#1
Hello.

I usually play a fender strat with normal action and 10's

Would it be benificial for me to buy a cheap acoustic, with high action and thickker strings solely for practise? or wouldn't it make a difference just practising on with my strat?

Looking for people who have practised like this and their experience.

Thank you
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#2
practise is all about being comfortable and having a good time. Why would you want to make things more difficult for yourself? It will only probably hinder your progress in the long wrong playing badly set up guitars can have shitty side effects like RSI or carpel tunnel which you don't want to have if you plan to earn a living from this.
#3
You play electric so you should be practising on an electric, unless you now want to play acoustic.
#5
In the past I used to learn things and songs on my low-class acoustic guitar with high action and thick strings. When I thought I had mastered the particular thing, then I played it on the electric guitar. Then it was absolutely easy to play it on electric when I learned it the hard way.
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#6
That's not the way to practice. You should learn it on the instrument that you want to play, otherwise you're spending time adjusting to the nuances of the other instrument and then having to come back again. Plus they require completely different skill sets.

The best and right way to practice is slowly, with a metronome so that you can play it in time, without mistakes. Any other way promotes mistakes.
#7
Get the acoustic set up so your action isn't too high. The acoustic will help strengthen your fretting hand and sometimes its just nice to sit on the back porch strumming away on an acoustic. Never hurts to learn a new instrument and most of the techniques will carry over.
#8
Yea I agree that playing the acoustic is great, but not to use as a learning tool for the electric, you should be using the electric for that.
#9
Quote by WantToLearn
Hello.

I usually play a fender strat with normal action and 10's

Would it be benificial for me to buy a cheap acoustic, with high action and thickker strings solely for practise? or wouldn't it make a difference just practising on with my strat?


Actually, practicing on an acoustic can screw up your electric playing to an extent. You'll be working with higher action, less bendability, larger strings and the requirement to lift your fingers higher and push down harder. That may strengthen your fingers a bit, but your technique on the electric will suffer.

Practice more on the Strat.
#11
Why is your Strat set up well? You could just raise your action and buy ridiculously heavy strings and only play on clean sound and all that (or just instead of having bought a good Fender Strat, you could have just bought the cheapest and worst feeling guitar). But why make things more difficult? You want your guitar to feel good in your hands, don't you?

I think you want a guitar that feels good in your hands. I don't see a point in making things more difficult. Yes, playing on a crappy guitar makes it feel easier to play on a good guitar because you notice the huge difference between them. But playing on a crappy guitar makes your progress slower. You'll also enjoy practicing more on a good feeling guitar so you'll practice more.

If you want to improve your finger strength or something, start playing the bass. It's also a cool instrument and worth learning. And it's a lot more fun to play than a crappy feeling guitar.
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