8
Let's take a G major chord, being played over and over again.

I'm taking the G chord because it sounds fairly deep, all notes that I'll mention are easy to get and stuff like that, just trust me.

The most simple thing you can do is play the G over and over in rhythm of the guitar, or straight 4/4.

Like dun dun dun dun dun dun dun dun dun dun dun.... ( like most pop punk songs)

A step higher, you can keep the same note and experiment with rhythm. You go like fourths and eights, dun dun dun dun dududun dun dun dun dun dun dududun dun. ( This is Ace of Spades except Lemmy plays fast ).


Or you go like the country triplets, listen to speed metal bands like Riot.

Dun dududun dududun dududun dududun dududn.


___

Let's get a step further from rhythm.

Play the octave.

So the G third fret on the E string and the G fifth fret on the D string. It sounds a bit funky. And you again start with the simple rhythm. Then it sounds like.

DunGI DunGI DunGI Dunnn DunGi DunGi DunGI Dunn... ( listen to High Voltage )

___

So you know chords right?

Well a G major has a G, an D and B if I am right. You play all of them in different octaves and make a line. Again 4/4.

G G D G G G B G G G D G G G B G.

If you play PICK or SLAP you need to use muted notes.


+ There is no substitute for practice.
Last edited by realsmoky at Oct 23, 2013,