#1
Hey

I am looking to improve my speed so im going to 10 hour workouts with the metronome and put every thing else on the back burner for a while.

But as you can imagine 10 hours is going to get boring... does any one have any fun and varied exercises to practice with the metronome.

I need to keep the variety up, also any recommended DVDs that teach guitar speed well as i have some money to spend and this is deffinately my weak point when it comes to playing guitar.
#2
My advice is not to day 10 hours a day because that's monumental overkill. 2 - 3 hours is probably the most amount of effective practice you're going to get in. Anything on top of that is just contributing to an RSI filled future.
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#3
Well im already doing 10 hour playing but its a mix of different stuff. I want to some what reach muscle fatigue on alternate picking so the muscles get stronger, similiar to the principles used in weight lifting, or at least get to 90% of failure.
#4
Just take it easy. I don't get all this 10 hours of practicing. You just can't focus 100% on one thing (playing the guitar) for 10 hours - yes, you can play the guitar for 10 hours a day but practicing effectively and playing the guitar are two different things. There's no need to hurry. Speed comes over time. And playing the guitar isn't all about speed and technique.

Actually your practicing is a lot more effective if you practiced less hours a day but every day in a week. Because you learn when you sleep. And if you learn too much in one day, I'm not sure if you will remember it all tomorrow.

I don't get all this need to hurry in things like speed and technique. It will come over time. You don't need to play at 300 bpm after a year of playing the guitar. Also, you could use those ten hours on a lot more important things like writing songs or playing in a band - something where you can really apply your skills - or maybe just hang out with your friends. If you can't write good songs or at least play musically, your technique doesn't matter, no matter how good you are at sweep or tremolo picking at 300 bpm.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Oct 24, 2013,
#5
Well I've been playing for about 7 years and i struggle to fast licks at tempos at around 126 BPM. I spent a long time learning other things, when it came to shredding and stuff i only recently got into it.

So far it all feels very much like endurance being my main obstable, given my arm feels like its going to fall off all the time when playing some of these songs im trying to learn.
#6
If your arm feels like it's gonna fall off you're probably tensing up too much. Slow it down till you can play totally relaxed and build from there. Fatigue happens much quicker when tensed up
#7
there's more than one path to getting really fast on guitar.. IMO the practicing 10 hours of exercises every day thing isn't really the best one..

I think dude it's probably far more important to spend like.. 20 minutes a day doing exercises.. and if you must practice for 10 hours, use the rest of the time to study scales and arpeggios and musical sounding things. sure practice them with a metronome.. you'll be a far better guitar player in the long run. if you really want to be a virtuoso its more important to think about 'what can i practice today to make my phrasing and musicality more and more unique'
#8
goddamn 10 hours a day?! your a maniac! but hey i like the commitment.
Ultimately, it's all an Illusion for your confusion.

#9
Quote by MaggaraMarine

Actually your practicing is a lot more effective if you practiced less hours a day but every day in a week. Because you learn when you sleep. And if you learn too much in one day, I'm not sure if you will remember it all tomorrow.


+1

if i'm struggling with something i put it away for the day and come back to it the next day. more often than not i'm better at it the next day.

and practising when you're tired can arguably do more harm than good.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#10
You're overkilling yourself. But I got really fast by doing scales as fast I can as clean as I can without a metronome. Then I would combine that by playing songs that required fast chord changes ex Rage, Metallica or just take simple songs by like Nirvana and speed it up. Playing fast paced punk songs is what got my picking hand in great shape. The adrenaline rush you get will help to get faster over time without the added tension a metronome creates.

At the height of my practice I would do 8 - 12hr days for weeks, but that was after I already built a proper foundation. I would just have my guitar in hand and play while I was watching tv or a movie or listening to music. I would just always have it in my hand unplugged doing the same scales over and over again. Sometimes it would be part of a solo I'm stuck on or a chord movement. But I've never actually sat down and said I'm going to practice for 8 hrs today

IDK I kind of just programmed myself into believing that it was an extension of my everyday life. So say you're playing video games and need a little break pick up your guitar do some scales real quick with a slow build starting off with a slow tempo to warm up your hands and slowing build to full speed then push yourself to a madman pace, slow back down a bit, then get back to gaming. Before you know it not only will you be a lot faster but it should also improve your improvisation, well that's what did it for me. Then you mix in your favorite solos and before you know it, you can not only improvise your fav solo but also move it up and down the fretboard without having to even think about it

You'll also naturally build up to playing 10 hrs.
Last edited by renk at Oct 24, 2013,
#11
What about any DVD's that teach speed techniques? I'm told Paul Gilbert and Petrruci have DVDs on it but are they recommended?
#12
Quote by thefollower
Hey

I am looking to improve my speed so im going to 10 hour workouts with the metronome and put every thing else on the back burner for a while.

Whoa, whoa, whoa...10 hours? What exactly are you possibly going to do in 10 hours, that you couldn't accomplish (in a more productive manner, most likely) in 2-3 hours?
#13
^ a serious injury
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#15
Quote by thefollower
What about any DVD's that teach speed techniques? I'm told Paul Gilbert and Petrruci have DVDs on it but are they recommended?


It depends on who you ask.

Some players like DVD's to learn technique. Other players (like me) work on our technique by just learning tunes and recording ourselves on video on a regular basis and listen/watch back on our playing and evaluate what can be fixed, if we can't see it when we play of course. For example i know for a fact that it's very easy for me to get sloppy with my picking, so i often make sure that i accent everything and such, and i will see in my recordings that i have improved.

I do however own the John Petrucci Rock Discipline DVD. I would say if you are not a guy that treats technique the way i do (by tunes) and want a more strict exercise based session, then maybe it's good for you. The whole thing can surely be found on youtube, so i would suggest you look it up there.

Cheers
Sickz
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

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#16
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
Which wouldn't be very productive!


yeah
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#17
Rock Disciple has always been highly regarded but in my experience it got boring and tedious quick. It's great as far as structuring and focusing your practice, I can't remember what techniques he teaches but again it's highly regarded and has been sort of one of those staples, meat and potatoes kind of thing.

I just looked up the exercises, the arpeggios, left hand - right hand exercises and I believe there were also string skipping exercises .. Those were a staple of my practice routine for a long time..

here are two articles on practicing by Petrucci
http://www.guitarworld.com/john-petrucci-practice-tips-part-1
http://www.guitarworld.com/john-petrucci-practice-tips-part-2