#1
Hi all!

I'd like to ask for some advice on how to achieve a good sound in Guitar Rig. The thing is that I don't know anything about amps and effects so I don't even know where to start. Do you know either a guide to Guitar rig or some other "Amps and effects for dummies" kind of thing out there? All I really need is just a basic understanding.

I have experimented with presets, originals that come with the program and also downloaded ones, but they all sound like sh*t. Probably because my setup is a lot weaker than the ones they were made on. So I have to customize everything, but I don't have a clue where to start.

Stuff that I usually have problem with: background noise, not enough crunch (crank, power, juice whatever you want to call it), delay, no sustain at all.

Cheers!

Edit: I have a simple M-audio USB interface if that matters.
Last edited by MetalMullet at Oct 27, 2013,
#2
Quote by MetalMullet
Stuff that I usually have problem with: background noise, not enough crunch (crank, power, juice whatever you want to call it), delay, no sustain at all.


a better interface wouldn't hurt, but you should be able to work around that for simple applications.

try a tubescreamer effect going into a marshall/british type amp for crunch. add a little delay for solos if you want some sustain. turn on a noise suppressor/noise gate and that should take care of much of the background noise.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

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#3
Okey, I tweaked around a little bit and I must say I'm pretty satisfied with the results. It sounds good. One issue still remains though: the sustain is still bad. And the higher frets I play, the worse the sustain gets.

So I was wondering if it could have something to do with that I've recently lowered my strings significantly. I read somewhere that you can't have your pick ups too high either. For me it sounds strange, I thought the closer to the strings the better. So what do you say, should I have a go messing with the pick ups?

Thanks again!
#4
Have you got the noise gate enabled in GR5? If so it might be hurting your sustain. Also, often you can crank up your input sensitivity to get better sustain.

One of the most common mistakes in GR for people new to it is they think that because they CAN have everything, they SHOULD have everything. Just add items to the signal chain as necessary and use the most minimal rig you can to get the sound you want.

As for pickups, passives rely on relatively strong magnets and if you get them too close to the strings you get magnetic dampening, which kills sustain. You have to find the balance between signal strength and magnetic problems. Of course this doesn't apply with active pickups, as they use much weaker magnets coupled to a preamp.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
Last edited by Arby911 at Oct 28, 2013,
#5
Thanks! And yes, I have passives. So if I lower the noise gate and the sustain gets better, would that eliminate the possibility of too high pick ups? And if the contrary, is there anything I could try before tweaking the pickups?

And since you're totally right in your assumption about me being a newbie, I have tried the most minimalistic settings in Guitar Rig, but the sustain was the same.
#6
Quote by MetalMullet
Thanks! And yes, I have passives. So if I lower the noise gate and the sustain gets better, would that eliminate the possibility of too high pick ups? And if the contrary, is there anything I could try before tweaking the pickups?


I would turn the noise gate down (or off, I don't use it for most setups) and turn your input sensitivity up to try to find the sweet spot before I'd mess with the pickups at all.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#7
i've never used that software, but you could try a compressor in your chain before the gate on your lead tones. that could help you squeeze extra sustain before the signal gets gated.
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#8
Okey, so I played around with the noise gate and yes, I get a little better sustain, still not perfect though. And it gets too noisy as well. It just seems impossible, too many different combinations to try.

Anywhere I could read about these kind of stuff? Because I have no idea what affects what or where I should start. Now I remember why I put my electric down a couple of years ago and started on acoustic. I really feel for some thrashing now though, but after a couple of days of hopeless trying I'm ready to throw all this shit out of the window.

I will have a go at Amlitube as well, but I doubt it'll be any simpler than GuitarRig.
Last edited by MetalMullet at Oct 31, 2013,
#9
Amplitube is much more user-friendly in my opinion, but for everything that's not metal or Custom Shop (yes, Amplitube has a CS), GR5 simply sounds better in my opinion. I'd replace the cab models in both softwares with external cab impulses anyway, though, but seeing you're not very familiar with the entire concept of the softwares, you might want to leave that for later.

What kind of tones are you trying to achieve and what guitar are you using? Also, what are you using to monitor your sound?
#10
Quote by I K0nijn I
Amplitube is much more user-friendly in my opinion, but for everything that's not metal or Custom Shop (yes, Amplitube has a CS), GR5 simply sounds better in my opinion. I'd replace the cab models in both softwares with external cab impulses anyway, though, but seeing you're not very familiar with the entire concept of the softwares, you might want to leave that for later.

What kind of tones are you trying to achieve and what guitar are you using? Also, what are you using to monitor your sound?


I think you're right, I want to keep it as simple as possible.

Well, since I mostly play acoustic I'd like to have a raw metal tone on my electric so I can release some tension when I play. I used to play a lot of Metallica songs since they are fairly simple and that's what I probably going to pick up again. The tone doesn't really have to be exact, but something that fits for that kind of style.

Yesterday I made some progress when I realized that I have to keep the input level fairly low. The guitar I'm using is the cheapest Epiphone you can find out there with stock pick-ups (passives). I have a USB interface with a couple of M-Audio monitors, BX5 D2 they are called. But usually I play with headphones.

I also noticed that you can plug the different components in different orders that significantly changes your sound. Any suggestions on a regular order to achieve good results? What should I start with? I got a better sound when I started out with the distortion effects then I plug in some amp cabinets, but it sounds strange to me. My logic says that distortion should be last.

And a last question: when I finally put together a decent tone I noticed that the higher notes are kind of vibrating. It's not a nice clean sound, but rather an ecoing type of vibrating sound. It makes the solos sound shit. If that makes sense, what could it be?

Thanks!
Last edited by MetalMullet at Nov 1, 2013,
#11
The order of your chain goes from top to bottom in Guitar Rig. Something in front of the amp model goes above the amp model. Something in the loop goes in between the amp model and the cab modeling. Something post-processing you'd like goes on the bottom.

In Guitar Rig, there's the Gratifier model, which is supposed to be a Mesa Rectifier. I'd start out with that. Just use the matched cab (you can scroll through some cabs here if you like to) for now. There's a Tubescreamer model (don't know what it's called, but it's green and has 3 knobs) in the distortion section. You'll want to put that on top in the Guitar Rig interface. Volume all the way up, Gain/drive/distortion/whatever at 0 and maybe leave tone in the middle.

Then I can't really help more to get to a tone other than to say you'll be best off keeping the gain not too high on the Gratifier model and then just adjust the EQ to taste.

If you've not used Amplitube, try it. It has a 5150-model that, although not sounding like a 5150 that much imo, outdoes GR5 for metal completely, in my opinion.

The vibrating kind of sound will either be your guitar or your interface, I think; I've never had that problem, really.