#1
Hi there,

I'm new here. After 6 years away from playing(I had a Strat Copy with HSS setup) I decided to pick up a guitar and made the purchase yesterday. I was considering a Squier Telecaster but after playing it and playing the Epiphone Special II that was at the store I enjoyed the sound just as much. It was a difficult decision because I enjoy music from the likes of Brad Paisley and other country tunes and will probably start with playing Country tunes on chords.

The real reason I stayed away from the Tele was the gentleman at the store. He said it sounded good but he showed me issues that would have to be dealt with from the get-go. The neck was dry and he told me I'd have to humidify it. He also showed me the frets that were sticking out because of the dry neck. He said humidifying it might take care of the issue or else they'd have to be filed. I really enjoyed the twangy sound however. Also noticed the pic board was scratched even after he played it for a few minutes after taking it out of the box(mind you, the special II doesn't have a protective piece).

Because of these issues I went with the Special II. Today I'm worried I'll regret it because it's a Tele and that's what I wanted. I could in the future buy a real Tele(in a few years) so that's Option A. I also have 30 days to decide.

As a beginner did I make the right decision to buy a guitar that sounds great(he said it came setup well from the manufacturer and that a gentleman was in the day before and he thought the guy was on a much higher end guitar till he looked over. He said it was more the player than the guitar but it still says a lot about the guitar.) Or should I have picked up the guitar I wanted just because of the name and the music I like? I feel like I made the right decision but I have this nagging feeling to go back and get what I wanted originally. However, I would probably get the feeling I shouldn't have gone back to get it if I do.(And no I can't buy both LOL)
#2
well, if you like it, then it wasnt the wrong decision
that said, not only would i say that the squier is better for country, but imo it is a better guitar objectively.
ymmv, though.
Quote by kangaxxter
Tone is in the fingers.

What you really need is a new amp.

(Anything I missed?)



Quote by Robbgnarly
I have been hearing about MG amps lately. I have heard good about them, but only a few times have they been talked about here.

#3
The decision is driving me crazy and it's all over a name, not the quality of the guitar because I couldn't tell the difference at my stage even if I wanted too. Can you make a Les Paul Copy like the Special II come close to the sound of a telecaster?
#4
Quote by drewhosick
The decision is driving me crazy and it's all over a name, not the quality of the guitar because I couldn't tell the difference at my stage even if I wanted too. Can you make a Les Paul Copy like the Special II come close to the sound of a telecaster?


Quote by randomguy2000
well, if you like it, then it wasnt the wrong decision
that said, not only would i say that the squier is better for country, but imo it is a better guitar objectively.
ymmv, though.



Les Pauls are incredibly, incredibly popular for country. Try to tell Toby Keith he needs to start playing Telecasters.


Country music's tone comes in a huge part from very heavy driven Fender style amps on the clean channel. It's slightly a myth that all that twang comes from a Telecaster. The biggest local country band guitarist around here uses an SG and gets amazing results from his Vintage Fender Bandmaster.

When I get off work, if I'm feeling froggy, I'll plug my SG into my Twin and show you guys that twang comes from hot tubes and a snappy reverb tank, not just a Telecaster.

If you want to learn how to do the country style really well, check out Greg Koch, study his play style, and you can make anything sound backcountry. Trying to copy Greg was the best thing I ever did for my Country/Blues leads. Check out his album "The Grip." Most of the songs on there are recorded with a Strat, Tele and LP.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
Last edited by JustRooster at Oct 23, 2013,
#5
Drewhosick, what part of the world are you in? I'm finding that it's difficult to give advice without that information, because some things are simply not available in some locations.

Those are two very different and two very beginner-level guitars. I've seen the Epi Special II's available for $89 at GC's here around Christmas time (and we're getting close). It's a very simple guitar -- a slab of wood with a neck bolted on and a couple of humbuckers. It's not really a Les Paul in any meaningful way other than that it has the name decaled on, and the only thing special about it is that it WILL be On Special over the holidays.

Toby Keith is NOT playing an Epi Special II, ever, anywhere.

Your "gentleman" at the store may have very skillfully slid you from a lower-margin guitar to a higher-margin one. If that particular Tele had issues, then maybe what you want to do is order one new, in a box.

That said, there's every chance that the Squiers will ALSO be on sale over the holidays. You can depend on walking into any Guitar Denter and finding an Epi, a Squier tele and a Squier strat at mark-down prices for the beginner and christmas gifting crowd. Great time to buy. But plan to have *any* of them set up (and the occasional stray fret hammered down) when you figure the actual cost.

Country Music has nothing to do with the guitars used these days. In the old days, teles were the Git-Tar of choice, but all that's changed, and even Brad Paisley's teles sound more like LPs and vice versa these days. Equal amounts of both, with LPs very very strong among the New Country (aka Old Classic Rock) folks. If you have four-wire humbucking pickups, you can set them up to coil tap, and then you'll have more single-coil sound than you can shake your stick at.
#6
Quote by dspellman

Toby Keith is NOT playing an Epi Special II, ever, anywhere.



Never said he did. Just making a point about telecasters and country tones. Calm down.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#7
Quote by JustRooster
Never said he did. Just making a point about telecasters and country tones. Calm down.


<*Assumes the lotus position, breathes deeply, closes his eyes, scratches his chakra*>

"Nammmmm Yooooo Hooooooo Rammmma Dammmma Dinnng Dooonggggg...."

And oh, by the way, we agree fully when it comes to telecasters and LPs and cah-huntry tones. I was just grinning, trying to imagine $150M net worth Toby Keith playing a Special II <G>.
#8
Maybe I just read into your post wrong. We coo', dawg.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#9
Quote by dspellman
Drewhosick, what part of the world are you in? I'm finding that it's difficult to give advice without that information, because some things are simply not available in some locations.

Those are two very different and two very beginner-level guitars. I've seen the Epi Special II's available for $89 at GC's here around Christmas time (and we're getting close). It's a very simple guitar -- a slab of wood with a neck bolted on and a couple of humbuckers. It's not really a Les Paul in any meaningful way other than that it has the name decaled on, and the only thing special about it is that it WILL be On Special over the holidays.

Toby Keith is NOT playing an Epi Special II, ever, anywhere.

Your "gentleman" at the store may have very skillfully slid you from a lower-margin guitar to a higher-margin one. If that particular Tele had issues, then maybe what you want to do is order one new, in a box.

That said, there's every chance that the Squiers will ALSO be on sale over the holidays. You can depend on walking into any Guitar Denter and finding an Epi, a Squier tele and a Squier strat at mark-down prices for the beginner and christmas gifting crowd. Great time to buy. But plan to have *any* of them set up (and the occasional stray fret hammered down) when you figure the actual cost.

Country Music has nothing to do with the guitars used these days. In the old days, teles were the Git-Tar of choice, but all that's changed, and even Brad Paisley's teles sound more like LPs and vice versa these days. Equal amounts of both, with LPs very very strong among the New Country (aka Old Classic Rock) folks. If you have four-wire humbucking pickups, you can set them up to coil tap, and then you'll have more single-coil sound than you can shake your stick at.


I'm in Ontario, Canada. Looks like a pretty good price at 170 compared to similar products. I really do like the guitar. I'm probably just overreacting. The Tele came straight out of the box but he did show me the fret problem and told me the difference between the two was that it would need some TLC before use whereas the Special II seemed ready to play. He didn't deny they were both starters and he didn't push me towards one or the other. I just came to the conclusion talking it out that if the guitar was ready to go versus the tele then it would be a smarter move on my part because as a beginner I didn't have to deal with any "issues" from the getgo.

I've been playing around with it this evening and I think I'm going to stick with it. I can always look at a tele down the road I guess. I probably shouldn't have bought the modelling amp I did :-(. I do like it as well but maybe i should have gone with a simple amp. I got the Vypyr 15 which seems really good for the price.

One question I do have. When playing seated, if I have a Les Paul style body, where should the guitar rest? The part that goes in between the rounded back and the front end on my right knee? Cause that feels like it's too far to the right for me. When I put the rounded end(around the back part where the strings attach) it feels better to me but it's too high and it wants to slide off.