#1
Hi

I'm a senior this year and invloved in A LOT of music programs at school. I'm in Marching band, Symphonic band, Choir, and Orchestra and i'm very proud to have been apart of my counties honor choir recently.

Being in all these aspects of studies, i'm really nervous my guitar playing wont be where I want it to be by the near future. (when college begins or all the way through it). I can't alternate pick past 82bpm (16th note triplets) and can't do really anything else fancy. I want this to be my main instrument of study when I go to college to study music, but I don't want to give up singing and my Bass Clarinet as well.

Do you think that with all the time devoted to these activities I can still become the guitarist I want to be? I practice about 2-4 hours tops on school days and 4-6 hours on weekends. Willing to give more.

And I also need time with friends as well. I don't know, i'm i'm over thinking this. But I just don't ever want to NOT be what I want to be as a guitar player.
#2
dude relax lol, in your situation the one thing that could stop you is yourself. 2-4 hours a day is plenty. Idk what music youre making, but the guitar is just a tool, with all the singing and bass clarinet playing and the right enthusiasm your musicality is gonna evolve to be grande.
#3
Why, out of all the aspects of guitar playing, have you felt the need to fixate on the bpm at which you can alternate pick at - and I'm assuming that's a single exercise that you play regularly and keep chasing the metronome with.

That number is utterly meaningless when it comes to quantifying how "good" you are - guitar isn't a sport, you can't chart your progress with statistics.

Can you play any songs?
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#5
Rofl, you can play very good without playing 64th note triplets pentatonic scale runs at 666bpm speed.
#6
have S.M.A.R.T. Goals
Practice smarter not harder. Better 30 mins of great practice than 4 hours of alternate picking in front of the TV.
Enjoy playing.
Also, sometimes you might come to a place where you need to make sacrifices, it doesn't sound like you have to give up clarinet but maybe one day you will... just be realistic when that comes, better to fulfil one commitment than fail at two.
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#7
Ever think you maybe playing too much music? You're brain does need a break!
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#8
Time spent on different musical instruments will help your guitar skills, because it's making you a better musician. I took a few years off from playing guitar and practiced drumming instead. Not just bashing away, but proper diligent practice. Now that I've picked up guitar again I find that my rhythm is so much better, my timing is much tighter, and I feel comfortable working with riffs and djent style syncopation cos I'm using a whole bunch of mental tools that I did not have before.
So don't sweat it. Enjoy MUSIC. Remember that your instrument is just a way to make MUSIC. Learn about the goal, don't get stuck on the way to get there.
#9
Playing fast won't matter at all if you're looking to audition for a college music program. Mostly they're going to look at competency with a memorized piece, reading ability, and your overall level of interest and potential.

Sextuplets at 82bpm is a fine speed if you're playing anything that's not fast rock music. I've played for 17 years and don't practice scales faster than sextuplets at 80.

The key to improvement is having goals and practice regimen to achieve them. Pick some songs you really want to learn, or some audition pieces, and spend some time on them at least 5 days a week.
Last edited by cdgraves at Oct 25, 2013,