#1
Is there a simple solution for allowing my floyd rose equipped guitar to be tuned out? I want to go between a couple of different tunings in my band's set and I was just wondering if there are cheap simple ways to do this. (Eb standard, Drop Db, Drop C etc)

I've looked up Tremelno, tremsetter, and the Floyd Rose Tremolo Stopper/Stabilizer for Fender/Floyd Rose style bridges but I wasn't sure what were the pro's and con's of all of them. (And what they actually do, the videos and instructions are confusing and filled with jargon)

Anyone know?
Also, don't suggest I get a second guitar for other tunings. I have one. I want to use this one guitar in all different tunings.
#2
I actually happen to own a guitar that I installed a Tremsetter in. Contrary to what most people say about it, it actually doesn't let you change tunings freely. What it's made to do is stabilize your tremolo just enough to stop the rest of your strings from going out of time when you bend a note. For what you want, it probably isn't worth it.

As for the Tremol-no, almost very artist I know of who uses any floating tremolo system has one of these. It's great for what you're talking about, but there's two problems with this system: 1) while it lets you change tunings freely, it limits the performance ability of your tremolo while it's in action, and 2) to actually set it, you've got to keep your backplate off (which might not be an issue for you, but it's an old pet peeve of mine), as well as having to reach into the back of your guitar to change the setting for it (as it has three) which in live situations is a pain in the ass.

To do what you want and still keep the full range of a floating tremolo, there isn't a perfect solution yet. You can either change tunings as much as you want, but compromise your tremolo's range; or you can get the Tremsetter (which I have found you can tune to drop D with if so desired) and buy a Digitech Whammy DT to handle the rest of the down-tuning, but that will cost far more money. It all really depends on what's more important to you.
#3
A Tremel-no will work for drop tunings but only in hardtail mode and dive only mode. For free floating dive bombs and pulls up then there's probably no device which will keep a floyd in tune when changing tunings.
Last edited by kingking22 at Nov 3, 2013,
#6
Quote by Sinfinity000
I actually happen to own a guitar that I installed a Tremsetter in. Contrary to what most people say about it, it actually doesn't let you change tunings freely. What it's made to do is stabilize your tremolo just enough to stop the rest of your strings from going out of time when you bend a note. For what you want, it probably isn't worth it.

As for the Tremol-no, almost very artist I know of who uses any floating tremolo system has one of these. It's great for what you're talking about, but there's two problems with this system: 1) while it lets you change tunings freely, it limits the performance ability of your tremolo while it's in action, and 2) to actually set it, you've got to keep your backplate off (which might not be an issue for you, but it's an old pet peeve of mine), as well as having to reach into the back of your guitar to change the setting for it (as it has three) which in live situations is a pain in the ass.

To do what you want and still keep the full range of a floating tremolo, there isn't a perfect solution yet. You can either change tunings as much as you want, but compromise your tremolo's range; or you can get the Tremsetter (which I have found you can tune to drop D with if so desired) and buy a Digitech Whammy DT to handle the rest of the down-tuning, but that will cost far more money. It all really depends on what's more important to you.


Can you reiterate on the tremelno?
How does it limit the performance ability?
#7
I don't think any of the gear out there will handle going from E standard to C, they just do not have the strength to deal with the massive change in tension. Not to mention that you're going to deal with very loose or tight strings at either end of the spectrum. Solution? Buy another guitar.
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#8
^
That huge span of different tunings will cause massive problems with both string tension and intonation, so you will just sound crap imho...not to mention how the neck on the guitar will react never having constant tension.
If you really need all those different tunings on a single guitar, you might want to look into a Line6 James Tyler Variax so you can switch between different tunings on the fly.
I know you don't want to get another guitar, but you are just asking too much from that one guitar.
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