#1
So I got a new amp. Yea I know, I buy and sell a lot. Mostly due to the rent and college bills!

It's a Peavey Combo 300, from the 80's. Still in A+ condition, and has cool casters, though im thinking of nixing the casters and getting a crate carrier. Versatile sound and loud! I love it. Reviews say its built like a tank and will last through anything. I hope they're right.

In looking for a cab to match up with the combo's 15 inch black widow speaker (this sucker is 2 ohm stable!) I stumbled upon the question: Why do some amps have XLR outputs and some have 1/4? Mine, being so old, has a 1/4, but maybe I should look into getting an adapter?
...it was bright as the sun, but with ten times the heat
#2
XLR is what is called a 'balanced' connection, whilst your general 6.35mm jacks are 'unbalanced.'

Balanced connections have three pins- positive, negative and ground. Before the signal is output, circuitry will create a 'negative' version of the signal, which is sent down the negative pin. Assuming the receiving equipment has balanced circuitry, what happens is that the positive and the negative signals are superimposed, and any signal that is common to both pins is removed.

This isn't exactly how it works, but it should illustrate the point. Say the signal is a constant 100Hz. The positive pin sends 100Hz, the negative pin sends -100Hz. But there's some interference at 70Hz picked up by the cable. As this 70Hz is on both the positive and negative signals, the receiving equipment will remove it. It's very useful in studios.
#3
If you're talking about connecting speakers, are you sure you aren't mixing up XLR with Speakon?
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#4
XLR can be used for low power amplification, but you aren't really going to see that in this application.

Speakon is rated for 30A RMS, which is a lot higher than 1/4", is a locking system, don't short out when being connected/disconnected, and don't show any metal components, makng it nigh on impossible to be shocked whilst handling one.
#5
Yea, I knew I got it wrong. Speakon is what I was thinking of! What's all that 30A RMS gibberish mean?
...it was bright as the sun, but with ten times the heat
#7
Quote by c3powil
Yea, I knew I got it wrong. Speakon is what I was thinking of! What's all that 30A RMS gibberish mean?


RMS is root means squared (kind of functions like an average). 30A is referring to ampere, which measures current.
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#9
XD

I've been away from the bass forum for too long. Getting schooled.

Any reason I should convert to speakon, or just keep the 1/4 output-input gig?
...it was bright as the sun, but with ten times the heat
#11
Never heard of anyone getting shocked because of a 1/4 lead, but I just might be too out of the loop. The amp only has a 1/4 output. Is it easy to convert?
...it was bright as the sun, but with ten times the heat
#12
Speakon cables are locking, so there is no chance of it being pulled out of your amp during use. This prevents the potential to short out (fry) your amp, or for you to simply lose sound while playing. They're also a more rugged and durable design. It wouldn't be a deal-breaker for me, but Speakon is definitely a better design, personally I always try and get it where available (neither my current amp nor my current cab even have any 1/4" jack speaker connections).
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#14
Quote by Deliriumbassist
^it's possible that the centre hole of the speakon socket can actually take a 1/4". My Ashdown Little Giant allows for that.


Interesting, didn't know that. I don't think my Barefaced is like that as you have to specifically request jack functionality if you want it, not sure about my Shuttle head.
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