#1
G'Day all,

Just wondering if somebody here can help me out with the following predicament? I've been absolutely obsessed with Jazz recently and am itching to transcribe some solos. I started transcribing "Sookie Sookie" by Grant Green, but some of the lines (namely the very first blues-scale run he does) are just too technical for me. I can play them and transcribing them is certainly no problem, but I'd love to jam along with a record (hopefully in perfect time) and really soak up the groove. The speed of some of the Jazz licks has been a huge source of frustration.

At this current moment, I'm interested in developing my ear and soaking up the groove, swing etc. and speed isn't (currently) at the top of my "to-do" list. I know I CAN work on the technique and work my speed up, but it'll take months.

So...can anybody here recommend me some (slow to mid-speed) Jazz solos? I've trawled a bunch of forums seeking some guidance, but most Jazz musos' definition of simple seem to be based around the complexity of the scales/modes/arpeggios used, rather than the technical aspects. It seems almost as if super-speed licks are an inherent ability of every guitarist, as long as they can wrap their head around the sound. Me? I'm the direct opposite. Transcribing is a piece of cake, I can nail all the notes from some complex solos...but playing along with the recording in time? Not a chance, my technique doesn't allow it.

Any suggestions/recommendations would be greatly appreciated!

The solos do not necessarily have to be guitar solos BTW. In fact, if any reasonable-speed Sax solos exist out there, I'd be stoked about the opportunity to rip them off. :P
Last edited by Soren Arkwright at Oct 23, 2013,
#2
Welcome to the world of jazz!

There is a few musicians i'd recommend you to check out. They are in different types of jazz, so i hope that is not a problem.

Firstly i would recommend a great jazz guitarist called Russell Malone. The majority of the tunes he plays are in a lower tempo, and the lines are not that technical.

Another great guitar player called Wes Montgomery. He does have both less and more challenging tunes, so explore much of him and see which of his songs you can learn.

Saxophone player called Joe Henderson. Same as Wes here, both technical songs and more simple songs.

Trumpet player Miles Davis is a master of playing great jazz solos without using too technical stuff.

Moving into more of what people would call "elevator jazz" or "smooth jazz". Check out stuff by Andy Snitzer and Michael Lington. Snitzer have a few songs that are really jazzy, and a lot that are more of an R'n'B sound. Recommended listen is the "Alfie´s Theme" record.

If you are interested in more Jazz musicians of various levels and instruments, feel free to send me a PM. I listen to and transcribe a lot of jazz as well, and also jazz-fusion if that would interest you.

Cheers!
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
Last edited by Sickz at Oct 23, 2013,
#4
i love to transcribe, i try to do it daily
if the solo is too fast/challenging to transcribe i use this program to slow the recording down without affecting the pitch http://www.seventhstring.com/
when i practice it, if its a hard solo i just use the same program to play it slow, lets say at 50% or 65% and i gradually increase the speed

some suggestions, try transcribing some dexter gordon and gene ammons solos
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IVu_g_9oFwU
Last edited by SuperKid at Oct 23, 2013,
#5
I second what Superkid said also. There is nothing wrong with working on stuff that is faster then you can handle at the moment, just slow it down and work on it.

Check out software like anytune, amazing slow downer, transcribe etc.

There are tons of musicians to learn from, and you shouldn't have to neglect great ideas you might enjoy cause they are a little too fast for you. Slow them down until you can play them and study them, i do this all the time with Charlie Parker, Allan Holdsworth and Andreas Öberg lines.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#7
Quote by Sickz
Welcome to the world of jazz!

There is a few musicians i'd recommend you to check out. They are in different types of jazz, so i hope that is not a problem.

Firstly i would recommend a great jazz guitarist called Russell Malone. The majority of the tunes he plays are in a lower tempo, and the lines are not that technical.

Another great guitar player called Wes Montgomery. He does have both less and more challenging tunes, so explore much of him and see which of his songs you can learn.

Saxophone player called Joe Henderson. Same as Wes here, both technical songs and more simple songs.

Trumpet player Miles Davis is a master of playing great jazz solos without using too technical stuff.

Moving into more of what people would call "elevator jazz" or "smooth jazz". Check out stuff by Andy Snitzer and Michael Lington. Snitzer have a few songs that are really jazzy, and a lot that are more of an R'n'B sound. Recommended listen is the "Alfie´s Theme" record.

If you are interested in more Jazz musicians of various levels and instruments, feel free to send me a PM. I listen to and transcribe a lot of jazz as well, and also jazz-fusion if that would interest you.

Cheers!

Man, cannot thank you enough for Russell Malone suggestion! I checked out some of his work...sometimes he plays slow, occasionally the dude just SHREDS! I stumbled upon this track (blown away by it), so I'm transcribing it as we speak. Not quite a solo, but the perfect thing to "open up" my (to be) Jazz-ears.

Russell Malone - Swing Low, Sweet Chariot
#8
Quote by GameSkate

This is perfect too. Will make it my next transcription, once I'm through with the Russell Malone song. Cheers!

Superkid/Sikz: Good thoughts on the slow down software, actually. My ego was too huge to use it, but I guess in terms of the Grant Green track I was working on before probably slowing it down to 75% is a much more fun way to work up my speed rather than practicing scales.
Last edited by Soren Arkwright at Oct 24, 2013,
#9
Quote by Soren Arkwright


Superkid/Sikz: Good thoughts on the slow down software, actually. My ego was too huge to use it, but I guess in terms of the Grant Green track I was working on before probably slowing it down to 75% is a much more fun way to work up my speed rather than practicing scales.


Yeah exactly, the best way to improve at something is practicing what you want to improve. So i believe slowing down the fast lines and practicing them is more benefitial for you than practicing scales. Cause then you learn jazz language, your ear and your technique at the same time.

As said, if you want more people to study i know tons of great jazz and jazz-fusion musicians you can study, if you just slow them down.

Cheers.
Sickz
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#12
Necrobump
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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Yamaha P115
#14
Closed.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp