#1
Hello, hello. Eventually I'll have to decide whether I want to go study music at a four year school after getting an associate's in music next semester. However, other than the lessons I've been taking at school, I don't really play in standard tuning. Perfect fourths tuning (EADGCF) is just easier for me and makes more sense to me, and I just prefer it over standard. Reading music even comes easier in fourths. The only reason I'm not taking lessons in all fourths tuning right now is because the teacher I was assigned either can't or won't work with it , which I get.

I was just curious if anyone knew if one could study guitar at a four year school (not necessarily a music college, just as a music major) without using standard tuning? Maybe someone here knows first hand? I'd appreciate an answer, I'd rather not have to struggle relearning the guitar in standard tuning to the level where I'm currently at in a different tuning. Thanks!
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#2
Yeah, they'll definitely go with Standard unless a piece calls for something different. I don't know if you're taking classical, but classical guitar without a B string is impossible given that most everything is written with the idea that there is an open B string.
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#3
Quote by rockingamer2
Yeah, they'll definitely go with Standard unless a piece calls for something different. I don't know if you're taking classical, but classical guitar without a B string is impossible given that most everything is written with the idea that there is an open B string.



No, I don't play classical. I'm a jazz player. I understand that standard tuning is the standard, but you're saying that no, there's no flexibility when it comes to tuning? Even when another tuning gets the job done?
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#4
Quote by ProtoCosmos
No, I don't play classical. I'm a jazz player. I understand that standard tuning is the standard, but you're saying that no, there's no flexibility when it comes to tuning? Even when another tuning gets the job done?

Ah, I'm not familiar with jazz teaching. Practically, why would a teacher want to deal with a new tuning for one student purely because it's his preference? Also, that m3 interval between the third and second strings is there pretty much to make chord work easier. Seeing as you're going for jazz, it seems like you're making things harder on yourself.
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#5
I'm 99.9% sure that you will have to play in standard. The university will most likely not cater to something like perfect 4ths tuning
#7
Perfect fourths is a less versatile tuning for playing chords, that's all.
#8
If you're a jazz player, that means comping chords. And that means, the prof would have to adjust (mentally, since I doubt most profs are going to retune for just you) chords every time he has lessons with you. So, while some profs may be willing to do it, they'll find it a giant pain. Point is, just suck it up and play in standard. If have a 2nd guitar, then tune that in fourths.
#9
I am going to go against everyone else here and say it's totally viable for someone that is studying jazz in school to use it, if you are prepared to do some extra work.

I study jazz as well, and some of my friends that are studying master degrees in improvisation (jazz course) tune to fourths. It does not limit them when comping (cause after all, when you are comping jazz you don't want big chords, you want small voicings) and it helps them with reading sheet music etc.

They are still using fourths tuning in school, they know that everything we are given is for standard tuning, so they have to find it for themselves in their tuning, but thats never been a problem.

What i am saying is that there are a lot of people that use fourths tuning when playing jazz in school, but you have to be prepared to do some extra work since everything will be written for standard tuning.

Check out the video meet up between David Walliman and Tom Quayle on youtube, Tom talks abit about going to study jazz and using fourths tuning. Can't remember what the clip is called though.

Hope that was to any help
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#10
Think of it this way...how do you teach a class of students if one person is in a different tuning? You would be "that guy"
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#11
Nothing is written in standard tuning, we all read the same music. You just have to play it slightly differently than someone who is in standard. I don't think it's any extra work for the person playing in fourths, but it isn't the nicest thing to do to your professor.
#12
a private teacher would be a way to investigate "special tunings" .. in jazz many players have used 4ths in limited ways in their playing...piano players in particular have used them effectivley..mccoy tyner and bill evans come to mind..herbie hancocks use of suspended chords changed alot of players approach to chordal harmony..

i have seen guitar players change tunings on the fly...and adjust their playing accordingly..it made me want to just burn my guitar..
Last edited by wolflen at Oct 30, 2013,
#13
It should be fine to use alternate tunings, however it may be easier for you to play in standard if certain chords are called for.

I understand the resistance to standard tuning, but if you want to be a professional musician you should be the versatile one.
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