#1
He's a pretty nice guy. So he likes a lot of embellishments and frills, so what.
Love him. He's good.
#3
know who else liked a lot of embellishments and frills?

hitler.
modes are a social construct
#4
That statement up there in the OP seems either sardonic or lax, and thus makes me think it's a trap, but here goes nothing anyway:

Any sort of disdain or hate toward Chopin that I witness in conversation tends to come from: the fact that he wrote in a Romantic idiom and thus tends to be emotionally accessible and (in some views) vapid whilst not employing consistently rigorous techniques of motivic variation and development (instead preferring thematic procedures); the fact that he wrote primarily for piano and thus didn't make anything nice for Charlie's favorite viola da gamba; the fact that the third movement his Piano Sonata No. 2 is more recognized than any of Luciano Berio's Sequenzas; the fact that nobody understands what tempo rubato is, ever, and thus the relevance of temporal manipulation of notes to Chopin's music is wishful fappery. Pretty much that stuff, in my experience. I happen to like his pieces, but certainly not to the exclusion of anything else.
You might could use some double modals.
#6
No one hates Chopin. Well, not no one. But very few people. Most pianists revere him as do most other musicians and audiences. Mostly the people that don't like him are composers because his music is pretty fluffy without much substance. Even that thought is somewhat from ignorance though, because he was often doing more than a lot of people realize when it comes to the technical aspect of composing.

That said, I despise his music because it sounds bad and is boring to me.
#8
At my request, my entire bowling team nicknamed me Chopin (though, we pronounce it how it's spelt) because I can't clean a frame for the fucking life of me.

Seeing as I requested the name, it's probably easy to tell that I rather like Chopin. He's not my favorite, but he's not bad either.
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#9
I do enjoy Chopin. Prelude in a minor is really awesome. In general, he's not one of my favorites, just because I don't listen to a ton of piano-centric music, but when I do, Chopin is high on my list of people to listen to.
Strauss!
"I am hitting my head against the walls, but the walls are giving way." - Gustav Mahler.

Quote by AeolianWolf
absolutely what will said

Yay, my first compliment!
#11
Chopin doesn't handle large forms very well, his music lacks motivic development, and he doesn't really write outside of the piano idiom. He is more of a composer for the piano than anything else. He takes advantage of the instrument unlike many composers out there and his music is very accessible. I'd say Bach, Beethoven, Brahms were much more inventive and flexible composers, but hey, Chopin does his own thing and it's a bit restrictive, but he does it very well. If you want to talk fluff, there are many other composers out there like Liszt or Alkan that have put out much more fluff than him.
#12
Quote by sweetdude3000
If you want to talk fluff, there are many other composers out there like Liszt or Alkan that have put out much more fluff than him.

And people don't consider them part of the "greats" either. Fluff is called "fluff" for a reason.
#13
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
And people don't consider them part of the "greats" either. Fluff is called "fluff" for a reason.

Umm... Maybe not Alkan, but Liszt is DEFINITELY considered one of the greats.
#15
Quote by Nietsche
If Liszt isn't a 'great' composer then I don't know what is.

Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Umm... Maybe not Alkan, but Liszt is DEFINITELY considered one of the greats.

Calm down, guys. I was 100% joking.
#16
There isn't anything about that post or about your previous posting history that would indicate as such so how we were supposed to get that is anyone's guess.
.
#17
Quote by Nietsche
There isn't anything about that post or about your previous posting history that would indicate as such so how we were supposed to get that is anyone's guess.

I was assuming that people would know Liszt is one of the greats...
#18
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
No one hates Chopin. Well, not no one. But very few people. Most pianists revere him as do most other musicians and audiences. Mostly the people that don't like him are composers because his music is pretty fluffy without much substance. Even that thought is somewhat from ignorance though, because he was often doing more than a lot of people realize when it comes to the technical aspect of composing.

That said, I despise his music because it sounds bad and is boring to me.



Yeah, I'm one of those people who don't like chopin. I think his sonatas are interesting, but they don't compare at all to beethoven. That being said, I have performed most of his work... most audiences still love it =\
#19
Quote by griffRG7321
A lot of people jumped the bandwagon when Xiaxi said he's shit.



Yep
#20
Personally, I quite like Chopin. I don't think he's a genius on the level of Beethoven, Schubert, Mozart, Bach et al, but it's unpretentious and easy to listen to. I'd never go to concert that was all Chopin, and I never listen to it at home either, but it's always nice to hear it as part of a recital programme.

To all criticising him for lack of motivic development, formal weakness etc., I think that's a little unfair for a couple of reasons. A major part of Nationalist music in the 19th Century was to move away from what was seen by some as an excessively pedantic, academic and heavy approach of the Germanic school of composition. Essentially, just to write a bloody good tune.

Although Chopin hated the label of being a "Romantic", he certainly was a product of his time: you only have to look at the crowd he hung around with, most notably George Sand. I have some issues with the popular definition of Romanticism in music, but I think one thing that everyone can agree on is more flexibility and experimentation (or rather a different kind of both, it's ridiculous to assert that Classical composers were rigid formally) in form from how it was treated by the Classical greats, is a key aspect of Romanticism. (Sorry for rather ungainly sentence). Just in the same way that early classical composers are not (and shouldn't be) written off because they pail in comparison to late Mozart, I think that Chopin should be given credit where it is due. He took risks, and they didn't all work out, but he still achieved something new.

On top of that, I don't find all of his music badly judged in terms of form, the 2nd and 3rd Sonatas are really cool. The Ballades are enjoyable to listen to, many of the Preludes are beautiful. Some of the miniatures do annoy me, but they have a time and place, as all Salon music does.