#2
Hard to hear. Camera microphone not up to par.

Why do you link your band page and then have it restricted?
#4
^^^^ I'd actually say it's actually pretty good for a mic in the audience at a loud gig. You can hear all the instruments, and that's a rarity.

Firstly, I like the band and I like the song.

If you want me to get picky;

1. From a musical angle:

The band gets tighter as the song goes on. It's not like earlier there's anything glaringly out of time, though it sounds like there's some fumbles when the guitar solo/breakdown thing happens, specifically at 1:24 onwards the bass seems to drag a little behind the beat. Up to this point it's kinda "laggy" as well. It ends very well.

2. From a performance angle:

The bassist (I don't mean to pick on the bloke) either needs to change his stage position or move more. It's cool having a bassist just standing there doing his groove with the head bob, but that sort of bassist should be shifted further back to hang out with the drummer where they can gaze lovingly into eachother's eyes, not a silent presence at the front of the stage with a "I don't want to be here" face. It sticks out when the other guys are moving around.

Also the singer, as he's not connected to an instrument should get moving around more.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#5
Quote by AlanHB
^^^^ I'd actually say it's actually pretty good for a mic in the audience at a loud gig. You can hear all the instruments, and that's a rarity.

Firstly, I like the band and I like the song.

If you want me to get picky;

1. From a musical angle:

The band gets tighter as the song goes on. It's not like earlier there's anything glaringly out of time, though it sounds like there's some fumbles when the guitar solo/breakdown thing happens, specifically at 1:24 onwards the bass seems to drag a little behind the beat. Up to this point it's kinda "laggy" as well. It ends very well.

2. From a performance angle:

The bassist (I don't mean to pick on the bloke) either needs to change his stage position or move more. It's cool having a bassist just standing there doing his groove with the head bob, but that sort of bassist should be shifted further back to hang out with the drummer where they can gaze lovingly into eachother's eyes, not a silent presence at the front of the stage with a "I don't want to be here" face. It sticks out when the other guys are moving around.

Also the singer, as he's not connected to an instrument should get moving around more.


Thanks, Alan. Our bassist has pretty bad stage fright - we're working on it with him, but great idea on moving him a bit to the back till he gets over it.
#6
Quote by koslack
I don't normally do this, but what the hell. Always looking for feedback, so if any of you guys want to offer any criticism on our live show, would love to hear it.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cZym1OgYYDk

I think it sounds good. I don't think you need to force your bass player to move around or do anything visually that isn't comfortable or natural for him. He looks like a guy playing bass, and sounds good, that ain't a bad thing for "putting on a show".

When people TRY to put on a show it usually comes across as cheezy IMO. I'd say Just do what you do, and let it develop naturally.
#7
Quote by GuitarMunky
When people TRY to put on a show it usually comes across as cheezy IMO. I'd say Just do what you do, and let it develop naturally.


I think that you should put effort into what your band looks like from an audience perspective. The pro bands do it, why shouldn't you?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#8
Quote by AlanHB
I think that you should put effort into what your band looks like from an audience perspective. The pro bands do it, why shouldn't you?


There are alot of ways a band can look good to an audience. There is no need to emulate others when what you actually have to offer is just as good.

I mean Steve Vai puts on a good show, but it would be mistake IMO for someone like Eric Johnson to act like that when what he does naturally is perfectly enjoyable from an audience perspective.

To me that bass player looked fine. And personally I find it annoying and distracting when an entire band is trying to be the frontman. (and that's not a suggestion, just a personal opinion..... get a group of players that likes running all over the place, and do it well without sacrificing anything musically, and it could be cool)

My advice is to always work with what you have. Let it develop naturally, based on your own opinions, not on what you think your supposed to do.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Oct 23, 2013,
#9
^^^ Good point. I personally think that with high energy shows like this one however you should try to get
moving with the audience. As Koslack said the bass player is battling nerves and as he overcomes this maybe it will develop naturally over time.

I've personally noticed that the audience is more likely to enjoy the show if the band looks like they're enjoying it. For this reason sometimes it's good to force yourself to move, even if you don't feel like it. Interesting, sometimes we have gigs that we don't feel like playing because we're tired etc. However if you force yourself to move, you can end up enjoying playing and playing better than you would had you not moved.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#10
IMO the bassist not moving would have been fine if he hadn't stood next to the singer in front of the stage. It's all about his position on stage.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#11
Quote by AlanHB
As Koslack said the bass player is battling nerves and as he overcomes this maybe it will develop naturally over time.


Certainly possible

Quote by AlanHB

I've personally noticed that the audience is more likely to enjoy the show if the band looks like they're enjoying it. For this reason sometimes it's good to force yourself to move, even if you don't feel like it. Interesting, sometimes we have gigs that we don't feel like playing because we're tired etc. However if you force yourself to move, you can end up enjoying playing and playing better than you would had you not moved.


I guess I'd rather see a band actually enjoying themselves rather than fake it.

I know where you're coming from though. It's basically a business perspective.
#12
Quote by GuitarMunky
I guess I'd rather see a band actually enjoying themselves rather than fake it.

I know where you're coming from though. It's basically a business perspective.


Oh yes absolutely. I sometimes wonder about some of these massive tours that the big bands do. They have to get tired at some point, but put on a brave face and "perform". If you pay $100+ for a ticket, you're not going to excuse a half hearted performance just because the band was tired.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#13
Quote by AlanHB
Oh yes absolutely. I sometimes wonder about some of these massive tours that the big bands do. They have to get tired at some point, but put on a brave face and "perform". If you pay $100+ for a ticket, you're not going to excuse a half hearted performance just because the band was tired.



Well, I've seen some pretty lacklustre performances on big tours. One Incubus performance stands out in my mind.

At the same time, I've spoken to musicians who have done large tours, and they always say the same thing: "If there's a good amount of people, we play better. If we play better, the crowd gets more into it. If they get more into it, we play even better. Etc..."

So basically, if there's asses in the seats, most bands can play off that. No matter who you are, I don't imagine the adrenaline rush of playing in front of hundreds or thousands of people can wear off.