#1
Since we have neatly landed on the 2010's, I would imagine there'd already be shitloads of nice guitar training applications that offer several kinds of excercises, analyze your playing and give real time feedback. What I'm looking for would be, for example, the possibility to practice playing scales with the program analyzing your level of precision and changing tempo accordinly, and stuff like that.

I am under the impression that Rocksmith's Scale Runner mini game could be something into this direction. There's also Rock Prodigy, which I've heard is less focused on entertainment and more oriented towards really learning. No experience with that, either. And then there's the online game Guitarbots which I've dabbled a bit with, but don't really know how much help it will offer for serious practice.

I love doing scale excercises with just my dear metronome, but have noticed that the gamification of learning experiences tends to be quite efficient, so I'd really like to dive into the world of gamified guitar practice.

What's your take?
#2
what you need is a new amp

jk. i just use practice tabs on UG. It works.
Quote by jrcsgtpeppers
There shall be a stop to this madness. The battle is not over. My tasty licks aren't going anywhere.

Quote by The_Blode
^ I've just realised if you say Simple Plan's 2011 effort "Get Your Heart On!" really fast in a Southern American accent, it sounds gross. . .like sexual gross!

Quote by Necroheadbanger
Hello.
I'm looking for professional bongo-ists and triangle-ists to make a Progressive Technical Brutal Death Metal band
(will be called AxOxJxLxAxIxVxXxUxWxZxQxUxRxWxGxJxSxAxLxKxMxNxHxUxGxAxAxWxVxCxBxZxVx)
(Don't even ask what it means)


https://soundcloud.com/95dank



#4
I liked to practice scales along with backing tracks/loops I threw together on Guitar Pro, a bit more interesting than a simple metronome. You will also find all manner of backing tracks on youtube, in various keys, they can be fun and useful to practice over.

The only thing you really need to analyse the presicion and development is your own ears, and a practice log of which exercises you are playing at which BPM - better yet, record/video yourself one every few weeks to keep track of your progress and look more objectively at your playing.

And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#5
scale runner is the shit, I really want to get Rocksmith 2014.
Someone is wrong on the internet. Only you can help.

Originally Posted by Tulkas
Stairway is required on any list of anything involving the words guitar or song, I believe Congress amended the constitution in order to put it into federal law.
#6
Quote by Hydra150
I liked to practice scales along with backing tracks/loops I threw together on Guitar Pro, a bit more interesting than a simple metronome. You will also find all manner of backing tracks on youtube, in various keys, they can be fun and useful to practice over.

Yep. I use sequencers to create backing tracks, and also make use of loop pedal stuff. It's not that I want to replace regular styles of practice. I just feel like having a bit of variation.

The only thing you really need to analyse the presicion and development is your own ears, and a practice log of which exercises you are playing at which BPM - better yet, record/video yourself one every few weeks to keep track of your progress and look more objectively at your playing.

Know that, and do record myself playing. (Also been spending time in studio recently, which I feel is one of the most educating experiences for a musician.)

And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.

Yeah, but in Guitar Hero, you don't use a real guitar. In other games, you do.
#7
Quote by Basti95
I've heard good things about 'Guitar Scales Method'

Elaborate. Does it fit my description - analyzing the actual stuff you play?

Quote by KerNeL_KLuTcH
scale runner is the shit, I really want to get Rocksmith 2014.

Tell me more of your experience with it? As much details as possible please
#8
Quote by Aukikco

Yeah, but in Guitar Hero, you don't use a real guitar. In other games, you do.

That was a wee joke
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#9
Quote by Hydra150
I liked to practice scales along with backing tracks/loops I threw together on Guitar Pro, a bit more interesting than a simple metronome. You will also find all manner of backing tracks on youtube, in various keys, they can be fun and useful to practice over.

The only thing you really need to analyse the presicion and development is your own ears, and a practice log of which exercises you are playing at which BPM - better yet, record/video yourself one every few weeks to keep track of your progress and look more objectively at your playing.

And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.


Guitar Hero makes simple things hard, just play snow by the chili peppers on rock band or joker and the thief.
Someone is wrong on the internet. Only you can help.

Originally Posted by Tulkas
Stairway is required on any list of anything involving the words guitar or song, I believe Congress amended the constitution in order to put it into federal law.
#10
The best program is turn off your damn computer and use a metronome. The scales are located on your instrument, not on a screen.
#11
Quote by cdgraves
The best program is turn off your damn computer and use a metronome. The scales are located on your instrument, not on a screen.

It's nice that you read what I wrote before contributing your very insightful comment.

Yes, I am also doing scales without my computer. Lots of them. And am enjoying them.
#12
May i ask you a question? Why do you practice your scales? And how do you practice your scales?
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#13
Quote by Aukikco
Since we have neatly landed on the 2010's, I would imagine there'd already be shitloads of nice guitar training applications that offer several kinds of excercises, analyze your playing and give real time feedback. What I'm looking for would be, for example, the possibility to practice playing scales with the program analyzing your level of precision and changing tempo accordinly, and stuff like that.


Doing that would be much harder than you're making it sound, and the kind of people who are capable of writing that kind of code, on the whole don't care about shred. I think I've met one other person at my job who even really plays guitar and he's not a coder anyway.

Quote by Aukikco
What's your take?


Just running scales is pointless anyway. Learning and playing music and applying knowledge of theory to that is the way to go.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#14
Quote by Sickz
May i ask you a question? Why do you practice your scales? And how do you practice your scales?

I practice because I enjoy practice, I enjoy progress, I enjoy challenge. I of course, want to become a better player, to expand the scope of my playing, to widen my understanding and connection with the fretboard and my instruments in general.

How. Playing through scales, from different positions, with metronome, without metronome, on self-created loops, on songs that I'm listening to, when jamming with different musicians... Sometimes improvising, sometimes rigidly sticking to the scale pattern structure. I totally enjoy exploring different scales, planting the unique vibe of each scale into my muscle memory.

I don't really see how this question relates to the topic, though. It's not like I have to prove that I'm diligent enough to be allowed to want to try some gamification of my ongoing practice.
#15
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Doing that would be much harder than you're making it sound, and the kind of people who are capable of writing that kind of code, on the whole don't care about shred. I think I've met one other person at my job who even really plays guitar and he's not a coder anyway.

Well, still, the games I mentioned already do that kind of stuff. What I'm not sure of is whether the possibilities they offer are "serious enough".
#16
Quote by Aukikco


I don't really see how this question relates to the topic, though. It's not like I have to prove that I'm diligent enough to be allowed to want to try some gamification of my ongoing practice.


You don't have to prove anything. I just wanted to ask you what your reason for practicing scales were. I ask the same question everytime i get a new student on bass or guitar, and most times they can't answer the question, they think knowing scales = knowing the instrument/music, which isn't true.

I asked cause the reasons you gave to why you are practicing scales, are not exclusive to practicing scales. Arguably, you'd get more progress working out tunes and working on your ear, in my opinion.

I am just curious to how people value and practice scales. 'Cause to be honest we are probably the only ones that view scales as the holy grail of music. I am very active in the local jazz/instrumental scene, and i see no other instrumentalists but guitarists that emphasis scale practice. The whole thing just seems a tad funny to me.

I am not saying "don't practice scales", i am asking what results you are striving for with it. There is a quote, but i can't remember who said it. "As you practice, you play", if you just practice playing through scales/positions etc, that's what your spontaneous playing will become. I think it would be much more productive to just put on a loop of a chord or chord progression and try to think of lines in your head and then trying to play them, there is your scale practice, together with improvisation.

Just my 2 cents, i won't waste your time anymore.
Best Regards
Sickz
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#17
Quote by Aukikco
It's nice that you read what I wrote before contributing your very insightful comment.

Yes, I am also doing scales without my computer. Lots of them. And am enjoying them.


You don't need software to use scales effectively. You need to engage your ears and work with actual music. Doing fancy practice on scales will only yield so much benefit when it comes to playing actual music. Varying tempos and coming up with new exercise is something you can do for yourself, and you'll be a better musician for the effort.

If you're really curious, go ahead and check out the software. But if you're like most people, your practice time is limited, and you'll get the best use of it when you do things with just you and your guitar. Use the knowledge you have to analyze your own weak spots and come up with appropriate exercises. The best exercises you can do are the ones that address your specific problems.


If you're serious about taking on challenges, spend one hour a day on technique (scales, arpeggios, chords, chromatic exercises, finger isolation, LH/RH focus) and at least one more hour on actual music.
Last edited by cdgraves at Oct 29, 2013,