#1
Hi. I'm currently copper shielding the cavities in my guitar, and while deciding how to ground the copper I am a bit confused as to whether my guitar is grounded properly.

See attached images, when I try to embed pics with a photobucket url it says "forbidden link" for some reason, grrr.

I have noticed there is only 1 wire going to the output jack from the tone pot, it is attached to the inside pin, with a wire bridging that with the outside pin. (DSC_0816.jpg). From what I understand, the grounding path from a guitar is through the output jack and the outside pin is the ground. So I'm worried that any grounded current is going through the main signal output wire, which must be bad right?
All ground wires, as well as the blue wires from the pickups are soldered to the back of the volume pot, including a ground attached to the bridge spring assembly (DSC_0818.jpg). Could it be that the spring assembly is being used as the main ground point instead of the output jack?

I have screwed down a new wire to the copper shielding (DSC_0820.jpg) and was going to solder that to the volume pot with all the other grounds.

Also, should I bother shielding the bridge pickup cavity as the pickguard doesn't cover it? If I did, it would be connected to the pickguard copper along the top edge.
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#2
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Quote by Egg90
Hi. I'm currently copper shielding the cavities in my guitar, and while deciding how to ground the copper I am a bit confused as to whether my guitar is grounded properly.

I have noticed there is only 1 wire going to the output jack from the tone pot, it is attached to the inside pin

Yep. That connects to the tip of your plug. Also called the 'hot'

with a wire bridging that with the outside pin. (DSC_0816.jpg).

Yep that's called the ring of the plug, which is ground

From what I understand, the grounding path from a guitar is through the output jack and the outside pin is the ground. So I'm worried that any grounded current is going through the main signal output wire, which must be bad right?

Why are you worried? That's how most guitars are wired. The grounding path isn't through the main signal wire (the hot) its through its own ground wire

All ground wires, as well as the blue wires from the pickups are soldered to the back of the volume pot, including a ground attached to the bridge spring assembly (DSC_0818.jpg). Could it be that the spring assembly is being used as the main ground point instead of the output jack?

I have screwed down a new wire to the copper shielding (DSC_0820.jpg) and was going to solder that to the volume pot with all the other grounds.

Yes. Thats a better way instead of soldering all the grounds to the back of a pot. Its pretty hard on the pot soldering all those cables to the back of it. Gets very hot.

Also, should I bother shielding the bridge pickup cavity as the pickguard doesn't cover it? If I did, it would be connected to the pickguard copper along the top edge.

Yes you should, else you've only done half the job. Like you said the connection will be completed through the pickguard copper

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Last edited by Phoenix V at Oct 27, 2013,
#3
Thanks for the reply. I looked a bit closer at the output jack connections.
Before I thought there was only the hot (blue) wire coming out of the guitar to it, with the very short (white) wire connecting that to the ring also. However now I see that the white wire actually runs inside the blue one so the hot & ground are encased in one wire.
Where the white wire splits off to the ring however the plastic is a little mashed up, exposing the wire, which is why I thought there was only 1 wire & not 2 running into the guitar.
Looks like I need to cut back & re-solder the connections to the jack.
Thanks for your help.
#4
Actually the pot casing is elevated well above the guts and as long as the pot isn't at max or min rotation (where a plastic stop engages a metal tab on the inside of the casing) it's pretty hard to damage it just by soldering to the back of the case.