#1
I was just jamming with my band and I suddenly realized that my solos were not same with the chords played by our synthesizer player.So,I started to know and practice pentatonic scale.Now,I realised that,there's a lot of patterns of a single scale,and time by time,it is getting more confusing.Can anyone make it simple for me so that I could be able to create solos according to the chords.Thank you!!
#2
I got two answers here, if you wanna skip all the work or ure just not interested in this at the moment, scroll down to my last paragraph.

Well, Its as simple as this(which isnt simple):
You have 12 notes, and you have so and so many chords in your song. At any given moment it depends on the chords and on the context of the chords which notes will be in and out sounding, which ones you choose/want is depended on you and your ears.

Enough with that,
I advise you to get familiar with the sound of the Major Scale and how its laid out on your fretboard, this also means, getting familiar with it's harmony/chords. It's the foundation of Western music, there are so many sounds hidden in the major scale, including Minor and other tonalities. After that, slowly add the other 5 tones into your music, see where and when they appear in chords and when they can be used according to your own taste.
To get help and inspiration, listen to your favorite Players and find out how they are doing it.


OR

Learn the Major and Minor scale Shapes and combine them with pentatonix.
Then find out what key you are in and just start Playing.
Last edited by Ignore at Oct 28, 2013,
#3
Did you mean to play the same notes as the synthesiser?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#4
Learn about consonance and dissonance. Some notes (chord tones) sound consonant over a chord and the others (non-chord tones) sound dissonant. This doesn't mean you should only play consonant notes because dissonant notes can also sound good if used right. They also make your melodies sound more interesting. Some notes sound more dissonant than others but all non-chord tones are dissonances.

You need to use your ears and not just play random notes. Actually your ears are pretty good at telling if the note you are playing sounds dissonant or not. Try to think in sound (it is hard at first but gets easier over time).
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#5
Just grab any pattern you like, choose a backing track from youtube and play along.

Example...if you're playing A minor pentatonic in the pattern that is

e 5----8
B 5---8
G 5---7
D 5--7
A 5---7
E 5---8

Choose a "A minor backing track" from youtube.

With this you can start to learn how to use the pentatonic with songs and other chords.

This is the easy way, the guys from the top told you the hard way but the one that it'll be more useful.
Last edited by SrThompson at Oct 28, 2013,
#6
^ There's nothing wrong with that but many times people just start noodling around with the scale and just playing random notes without paying attention to how it sounds like. Consonance and dissonance is a really simple concept as I explained. You just need to know the chord tones. Everything else is dissonant. You'll learn about consonance and dissonance even if you don't know what that means. I mean, when you just play by ear, you know which notes will sound good. You'll naturally find the consonant notes.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#9
I don't recommend to my students that they learn scale shapes. Instead, I tell them, learn the ****ing fretboard... all the notes in every viable tuning. After that, they are so familiar with the fretboard that they can create any scale they want all by themselves. After that I tell them to pick up piano to learn some hardcore theory =)
#10
Quote by Erc
I don't recommend to my students that they learn scale shapes. Instead, I tell them, learn the ****ing fretboard... all the notes in every viable tuning. After that, they are so familiar with the fretboard that they can create any scale they want all by themselves. After that I tell them to pick up piano to learn some hardcore theory =)


I'll go offtopic with this answer but f*** it.

I don't agree (I'm not saying that you're wrong), but I think that you need to learn the shape and the notes of the scale, then if you do all the shapes of the scale trying to find the root note and make the chord in that form (here you'll also learn the CAGED system) in different cycles (cycle of 5th, 4th, 3rd....) along all the fretboard you'll learn all the notes.

I'm doing it this way and I'm doing quite well (I'm still learning)
#11
lol =). It actually is a lot of work. CAGED system is still pretty good method though. The few students that I do have (most bail after I give them that assignment.) achieve a lot of success after that.

It is kind of like Freidrich Neuhaus's method of teaching bach. He says, learn all of the bach preludes and fugues transcribed into every key. I've actually heard that that was his only lesson. His students (Stainslav, Richter and Giles) all achieved massive levels of success though. So anyways, choose your poison =)
#12
Quote by Erc
I don't recommend to my students that they learn scale shapes. Instead, I tell them, learn the ****ing fretboard... all the notes in every viable tuning. After that, they are so familiar with the fretboard that they can create any scale they want all by themselves. After that I tell them to pick up piano to learn some hardcore theory =)


I recommend to my students to learn all relevant information at an appropriate time.

To suggest that knowing the notes on the fretboard in every tuning on its own will enable a person to create any scale they want is a bit disingenuous. More information is necessary, much of which can be illustrated as shapes or patterns on the fretboard.

Of-course learning the shapes alone would be insufficient as well, which is why it's important to never overstate the value of one piece of information, or angle. In reality you need much more to get a thorough and more importantly, useful understanding.

to the TS...

If you want to learn to improvise solos, spend some time learning to play solos (and the full songs they come from). Memorize them, play the shit out of them, absorb them.

Understanding theory will be helpful, and I encourage you to study it, but it won't solve your problem if you lack the ear and experience.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Oct 29, 2013,