#1
You know those days where you just cant play as well as the day before or you need to try really hard, unfortunately it happens to almost everyone every now and then.

% wise how much do you feel your technical ability drops?

Personally I would say about 10-15% on really bad days, what about the rest of you?
#2
No idea..
It feels like I'm crap, but if you push through and play you realise it's not too bad.
This is why you practice hard - so that you can play well on your off-days.
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#3
About the same as you mate. That is why i always push the tempo a little higher on everything i practice, so that i can play it at a higher tempo on a good day, so on an off day i can play it at the original tempo.
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#4
trying to quantify something like this is both pointless and impossible
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#5
Quote by steven seagull
trying to quantify something like this is both pointless and impossible


This would be my reaction to this as well. The only thing that matters is whether your bad days are good enough or not. That is intentionally vague.
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#6
Quote by steven seagull
trying to quantify something like this is both pointless and impossible


that's what i was thinking. bit like putting percentages on how much each piece of guitar kit affects tone.

all i know is i'm just worse on bad days.
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#8
yes, it is impossible because your ability to play the guitar isn't defined by numbers and factors you can measure.

but more to the point it's a waste of time.
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#9
Quote by tappooh
Its not impossible, test your speed/accuracy on a good day and on a bad day and you will see the difference...


No, you will see a difference. If that's the way in which you're having a bad day anyway. For me bad days aren't any slower but they feel worse; it feels harder to get my hands to do what I want. It's also when I can't improvise very well. They're also when I can't seem to lock in to a rhythm. They're also when I can't get things by ear very well.

There are a million different types of bad day, only one of them can be measured and most people would probably say that it's the least important kind of bad day anyway.
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#10
Enough for me to put the guitar down and sit on the forums instead.
#11
No matter how badly you play, your chops are at 100% when you perform. Your "best" is only what you can do when it actually matters.

Your chops are not just about speed, but being able to play what you want/need reliably. That's why it's important to give them attention regularly. Rather than working on flashy techniques, you'll get much more mileage from practicing the basics rigorously. Easily 90% of what any professional guitarist plays requires only confident execution of basic techniques.


Think of it this way: are your chops good or bad if you can play "Eruption" note-for-note, but mess up the chords in "Sweet Home Alabama"?
Last edited by cdgraves at Oct 30, 2013,
#12
I think it is different for everyone like Zaphod said, for some it might be harder to focus on the chord changes, others might lose some accuracy/speed, others might not improvise as well, others might not be able to write new songs.

In the OP I stated I was talking about technical ability and I think Sickz has got a point... practice whatever you play at a faster tempo so that when you are not at 100% you would still be able to play at the original tempo. Hell I never tought of that... =.=
#13
I only know that on my off days my ability drops. As Zaphod said it can be anything from stuff being harder to play, my improvisation isn't as creative as usual or i can't seem to lock in with a certain rhythm or the band i am playing with.

You can't really measure it, all you can do is try to work on it so even on your off days you can do what is needed of you. That's why i always push myself a bit over the original tempo when practicing something, i look into more ideas when it comes to improvisation and i sit and count different meters and rhythms that are hard to me.

Everything you do should be done so it becomes more natural, your goal with everything should be to be able not to think about it and just play.
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#14
Quote by tappooh
I think it is different for everyone like Zaphod said, for some it might be harder to focus on the chord changes, others might lose some accuracy/speed, others might not improvise as well, others might not be able to write new songs.

In the OP I stated I was talking about technical ability and I think Sickz has got a point... practice whatever you play at a faster tempo so that when you are not at 100% you would still be able to play at the original tempo. Hell I never tought of that... =.=


I did that. Now I mess up more at the proper speed and it is more difficult now to maintain proper tempo. As always YMMV.
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#15
Quote by tappooh
In the OP I stated I was talking about technical ability and I think Sickz has got a point... practice whatever you play at a faster tempo so that when you are not at 100% you would still be able to play at the original tempo. Hell I never tought of that... =.=


Speed has precious little to do with your overall technique. You need to practice slowly and make every motion graceful, and every note meaningful.

If you're having trouble playing something at the normal tempo, practicing it faster will only make your mistakes worse.
#16
It is not necessary that your ability drops at all, it may as well be just subjective filling that you are worse than normally.

Professional players know that even if they are not filling like playing they usually can pull it off in front of the audience without anyone noticing that they are not into it
#17
My performance gets 2 times worse... I'm not sure if you consider that 50 or 100%..
#18
Quote by atza
It is not necessary that your ability drops at all, it may as well be just subjective filling that you are worse than normally.

Professional players know that even if they are not filling like playing they usually can pull it off in front of the audience without anyone noticing that they are not into it


You mean "feeling"?

Part of being a professional is being "into it" even when it's lame. There's no faking interest in what you're doing.

Either way, feeling doesn't really affect your chops. If anything, it's easier to play fast when you're not feeling it because you can kinda stand back and think about what you're doing.

There's kind of a sweet spot between emotive and intellectual playing - The Zone - where you can play very intensely and still keep track of what's going on musically. Developing solid technique makes this mode of performance more accessible.
#20
Hard to say. I've been playing for many years, and noodle and practice quite often, so I almost never feel like I'm having a bad music day.
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#21
Quote by dgonz
Hard to say. I've been playing for many years, and noodle and practice quite often, so I almost never feel like I'm having a bad music day.


Maybe it's because you don't push yourself to the limits?
#22
That depends on what you consider the "limit". I can, and do, play pretty much anything I want musically. For most gigs with my main band, we do a lot of rock, pop, blues, and I like to be creative with the arrangement of songs, adding extra guitar layers, and putting in solos and fills when I can, but not being obnoxious and overdoing it. Other than an occasional flub here and there, which I correct instantly, I can't remember when I've thought that I've played bad for any performance. Not in a decade or so of hundreds of paying shows of all levels, even speed metal back in the day. This is the same for acoustic solo performances as well, where I'm playing various styles including Hedges, McKee, DeGrassi and those types of tunes.

Can I work on playing better and faster? Sure, and I do. But, to answer your question, I've pushed myself to the limits, for years, on guitar/sax/bass, in various styles. At this point, unless I'm trying to do some highly-technical, very unorthodox musical piece that I'm not familiar with at all, I don't really have any problem just playing the right way. Sorry if that somehow offends you, or you can't believe it.
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#24
Quote by dgonz
That depends on what you consider the "limit". I can, and do, play pretty much anything I want musically. For most gigs with my main band, we do a lot of rock, pop, blues, and I like to be creative with the arrangement of songs, adding extra guitar layers, and putting in solos and fills when I can, but not being obnoxious and overdoing it. Other than an occasional flub here and there, which I correct instantly, I can't remember when I've thought that I've played bad for any performance. Not in a decade or so of hundreds of paying shows of all levels, even speed metal back in the day. This is the same for acoustic solo performances as well, where I'm playing various styles including Hedges, McKee, DeGrassi and those types of tunes.

Can I work on playing better and faster? Sure, and I do. But, to answer your question, I've pushed myself to the limits, for years, on guitar/sax/bass, in various styles. At this point, unless I'm trying to do some highly-technical, very unorthodox musical piece that I'm not familiar with at all, I don't really have any problem just playing the right way. Sorry if that somehow offends you, or you can't believe it.


No dude I'm sorry if I offended you. That was just a suggestion for a reason of your perfect performances. You know almost every musician/guitarist out there has had a crap public performance. While it may not be technically crap, it sure as hell has not been up to the expectations. (Can't explain this further my English won't allow me, I hope you can get my point).