#1
When I used to play a little 6 years ago before giving it up(and it was a short time then because i made the mistake of going from Electric to Acoustic and didn't enjoy it) I learned the F Chord as a barre chord. I'd never been taught the other version using just 4 strings on the third fret, 2nd(fret) and barring the first fret on the two bottom strings. In fact, until I came across it on Youtube, I've never seen that version.

Is it frowned upon to use that version for the F Chord for some reason? Should you spend more time learning the barre chord version? It just seems impossible to learn the barre chord(and I know it isn't but it looks like a long task) when in fact I could learn the F chord as described above first and then once I have it mastered, I can learn the barre chord version.
#2
No, it's not frowned upon. I think the main reason you don't see that version of the chord that often is cause the smaller voicings are not common when just comping by yourself, atleast not in a pop/rock setting. The 4 string voicing is however very common if you look into styles such as reagge or funk.

You should learn both, cause both are very usable, and the more tools you have at your disposal the better, right? So therefor i say practice both.
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#3
They're the same chord, one version just uses less notes
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#4
Especially for fingerstyle arrangements, it's desirable to be able to play the "F" bass note with the thumb. Thus either the barre chord form or the "thumb over the neck" technique.

This particular chord causes beginners more problems than perhaps any other... It's usually the first barre they are introduced to.
The problem is compounded by poor guitar set-up. Most beginners use... Beginner's guitars. Entry-level instruments that they bought "off the rack" and took home to play.
They have little idea even that you can set the guitar up for easier playing, much less how to do it.
So, they suffer, give up, or adopt techniques that let them cope.

All easily cured by spending another 50-60 bucks for a good setup and action adjustment.
#5
If you play the smaller F shape, the bass player will have to play the F on the 2nd string 3rd fret, rather than the 4th string 1st fret, making the chord sound higher (because it is). If you play it the full way, you can achieve a lower, bassier sound.
#7
Quote by Himynameisben95
the bass player will have to play the F on the 2nd string 3rd fret

There is absolutely no reason why a bass player should match what octave you play, an F is an F.
#8
Quote by TenTonHammer
There is absolutely no reason why a bass player should match what octave you play, an F is an F.


This. I try and keep all my bass playing as low as physically possible anyway.
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#9
Get a capo.

Put it on the 1st fret.

Play an open E shaped chord.

There's your F.

Now go learn Smells Like Teen Spirit.

You're welcome.
#10
Quote by 5_Years_Dead
Get a capo.

Put it on the 1st fret.

Play an open E shaped chord.

There's your F.

Now go learn Smells Like Teen Spirit.

You're welcome.


Lol, good advice although probably not the most constructive!!

There seems to be an element missing in the advice here - how it sounds!

Learn both because an F is not an F at all

An F barre chord is dynamically different to an F played at a higher register, let's be clear they are the same chord/notes but they have a differing sound - try playing highway to hell (ac/dc) using bare chords (with a drop bass note for the riff) yes it works but sounds dynamically different to playing it Angus style with the open G chord

You dig?
#11
I'm not sure if you've noticed this, but if you hold the F barre chord shape and only hit strings 1 to 4, you are playing the exact same chord as the smaller version you speak of. In fact you could even only strum strings 1 to 3 and you would still be playing a full F major chord.

The guitar is your instrument and you can do whatever you want with it. There are no rules. There are times when you may feel the full 6 string barre chord is appropriate, and other times you may only want to play the first 4 or 3 strings. You should know how to play the chord as many ways as you can.
#12
Brian May talked about this at one point. He said that he learnt the 5 note one (the 4 finger one that you refer to - he played the added C note at the bottom) and that the big barre chord seemed to be a classical thing.

I prefer the big barre, but both are useful depending on what you're playing.
#13
You should be "able" to play both, so keep at that part of it. You want your hands strong.

In the meantime, play whatever is easier. Not a biggie, but with the smaller version, you won't hear that low F note, and that's not necessarily a bad thing. Something you don't always want that low F in there.
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