#2
Off the top of my head, I would say its headless and more ergonomically shaped than a standard 7 or super-strat styled guitar. On the body styling, they are also unique. There are many (read: thousands) of super-strat guitars, but I feel a Strandberg has a very distinct shape.

And Boden's are only like $2500 base iirc
Caution:
This post may contain my opinion and/or inaccurate information.

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#3
The extra 500 can go for booze but seriously, aside from the body shape, what else differentiates it?

Also, I've been reading up on true temperament frets, and I've been wondering if you can change tunings up and down on one? Say you order a 6 string guitar with the baritone version of the system, and tune it to B. What happens if you drop it down to A? Or set it to drop A?
#4
Also check out the "Endurneck" on Strandbergs....it looks so tasty!
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#5
Strictly 7 is shit and you aren't buying a Daemoness for 3000 anytime soon. I just sold a USED one for 3700.

His waitlist is three years now and after tax you're looking at 4000-4500
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#6
Quote by Stealthtastic

His waitlist is three years now and after tax you're looking at 4000-4500

This isn't the Strandberg built ones. The production models are made in USA and have a significantly shorter wait list and a lower price.
Things with strings:
Ibanez J.Custom, Prestiges, RG8, SR5 bass etc
LP's, Strat, Tele
Noiseboxes:
ENGL Retro Tube 50
5150 III 50W
Orange Terror Bass
#7
He is talking about Dylan.


Though you can get a basic one from about $3200 new. Its only ones with crazy inlays that are massive money.

Personally I would only buy a 'real' Stranberg. People slated S7 and even the newer Washburn ones there have been reports of crappy jobs.

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#8
Quote by GS LEAD 5
The extra 500 can go for booze but seriously, aside from the body shape, what else differentiates it?

Also, I've been reading up on true temperament frets, and I've been wondering if you can change tunings up and down on one?


Not sure what true temperament frets have to do with fan fret guitars. Not the same thing, of course.
#9
Quote by Tom 1.0
He is talking about Dylan.


Though you can get a basic one from about $3200 new. Its only ones with crazy inlays that are massive money.

Personally I would only buy a 'real' Stranberg. People slated S7 and even the newer Washburn ones there have been reports of crappy jobs.


Same here
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UV7PWH
#10
Quote by GS LEAD 5


Also, I've been reading up on true temperament frets, and I've been wondering if you can change tunings up and down on one? Say you order a 6 string guitar with the baritone version of the system, and tune it to B. What happens if you drop it down to A? Or set it to drop A?


I think It would work fine. The intonation is only affected by the length of the string, not the tightness (pitch) of it.
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#12
I really want to try one of those endurneckers. It LOOKS like it would lend itself to playing with ones thumb in a proper position without your hand getting tired. Which of course would make you play better. I feel like a lot of things are preference when it comes to guitar, but the endurneck seems like you'd almost have to sound better once you got used to it. maybe. I dunno I never even touched one.
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#13
I'm honestly not familiar with Strandberg, but with the kind of money you're going to drop on a guitar, I would look into having a a guitar custom built to your specs. A good friend of mine dropped around $2,000 on a custom built Tele from a luthier shop in our region, and it's just a fantastic guitar. One of the biggest upsides of taking this route is that you'll likely be able to be part of the building process and be able to try out different specifications before you get the finished product.
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#14
Given half a chance, I would love to get a proper custom by a good luthier, thing is there is nothing where I come from. There are a few local makers, but their stuff isn't even on par with cheap LTD and Ibanez starter packs.

Basically I want to get a goodly guitar, a sort of one-size-fits-all guitar, an 8 string specifically, and I'm willing to splash a bit of cash. However, USD 3k is about the upper end of what I expect to be able to spend when I do get down to the business of getting it (which isn't anytime soon but hey, I've been out of the gear circuit for a while now, so don't have much idea of guitars past the 800 or so dollar mark).
#15
Given half a chance, I would love to get a proper custom by a good luthier, thing is there is nothing where I come from.


I'm in Texas, and I deal with luthiers in New York and Illinois. Yeah, I know they're in the same country but they're not close- 937 miles by car to the guy in Illinois and something like 1,500 miles o the other.

With that in mind, you might check around to see who is making guitars in Indonesia, Korea, Australia or New Zealand. Maybe even an American.
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#16
Quote by GS LEAD 5
Given half a chance, I would love to get a proper custom by a good luthier, thing is there is nothing where I come from. There are a few local makers, but their stuff isn't even on par with cheap LTD and Ibanez starter packs.

Basically I want to get a goodly guitar, a sort of one-size-fits-all guitar, an 8 string specifically, and I'm willing to splash a bit of cash.


If you're going to get a custom, there are two things to consider. One is, "What, exactly, do I want on that guitar that I can't get on a production guitar?" and the second is, "What kind of woods do I want on it?"

There are also "semi-customs." Carvin is a "semi-custom" company in that there are a range of guitar models, body shapes, etc., but you can order them with a long laundry list of options. Rondo Music has Agile "semi-customs" available along the same lines, but offers a different set of options, including choices of scale lengths, etc.

If you're looking for 8-string guitars, both companies offer them, but Rondo (surprisingly enough) offers more fan fret and straight fret versions, pickup choices, etc. and fewer wood/cosmetic options.

If you're looking for extended range guitars such as an eight, you might wander over to seven-string dot org and see what they can help you with as well.