#1
Title says it all.

I will also like to know if there is any difference in tuning a guitar with Floyd rose and tuning a guitar with Tremolo.
#2
Tremolo and whammy tend to be interchangeably terms for what should properly be called a vibrato system.

Vibrato means a rapid change in pitch, while tremolo means volume. We can blame Leo Fender for the incorrect terminology.

So, tremolo, whammy and vibrato can all refer to the same thing, a type of guitar bridge that lets you alter the pitch.

A Floyd Rose is a particular design of vibrato system that is usually found on 'metal' oriented instruments. It uses a double locking, fully floating system to give a greater range of use and great tuning stability - but it makes working on the guitar and changing tuning take longer. You have to adjust the springs as well as the strings to keep it in balance. You also need to use the fine tuners located on the bridge itself once you've locked down the nut.

Some vintage style vibrato systems don't have this sort of locking/floating setup and so tuning them is hardly different to hardtail guitars. Others can be set to float, so they might need some spring adjustment too. A Floyd will always need more care and attention unless the user decides to 'block' it. That means effectively preventing it from pulling up, so it's no longer floating. It reduces the functionality, but makes tuning a bit easier.
#3
Quote by Confuse-a-Cat
Tremolo and whammy tend to be interchangeably terms for what should properly be called a vibrato system.

Vibrato means a rapid change in pitch, while tremolo means volume. We can blame Leo Fender for the incorrect terminology.

So, tremolo, whammy and vibrato can all refer to the same thing, a type of guitar bridge that lets you alter the pitch.

A Floyd Rose is a particular design of vibrato system that is usually found on 'metal' oriented instruments. It uses a double locking, fully floating system to give a greater range of use and great tuning stability - but it makes working on the guitar and changing tuning take longer. You have to adjust the springs as well as the strings to keep it in balance. You also need to use the fine tuners located on the bridge itself once you've locked down the nut.

Some vintage style vibrato systems don't have this sort of locking/floating setup and so tuning them is hardly different to hardtail guitars. Others can be set to float, so they might need some spring adjustment too. A Floyd will always need more care and attention unless the user decides to 'block' it. That means effectively preventing it from pulling up, so it's no longer floating. It reduces the functionality, but makes tuning a bit easier.


Basically I shouldnt take a Floyd for my first guitar.?

How long does the tuning process take on a floyd?

Can you mention some songs making large use of a floyd?
#4
No, I would not advise a Floyd on your 1st electric guitar.

Get a hard-tail style.
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#5
A Floyd will require a good 15 minutes to half an hour for a beginner to do a string change. They're also a pain in the ass to tune.
Q: Favourite Pink Floyd song?
A: The one where they get wicked high and play Emin and A for an hour.
#6
Nothing wrong with a FR on you first guitar, you'll get good at playing it and setting it up if you make an effort. I much prefer fine tuning over using machine heads as well, I think hardtails should have locking nuts and fine tuners, they would be more stable in tuning...that is a fact based on physics.
#7
I got a Floyd Rose as my first electric guitar (I didn't know what I was buying at the time) and I would not recommend it. In fact I wouldn't recommend a Floyd Rose guitar to anyone who wants to play more than one tuning. They're definitely great live guitars but really, really bad practicing guitars.
#8
Quote by Ayushyadav
Basically I shouldnt take a Floyd for my first guitar.?

How long does the tuning process take on a floyd?

Can you mention some songs making large use of a floyd?


Floyd's work on a system of balancing where the springs counteract the tension of the strings, thus keeping the system balanced, if the guitar has been routed out so that the floyd can be pulled back to increase pitch this process is made harder, but you have the advantage of being able to increase pitch with the floyd, which normal fender style tremolo systems can't do. Some players like Eddie Van Halen never routed their guitars so they don't have this problem, but if you want the full possibilities of a floyd it's an advantage that is well worth the string change time.

Tuning time will take less time if you have practice (which you will get over time). I'd also recommended a tremolno, so if you are changing strings due to age and not breakage you can lock the floyd in place beforehand so tuning time will be drastically reduced. Also if you have the bridge locked when a string breaks it won't throw off the balance, and you can just put the new string on and tune it and you should be good in theory.
http://www.tremol-no.com/

some players that use a Floyd heavily are Dimebag Darrell (Pantera), Tom Morello (Rage Against The Machine/Audioslave), Eddie Van Halen, Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, Kirk Hammett (Metallica), Kerry King, Jeff Hanneman (Slayer, they use kahlers that allow identical changes in pitch to a floyd, but works on a cam instead of spring tension counteraction.)

Solo at 3:36 Jeff and Kerry go nuts with their whammy bars to immitate the screams of Mengele's holocaust victims.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XNnaRHqtrDQ

The riff that starts shortly into the song is created by Tom doing pre bends with his Ibanez Edge.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kDt73Ml3Cq4

Solo at 3:40, probably Kirk's most prevalent use of the Wahmmy bar in a song.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6XyEZEXjq6U

Features Dimes famous dime screams where he hits harmonics and pulls the whammy bar back, increasing the pitch.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JTDj-I8LiXM

Features Joe doing some techniques similar to what Dime did.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uoERl34Ld00

Possibly one of the most famous uses of whammy those dive bombs in between licks, except for the end of the song which is created by manipulating the echoplex.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sI7XiJgt0vY

Solo at 2:07 this is probably the craziest you can get with a floyd and have it still be musical.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ht3XGhlfYs

Tom gets pretty crazy with it here throughout.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KyZDvZmvhik

Solo 1:10 feedback + whammy bar = guitar solo
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fI677jYfKz0

Solo 3:39 the beginning uses the whammy pedal on the one octave up setting but the end is where tom makes the cat chases the mouse around the room.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vOb3RJhlvfA

2:20 the possibilities are endless you just need some imagination
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U3kwc-bxW0g
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Stairway is required on any list of anything involving the words guitar or song, I believe Congress amended the constitution in order to put it into federal law.
#9
Personally, I think of a tremolo as another instrument unto itself. You can use it to lower notes in a certain scale, for instance like Dmin., you can lower the pitch of the open low E string down to a D, then C, B flat, A, G, F, E and down to D ( lower register). If the body is routed, you can use it raise the pitch.
If you decide to get one with a Floyd, it'll be worth it, the tremolo system is a blast. Enjoy and learn !!!!
Then in time you can use it to do warble effects, hit two harmonics at once and get some real evil sounds .... or you can just rock it slowly on chords
Last edited by AJ6stringsting at Nov 6, 2013,
#10
I wouldn't recommend it either. It's a pain to set up, certainly if you're new to the thing. Like others said before. If you're experimenting with different genres or bands or you play in multiple tunings it'll be ennoying to constantly change the tuning on the floyd. A hardtail or guitar with a normal tremolo wil be much easier.
#11
Personally I have always preferred hard tail guitars. I've had 2 guitars before with Floyds in them. If you can have multiple guitars all tuned different ways I really don't have a problem with Floyds. But if this is your only guitar and you need different tunings I'd avoid them like the plague. I'm thinking of getting one again since I have multiple guitars now.
#12
Quote by Ayushyadav
Basically I shouldnt take a Floyd for my first guitar?

Probably not, no.

How long does the tuning process take on a floyd?

I wouldn't say the tuning takes that long, with the exception of tuning new strings for the first time. Really, changing strings and re-setting the FR is what's going to be a pain. It used to take me about 2 hours to do it. However, as I got better at it, it now takes about 30 minutes to remove the old strings, put in new ones, and tune to my desired tuning. (I like D standard.)
The one thing about a Floyd is, you pick one tuning. You don't retune it. So, suppose you're tuned in E standard. You won't be retuning because you want to try out a song in Drop C. Instead, you'll have to transpose the song to E. Why? Because retuning is a giant pain in the ass and a huge no-no with a FR system. You just don't do it. The advantage is you learn to transpose songs though.

Can you mention some songs making large use of a floyd?

Anything by Eddie Van Halen or Steve Vai. Both are known for "whammy bar abuse".
#13
Quote by travislausch
A Floyd will require a good 15 minutes to half an hour for a beginner to do a string change. They're also a pain in the ass to tune.

I've had a Floyd for 20 years and I've never managed to change strings that quickly!

They're a terrible idea for a beginner, learning to play is difficult enough without having to contend with a wobbly bridge that seems to go out of tune simply by looking at it.
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#14
I have had a floyd for over a year now and I do not have to tune it for about a week at a time. Love the stability
#15
Quote by Ayushyadav
Basically I shouldnt take a Floyd for my first guitar.?

How long does the tuning process take on a floyd?

Can you mention some songs making large use of a floyd?


Changing strings is a pain plus you can have action problems. I would recommend not to have Floyd Rose for your first guitar.
Floyd Rose gives you that extreme bending sound (like a motorcycle's engine sound) you can hear it in Van Halen tracks, Steve Vai uses it constantly too.
#16
Quote by Robbgnarly
No, I would not advise a Floyd on your 1st electric guitar.

Get a hard-tail style.

do you know any models/types of stratocasters with a hard-tail?? thanks
Last edited by jvstinealeria at Aug 4, 2016,
#17
Quote by jvstinealeria
do you know any models/types of stratocasters with a hard-tail?? thanks
Fender/Squier don't offer many hardtail Strat models, but they're certainly available from other manufacturers (and the vintage-style trem can easily be decked to behave as a hardtail). Start a new thread giving your budget, genres, preferences and location (just country/region) and people will give you recommendations.
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#18
jvstinealeria

No need to necrobump a 3-year-old thread.
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