#1
I'm not sure if this is advice or a question. A little of both i suppose.
I added rocksmith to my routine. I'm an analytical type who has been reading about guitar theory in my spare time so i'm not concerned about that aspect of using rocksmith but i am wondering if i'm going to miss out on important techniques. I would like to describe a few successes so that you'll understand where i'm coming from.

Higher ground - i was playing each note on the downstroke at first. Eventually realized that i could move my hand less if i played upstrokes too.

That jenny o song - took me a while to realize that the first three notes are the same as the notes in the chord that comes later (a d7?) I could've been making a chord shape and playing them easy but instead i was trying to move my fingers around quickly.

And i still don't know a good way to ensure that i'm getting the right string or fret when i need to. Sometimes the song has me playing on B and high E a lot and then all of a sudden it wants me to hit the a string. I miss it about half the time. There's gotta be a system for positioning your hand or something? I have similar troubles moving up the neck - like from fret 5 up to 12 or so. System? Or just keep doing it till it clicks?
#2
First time poster, but have some experience with Rocksmith

the new 2014 edition has recommended fingerings that will help. One of the problems with the game is that as it builds up the difficulty, your fingerings may change as the extra notes are added (as you found) makes it difficult to learn the song, but isn't that different from learning from text tabs, where a bit of guess work is needed.

String skipping and moving around the neck are things that come with time and practice. There are plenty of string skipping exercises around, but for a fun one, and adding a song to your repertoire if it's not there already is Gn'Rs Sweet Child o' Mine, the opening and chorus/pre-solo sections are string skipping exercises that they turned into a song.

For moving around the neck, I sometimes find that playing the notes and chords in a different place is easier. You can play them the way the game shows you for some flair, and because (iirc) that is where the original artists play the notes, so will give the same sort of tones (ie Open A and A on the 5th fret of bottom E sound slightly different). However, if it's giving you difficulty you can play it and easier way, and as you feel more confident with the song or your ability improves, you can change it up later. Your are adding to your skill set, and knowledge of the fret board.
#3
Rocksmith is a game, simple as, a game that uses a guitar as a controller. It's fun to play and will introduce you to new music. It's also a really good tool for keeping yourself motivated and to build on what you've been learning, especially if you don't have anyone else to jam with.

What it isn't going to do is teach you how to play the guitar, it's no substitute for a teacher or even good online lessons like justinguitar.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#4
Agree completely. Meant to add that to my post too. I use it to keep motivated when I can't think of exercises, and to have a laugh with friends when they come over.
#5
I started out with justin guitar and i still use it but there are things that i was practicing without having any proper context as to why it's important. For example one of the early justin guitar lessons is the a minor pentatonic. If i recall correctly the website gave a basic explanation that it would be a good finger exercise and i think it might have said something along the lines of "used in blues a lot" which i interpreted as "not a rock thing therefore disregard this" I dutifully practiced that for about a month and a half and i did improve somewhat but i never really understood why i was doing it.

I did eventually do some research and if i understand this correctly it appears that the exercises are the basis for soloing?

I am not a great communicator. I don't express myself well enough and i don't hear people well enough. I often find myself having to choose between asking a million questions and making myself feel like a nuisance or to ask none at all and hope i can figure it out on my own.
That is why i am in love with rocksmith. I can simply play the songs it tells me to play and enjoy the feeling that i'm making music. It's an educational approach that makes sense to me and i've always reacted better to doing things than listening to explanations. The rocksmith developers compared their game to the montessori method of teaching and i was actually enrolled in a montessori school when i was little. It feels like i've been shaped to learn most effectively through those methods.

All the same there's obviously a missing element that isn't necessarily going to be filled by a teacher. I think that what i need is a comprehensive reference of common techniques that i can read through. Even better would be a comprehensive reference that addresses the particular songs that are in the game.

I would've asked for that in the first place if i had thought about it. As i said - i'm not the best communicator.
#6
The minor pentatonic scale isn't an finger exercise, it's a scale - a collection of sounds that are known to work well together. More precisely, it's the natural minor scale with the 2nd and 6th degrees omitted, these tend to be the more difficult scale degrees to work with. Justinguitar may possibly not have explained it very well, but Rocksmith certainly won't.

The minor pentatonic is used in soloing a lot precisely for that reason, the "why" is that as a collection of sounds it's fairly safe to work with - the likelihood of hitting an off-note is greatly reduced when you take the half-steps out of the equation. You still can't just go around hitting notes at random though, you still need to listen to what you're playing over and try and choose your notes accordingly. Always bear in mind that sound is the most important factor when choosing what to play, not mechanics or sight. Also it's worth pointing out that rock is pretty much a direct descendent of blues and many rock solos are little more than dirtier, angrier blues solos - with that in mind the minor pentatonic is extremely useful for a rock guitarist as many of the solos you'll learn will use it.

There's no "quick fixes" when it comes to learning to play the guitar, if there's gaps in your knowledge it'll take a lot more than a cheat sheet to fill them adequately.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#8
There's nothing wrong with Rocksmith, if it gets you using the guitar that's all that matters. Obviously you're not going to use it for the rest of your life so there's no problems. Use whatever you can use which will get you spending time on the guitar. When you feel you've exhausted everything you believe you can learn from Rocksmith then move on.

As for the things you mentioned which you're finding difficulty with. Such as moving around the neck of the guitar, this is down to the fact that you don't have enough time playing the instrument.
#9
Quote by steven seagull
The minor pentatonic scale isn't an finger exercise, it's a scale - a collection of sounds that are known to work well together. More precisely, it's the natural minor scale with the 2nd and 6th degrees omitted, these tend to be the more difficult scale degrees to work with. Justinguitar may possibly not have explained it very well, but Rocksmith certainly won't.

The minor pentatonic is used in soloing a lot precisely for that reason, the "why" is that as a collection of sounds it's fairly safe to work with - the likelihood of hitting an off-note is greatly reduced when you take the half-steps out of the equation. You still can't just go around hitting notes at random though, you still need to listen to what you're playing over and try and choose your notes accordingly. Always bear in mind that sound is the most important factor when choosing what to play, not mechanics or sight. Also it's worth pointing out that rock is pretty much a direct descendent of blues and many rock solos are little more than dirtier, angrier blues solos - with that in mind the minor pentatonic is extremely useful for a rock guitarist as many of the solos you'll learn will use it.

There's no "quick fixes" when it comes to learning to play the guitar, if there's gaps in your knowledge it'll take a lot more than a cheat sheet to fill them adequately.



I'm not asking for quick fixes. Thanks for trying to explain. I still don't know what to do with it, but I trust that it'll eventually become clear.
#10
I know it's "cool" around here to bash rocksmith (how dare other people get good at guitar!), but the new rocksmith is exactly what you need. First, I'll explain the importance of that scale, then why rocksmith 2014 is the best way for you to learn to use it.

First off, the minor pentatonic scale is the most common scale in blues, rock, and metal. It's hard to explain the "why" but in laymen's terms (I assume you don't know theory) the pentatonic scale is the most "powerful" sounding scale. All the notes sound strong and they work off each other well enough. Minor scales (such as minor pentatonic), sound "sad" or "moody". So the minor pentatonic is full of notes that convey a certain strength as well as depth of emotion (especially when adding the blues note, IMO).

Now onto the new rocksmith and how it can help you. In rocksmith 2014, there is a mode called "session mode". In this mode you select several other instruments to back you, pick any key, and tell the drummer what BPM to start at. After that, the band follows your lead. There is no easier way (unless you have access to a full band) to get better at jamming than playing session mode in rocksmith. This will help you greatly while trying to learn why and how to use the pentatonic minor scale.

On top of it all, rocksmith will show you the scale across the entire fretboard while you jam. I really don't get all the rocksmith hate, it's just a tool to make you better at guitar. I wonder if people were this angry when metronomes came out?
#11
Quote by hansome21
I really don't get all the rocksmith hate, it's just a tool to make you better at guitar. I wonder if people were this angry when metronomes came out?


Judging from the first Rocksmith (which I bought on day one of release), I think it's because it's advertised as 'the fastest way to learn guitar', when it really is not. At it's core, it's interactive tablature. There's very very brief videos covering technique but you learn very little theory and music.

I think it's a great way to learn new songs, but that's about it. I've only played session mode at a gaming expo and it is a good way to learn to jam, but it pretty much just sticks a scale/box in front of you while the 'band' plays along.

Note that I've only played the first Rocksmith and not the final version of Rocksmith 2014, so some things may have changed since then.
Gear:
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Godin Velocity
Peavey Vypyr 15 Watt
AMT WH1 Japanese Girl Wah
Marshall BB-2 Boost/OD
Joyo JF-07 Classic Flanger
Joyo JF-37 Analog Chorus
#12
Quote by hansome21
I know it's "cool" around here to bash rocksmith (how dare other people get good at guitar!), but the new rocksmith is exactly what you need. First, I'll explain the importance of that scale, then why rocksmith 2014 is the best way for you to learn to use it.

First off, the minor pentatonic scale is the most common scale in blues, rock, and metal. It's hard to explain the "why" but in laymen's terms (I assume you don't know theory) the pentatonic scale is the most "powerful" sounding scale. All the notes sound strong and they work off each other well enough. Minor scales (such as minor pentatonic), sound "sad" or "moody". So the minor pentatonic is full of notes that convey a certain strength as well as depth of emotion (especially when adding the blues note, IMO).

Now onto the new rocksmith and how it can help you. In rocksmith 2014, there is a mode called "session mode". In this mode you select several other instruments to back you, pick any key, and tell the drummer what BPM to start at. After that, the band follows your lead. There is no easier way (unless you have access to a full band) to get better at jamming than playing session mode in rocksmith. This will help you greatly while trying to learn why and how to use the pentatonic minor scale.

On top of it all, rocksmith will show you the scale across the entire fretboard while you jam. I really don't get all the rocksmith hate, it's just a tool to make you better at guitar. I wonder if people were this angry when metronomes came out?


I get the hate. That's the easiest thing to understand. Short version - jealousy mixed with healthy doses of nostalgia. People tend to remember difficult things fondly once they're past them. Ask me about Boot camp and I'll tell you it wasn't that bad. But you'd have gotten a different answer if you'd asked me in the middle of the second week there.

But those people know that nostalgia and jealousy aren't good reasons to diss a new learning tool so they seek out failure stories so that they can affirm to themselves that the new method is flawed, because it's comforting to think that the new method is flawed.

I'd bet that for every person who has picked up bad habits from Rocksmith there's a thousand others who picked up bad habits for other reasons. Some of those people are now famous for the way they play the guitar. I myself failed to learn the guitar when i was younger. Twice actually. My uncle gave me an acoustic guitar and taught me how to play G, C, D as well as tune it to itself. Later my best friend gave me his starter bass and a tablature book. I learned very little from those experiences.

I've got no doubt that Rocksmith is the best way to get started. I can tell that my hands are becoming more dextrous. In one week i made noticeable progress toward improving my pinky stretches and i started to be able to get the open notes in the thunderstruck intro (every now and then.)
I also learned that it's easier to pick quickly if you angle the pick downward and i have been getting much more accurate about finding the proper fret without having to look down. I'm starting to make progress on hearing the difference between the notes and i can sometimes tell if i'm off by a fret by recognizing that the note sounds flat rather than relying on the scoring system.

I love theory. I have read more of it than i understand right now. I just can't fully appreciate the theory until i can play it a little bit. It's good to learn that the minor pentatonic is used for soloing and why but what i really need to do is to play songs that use the pentatonic. I've probably played a few of them by now, in large part because Rocksmith makes it easy to introduce myself to new things. I do like the words that you used to describe the minor pentatonic. Powerful, sad and moody. That's cool.

In the meantime i'll keep at it. I know i need to put some miles on my fingertips before i can play the things i want to be able to play. I'd like to make sure my rocksmith time is spent efficiently but if the best i can do is to pluck lots of notes then that's what i'll do. I'm sure i'll have more insightful questions to ask in another couple of months.
#13
Rocksmith still doesn't teach you "how to play the guitar". I think it's a great innovation and definitely will play a part in keeping you motivated and ensuring learnign the guitar stays fun. It doesn't replace traditional lessons though, but it can certainly complement them and will arguably make them more effective.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#14
Quote by steven seagull
Rocksmith still doesn't teach you "how to play the guitar". I think it's a great innovation and definitely will play a part in keeping you motivated and ensuring learnign the guitar stays fun. It doesn't replace traditional lessons though, but it can certainly complement them and will arguably make them more effective.


So I've been going back and forth for the last three years on learning guitar. My dad is a guitar nut (has more guitars than shirts lol) and has wanted me to learn forever. Well I finally feel motivated to learn guitar. I know a few basic chords I strum at but thats it. I'm planning on taking lessons very soon (my dad isn't the best music teacher. lol But it'll be fun to jam with him when I am better).

My question is, if I buy this game and start playing it before I take lessons (I am starting lessons in two weeks) will I develop any bad habits or anything like that? Or could it warm me up for lessons?
#15
Quote by Max727
So I've been going back and forth for the last three years on learning guitar. My dad is a guitar nut (has more guitars than shirts lol) and has wanted me to learn forever. Well I finally feel motivated to learn guitar. I know a few basic chords I strum at but thats it. I'm planning on taking lessons very soon (my dad isn't the best music teacher. lol But it'll be fun to jam with him when I am better).

My question is, if I buy this game and start playing it before I take lessons (I am starting lessons in two weeks) will I develop any bad habits or anything like that? Or could it warm me up for lessons?


You could very well develop some bad habits, you might not. Whether you do or not isn't really dependent on the game since it, as far as I'm aware, doesn't actually teach you how to play the guitar; it just shows you what to play.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#16
Quote by Max727
So I've been going back and forth for the last three years on learning guitar. My dad is a guitar nut (has more guitars than shirts lol) and has wanted me to learn forever. Well I finally feel motivated to learn guitar. I know a few basic chords I strum at but thats it. I'm planning on taking lessons very soon (my dad isn't the best music teacher. lol But it'll be fun to jam with him when I am better).

My question is, if I buy this game and start playing it before I take lessons (I am starting lessons in two weeks) will I develop any bad habits or anything like that? Or could it warm me up for lessons?


Buy it.

I don't have any problem with steven seagull's pronouncement that it won't teach you to play guitar, but no method can teach you to play the guitar if your fingers won't move the way you need them to move. Playing the game is a way to do finger exercises that don't bore the crap outta ya. You also have a teacher available. I say play the game for a week or two, note what's difficult and ask questions about it. Most of the "bad habit" stuff can be avoided if you pay attention.

Here's an example of something that i was starting to do wrong:
(Nirvana's Breed has a few arrangements and they change with difficulty levels, so what i'm playing isn't necessarily what a tab would show
The game had me playing 3rd fret on the low E string, then open, then 5th fret. As you get better the game adds more notes and eventually changes some of the single notes to double-stops and/or chords.
I was using my pointer and ring finger to go from 3rd to 5th fret, but the following section changes the pattern, replacing the note on the 3rd fret (G) with a second fret F#/Gb.

I don't know about you but there's no way my hand could stretch far enough to use the pointer and ring finger to play notes on frets 2 and 5. I had to move my hand around a lot and i still missed tons of notes.

So i failed to play that properly for a while until i changed my methods. I tried keeping my pointer finger on fret 2, using middle finger and pinky finger for the first section and pointer finger and pinky for the second section. Worked a lot better. I later went into the technique section and found out that the game tells you the best hand position to use. It had a white line under the fretboard showing exactly where to put your fingers.
#17
I think if your dad already plays, he can probably help steer you away from bad habits that the game cannot recognise (like hand position, or not being relaxed). It can teach you things of how to play like a youtube video can, as it has a good number of video lessons from the basics of putting the strap on the guitar, to tapping and pinch harmonics.

I'd recommend the 2014 version. it's been up dated with a few more bits and pieces. Like recommended fingerings, so instead of just having a line to say where your hand should be i.e. index on 2nd fret for an open G, it actually will show the fingering for the chord over the shape. The lessons in 2014 also have a better recognition of what you have likely done wrong, and will go back and offer advice to correct it, instead of just hopping back to have you play the note again.

There are more customisable options too, for building up the riffs.

It's still mostly a tool to learn songs, and run through exercises, and is best used as an addition to an 'in the flesh' teacher, to help you learn what it cannot teach.

The session mode is pretty cool too, the band will keep playing as long as you do, if you stop, they will too (they wind down) then will start back up when you do.

They've taken a bit of the game element away as well, there doesn't seem to be the progress of 'levelling up' or 'gigs to play' (that I've come across yet at least, only played on it for 2-3 hours, and mostly in the session mode), so it feels a bit more functional. It also loads so much faster than the original.

Back on topic, it can teach you some stuff, but is more of a tool still to practice what you have been taught by a physical teacher. It has a 60 day challenge that may be interesting to follow, where it suggests you play an hour a day for 60 days, and film yourself each week to see the improvement. My wife said she may try that out, as she thinks she would like to start to play guitar, but she's not sure if she wants to really do it yet, so going for a taster this way.
#18
Quote by Max727
So I've been going back and forth for the last three years on learning guitar. My dad is a guitar nut (has more guitars than shirts lol) and has wanted me to learn forever. Well I finally feel motivated to learn guitar. I know a few basic chords I strum at but thats it. I'm planning on taking lessons very soon (my dad isn't the best music teacher. lol But it'll be fun to jam with him when I am better).

My question is, if I buy this game and start playing it before I take lessons (I am starting lessons in two weeks) will I develop any bad habits or anything like that? Or could it warm me up for lessons?

Nah it's not going to teach you any bad habits, certainly not in just 2 weeks...it's a great thing to have access to while you're learning and should help keep you interested
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#20
I have Rocksmith and Rocksmith 2014 both are great.

I think they are great for learning how to play songs not so much for learning how to play guitar overall, they do show how to do everything though 2014 is easier about that though.

I think the best way of using it is to play some stuff then try to play the same stuff on an amp, and then play around with what you can do IE make up stuff on the side even if it's not good.

Have you tried the little song games where you can set the hardness of the song to easy mid and hard which changes the notes and chords you hit for a song?

I thought that was pretty good.

I have tried the session band thing it's not too bad but you'd really want to be able to play some stuff otherwise there's little point to it.

2014 has videos for all the stuff like harmonics, tapping, hammer on offs etc plus the play throughs.


As for my thoughts on tabs, I find some can be good some not so good, I've got tabs pro on my phone and I find some tabs have been made to sound just like the song would yet when you try to play them I really wonder if they can be played.

Also if a tab has been done for an acoustic guitar they may not play well on an electric guitar.
#21
You can just as easily get a teacher to show you improper hand position as you can develop from the game. Look at what it is asking you to play, think logically from position to position and you will find what position is correct, because you will transition smoother through the song.

I will be as bold to state that the naysayers of Rocksmith just think you have to suffer the same painstaking ways of learning as they did. Its jealousy and the inability to accept new technology.
Michael
2010 Gibson Les Paul Studio (Ebony w/ Gold)
Peavy Rage 158 Practice Amp
#22
I understand why some hate Rocksmith. For those who haven't played it, it looks like Rock Band 4. And without human interaction, it's true that bad habits will form. But I see some of the same people who say Rocksmith will make you form bad habits... recommending self-teachers like Justinguitar.

I get that some of the advertising makes it look like you don't even need a teacher once you have Rocksmith... but it's puffery. No teaching tool is going to tell you "Once you buy our game, we expect you to go out and spend $30 an hour on lessons."


That said, I think the best thing that Rocksmith does is that it gets you out of that initial phase when you don't have the slightest clue what you are doing, and you give up rather than keep going.

I have two electric guitars and an acoustic. All three were impulse purchase, spurred on by the mindset that I was going to definitely start playing again when I got them. Each time, I played for a week or two, gave up, and looked at them hanging on my wall for a year or two before I decided to start back up.

I've had Rocksmith since 2011 (when it came out) and kind of forgot about it for a while. In the middle of September, I started playing it again, and I vowed to practice either on my own or with Rocksmith for at least an hour a day, every day.

I finally kept my promise to myself. It shored in the ADD in me, and forced me to go up and down the neck even when I was uncomfortable doing so. When I started, I literally could play A, D, E, Am, Dm, Em, C, and G, and couldn't reliably switch from chord to chord. Now, I can hit 100% of the notes on some of the easier songs and reliably hit 80% of the notes or more on almost all of the songs on the disc and that I have downloaded.

I know I'll have to hire myself a teacher one day, but the $80 I spent on Rocksmith was dozens of times more cost-effective than learning all I have learned with a teacher, and I've gotten to a point where bad habits or not, I can actually somewhat play.
#23
For someone who already knows how to play the guitar, is it worth it? I often have trouble motivating myself to sit and learn new stuff, and plus I never have anyone to jam with.
Who are you? The prince of darkness? Don't you have any friends?


#24
My problem simply comes from a recent commercial I've seen--three different guys, all with the worst technique I think I've ever seen. I think it was supposed to be a '30 Day Challenge' to see if they could "learn to play guitar" from the game. Obviously they are still going to be extreme beginners, but if I were a guitar teacher, I would start them back at square one. I'm not even a technique Nazi and it still horrified me.

I never planned on playing the game, anyway, but I definitely wouldn't after seeing that.
Quote by SteveHouse
This thread is officially about sucking Sleaze off for a sig.


Quote by tayroar
Hey Sleaze I'll give you a blowjob if you sig me. Maybe even some nudey photos?


Quote by crazy8rgood


Sleaze, that made me lulz in my pants.


Quote by 36mikeyb36
hahaha Sleaze i'd give you my mom for that one.
#25
I just purchased Rocksmith 2014 a week ago. I've been playing guitar for a little under two years. From the start I've played almost everyday, often for hours. I started learning songs by tab, then I eventually got Guitar Pro 6 which was great and help me to actually play along to the songs I was learning. I really have a passion for the instrument so a few months ago I started taking lessons from a great teacher. I've learned a lot from him and plan to continue to take lessons from him until he has nothing left to teach me.

So anyway, I sold my beloved Peavey 6505+ combo a few weeks ago. In January I'm planning on buying a nice tube head and 4x12 cab for the, uhh, bedroom. So I needed some small practice amp to tide me over till January and I went searching for a roland micro cube at guitar center. They didn't have it and since I'm into instant gratification, I got Rocksmith 2014 for my PC.

I've come to the conclusion that I made an excellent purchase. I agree with other posters that its no replacement for a good teacher, but I think it's an excellent practice tool. Even though I've been playing for almost 2 years I've almost completely skipped perfecting the open chords and just mostly played power chords because I mostly listen to/play punk rock and metal. There's a game in Rocksmith 2014 called Starchords, where you have to strum a particular chord in order to shoot a spaceship that's trying to shoot you. As you level up it brings in more difficult chords and you need to play them faster. That little game has been addictive. It's forcing me to learn the chord names and develop the muscle memory to effortlessly switch between chords. Rocksmith 2014 also has games that incorporate scales, bends, sustains, tremolo picking, etc. So far the games look like they'll help me to practice and not just play, which is great because I have a tendency to just play the songs that I already know when I pick up my guitar.

As far as the Song learning features, I had to get used to seeing the tab come down a conveyor belt rather then reading them from right to left like I've been doing since I picked up a guitar. I'm also not too thrilled on learn a weird bare bones version of the song and leveling up to get all the notes. I just learned a song tonight by using the riff repeater feature. You can slow down any part of the song and set a difficulty level of 100 percent to get all the notes in the phrase. That seems to work better for me. I have a feeling that the riff repeater is gonna come in hand when It comes time to get my gallop up to speed on "the trooper".

The session mode is fun also. I had an "ah-ha" moment when I tried to use the Em blues scale, which my teacher has been teaching me. He's been teaching me little blues licks in this scale that are apparently very common. So I turned the session mode on and had it play a 12 bar blues in Em and just sat there and solo'ed over it for an hour! And it sound almost...passable! Well passable to my ear right now. If there's one thing that I've learned about the guitar, it's that the better you get the more you realize how much you suck! Anyways, I feel like I'm getting something out of it, and it's tiding my over till I can get my 100 watt half stack for the bedroom in January so I'm stoked.
#26
All you people who are saying "rocksmith can't teach you proper technique" obviously haven't played it. They have in depth videos on everything from how to hold/play your guitar, how to tune it, how to change strings, how to properly do bends, vibrato, tapping, hammer ons, pull offs, etc. Even small things like how/where to store it. There is literally over 100 videos for everything to try to make sure your technique is up to par.

I don't appreciate all you ignorant people (please don't take as insult) who have never played the new rocksmith sitting here and trash talking it. It is a wonderful tool and if you are willing to put in the time to watch all the technique videos and make sure you are applying them properly and slowly, it is just as good of a teacher (if not better) than justinguitar or youtube could ever be.
#27
I've played it.

It doesn't teach you proper technique.

It doesn't teach you how to play the guitar.

It overemphasises visual stimuli, although that's unavoidable in a video game context and not really a criticism of the game as such it is something to be wary of when playing the game. As a beginner its important to get in the habit of being led by sound, not visual cues, as soon as is possible.

It's also kind of inefficient with that weird way of throwing you into a song at full tempo, but with less notes, then adding more in as a reward for getting it right. Those bare-bones versions of the songs are often more difficult to get to grips with than the full song due the the lack of notes.

It is, however, really good fun and an excellent way to complement your learning, make practicing more fun, keep yourself motivated and also learn new songs and discover new music.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#28
Quote by steven seagull
I've played it.

It doesn't teach you proper technique.

It doesn't teach you how to play the guitar.



Are you sure you've played the new one? Because I could see that argument for the old one. But seriously, the videos and depth that come with rocksmith are things that people on youtube try to sell to make a living. I know people can just jump into songs, but that is never the proper way to learn guitar. They should watch the technique videos as the game recommends (it recommends a video for every song that has new technique) if they want to properly learn.
#29
Quote by steven seagull
I've played it.

It doesn't teach you proper technique.

It doesn't teach you how to play the guitar.

It overemphasises visual stimuli, although that's unavoidable in a video game context and not really a criticism of the game as such it is something to be wary of when playing the game. As a beginner its important to get in the habit of being led by sound, not visual cues, as soon as is possible.

It's also kind of inefficient with that weird way of throwing you into a song at full tempo, but with less notes, then adding more in as a reward for getting it right. Those bare-bones versions of the songs are often more difficult to get to grips with than the full song due the the lack of notes.

It is, however, really good fun and an excellent way to complement your learning, make practicing more fun, keep yourself motivated and also learn new songs and discover new music.


Different strokes for different folks I guess...

Granted, my experience is with the original, not 2014 (which I have waiting for me under the Christmas tree, apparently), but I think throwing me in head first actually helped me in the long run.

I'm aware that I need to start reading up on theory and techniques to become more well-rounded and avoid falling into bad habits, but Rocksmith did for me what no online lesson or teacher could do before... it forced me to branch out of my comfort zone. Starting with fewer notes got me more comfortable moving my hands up and down the neck. Adding notes helped me with dexterity and flexibility. And I can't deny it, Rocksmith has me playing better in two months than I could get myself playing in five years (albeit, without a teacher, which I simply can't pay for at the moment).
#30
Riff repeater, start slow and increase speed after you nail a section.
#31
I can see why a lot of beginners like RS and a lot of more experienced players don't, I never learned to play guitar by a game I was self taught so I know what it feels like to have people look down on you for not doing things the right way , I go by what feels right I don't care what fingers should hit what note or fret I do what feels natural, some people might say I have all the bad habits in the world but to me I play how I want how my fingers want and mind wants .

I have played RS and to me it has some "good and bad" points , the bad" if you don't play or learn the song at 100% with less notes it will add notes as you get better this will slow you down and catch you out , so you might as well learn the whole song and slow it down , solos make know sense with less notes you might as well learn the whole solo as well ,|now even if your playing is quite good on RS and you sound good you will probably sound crap if you play away from the game, people have to remember that you have the original guitar playing in the back ground over you this will make you sound better than you really are plus the fact your not going to be using your ears much in the game as its very visual . I treat it more like a backing track to play along with but with the advantage of slowing it down and learning small parts in the song, Session mode is good to improvise with and learn your scales e.c.t.- . There is also a game call Bandfuse rock legends which seems more on par with playing guitar tab might be worth a look before getting RS or maybe getting both , i think its just one tool to have but don't put all your time in to RS .
Last edited by dazzzer30 at Dec 2, 2013,
#32
As others have said, Rocksmith is just interactive tablature. Whenever I want to just learn a song, I search for a video of a guitarist playing it well and pay attention to the way he holds the guitar and the pick and stuff. Or for example which way he does a bend or which direction his vibrato goes are all things you can't pick up from just the rocksmith lessons. And also, I suggest always raising the difficulty to 100% and only lowering the speed. Since that way you get used to the correct fingering.
#33
I just rock smith 2014, its ok I have the strings set up like tabs does it help I don't know lol
Between RS and Justin's lessons it good
#34
To learn guitar, you need to also do a lot of boring practice, not just the fun easy songs - and Rocksmith makes the boring practice tons more fun. Thus you're more likely to practice more (ymmv). If it existed when I was a kid, I would've definitely chosen it over the scales and etudes and such. I'm jokingly jealous that "kids these days" have this stuff.

Also, if value for money is of any consideration to you, think about it. What do you get for the game's price? 3 sessions with a teacher? Even if you consider Rocksmith only an "interactive tabulature" or whatever (I don't), it's still really good value, especially if you do a little googling and get custom songs working.

Ofc it will not turn you into a guitar professional only by itself but that's a silly assumption to make anyways.
Last edited by Byproduct at Jan 19, 2015,