#1
Hey guys, I'm just a newbie starting back to playing guitar. I had played acoustic for 6 months like 5 years ago but I had sportive activities to do and couldnt find time for guitar. Now I'm back to it since I got injured and wont be doing any sports. I'm really enjoying tbh ^^

Well back to topic, my fingers are currently weak and I tho it could be good to learn some theory and fingering while getting some calluses and strength. So pentatonics seemed a good spot to learn and gain finger agility..

However I got few questions. First of all I did understand that there is 5 pentatonic shapes that I must know if I want to play decently. And they are must for improvision.

The part I didnt understand is how you move them around fretboard. For example you can play Shape one starting at open E string, E string 3rd fret... and going on. Can I just move that shape "x" fret down the neck and play it the same way? or does the roots have to be A-B-C-D-E-F-G?
#2
you can play any shape starting on any position on the fretboard, moving the shape around will change the key you're playing in.

There are 12 possible roots ( A - A#/Bb- B - C - C#/Db - D - D#/Eb - E - F - F#/Gb - G - G#/Ab )
Last edited by KorYi at Nov 3, 2013,
#3
Well, starting at the beginning, you don't need all five pentatonic scales to be any good. I'd recommend learning the first (major) and fifth (relative minor) at first. The "minor" pentatonic scale that everyone learns first is the relative minor scale of its major. Say you're playing in C, the five notes (pent) of the pentatonic scale are C D E G A. Every penatonic scale in C will use these notes. The name of the scale (and the shape) depends on the note you start with. If you start it on A, you're using the minor pentatonic. C major would start on the eighth fret of the E string, A the fifth. Learn these first two patterns first and you'll be along the path to improvising.
#4
i wouldn't say you have to know them. a lot of players get by with just one position.

each of the five shapes is different. you need to learn how they match up (each shape sort of overlaps with the shape next to it, if you look at them all laid out). You can't take the same shape and move it and expect it to be in the same key- unless you move it up or down 12 frets (a whole octave).

If you're playing in E minor pentatonic position 1, for example, and move that shape up 3 frets, you're now playing in G minor pentatonic. if you want to move up 3 frets and stay in E minor pentatonic, you need to use position 2.
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#5
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Hey guys, I'm just a newbie starting back to playing guitar. I had played acoustic for 6 months like 5 years ago but I had sportive activities to do and couldnt find time for guitar. Now I'm back to it since I got injured and wont be doing any sports. I'm really enjoying tbh ^^

Well back to topic, my fingers are currently weak and I tho it could be good to learn some theory and fingering while getting some calluses and strength. So pentatonics seemed a good spot to learn and gain finger agility..

However I got few questions. First of all I did understand that there is 5 pentatonic shapes that I must know if I want to play decently. And they are must for improvision.

The part I didnt understand is how you move them around fretboard. For example you can play Shape one starting at open E string, E string 3rd fret... and going on. Can I just move that shape "x" fret down the neck and play it the same way? or does the roots have to be A-B-C-D-E-F-G?


For any given key there is one pentatonic 'shape' and it covers the whole fretboard. I is found where ever you find the notes in it, so in the key of A that would be the notes A, C, D, E, G. How you choose to carve that up to use in your playing is up to you.

That will change depending on the key you're in. So in E the minor pentatonic is E, G, A, B, D; in G it's G, Bb, C, D, F. And so on. That's really the important part of this: the shapes across the fretboard aren't the scale, they result from the scale.

Taking the shapes though, since they are very useful, if we take this A shape


e|-5-8-
b|-5-8-
g|-5-7-
d|-5-7-
a|-5-7-
e|-5-8-


And move it down two frets so that all the places in the shape that were on A are now on G:


e|-3-6-
b|-3-6-
g|-3-5-
d|-3-5-
a|-3-5-
e|-3-6-


That's now the G minor pentatonic. But the important thing, again, is that it's because the notes have changed, not because the shape has moved. The shape has moved because the notes have changed and not the other way around.
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