#1
So, I've been looking at this pedal Ive found around the internet...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=96vOzlYZnUk

... And I think it looks really cool. Okay, admittedly, this guy used it like a mental case. And at 2.00 it does sound like he's attacking a dolphin. But I think its capabilities are dead cool.

But apparently its about $150 and you can't get it in my country.

BUT I've seen a lot of places that people are saying this about $40 worth of parts, and would be really easy to DIY.

Bearing in mind, I'm a COMPLETE rookie - never touched a circuit in my life before, but am very, very interested to get started - is there anyway I'd be able to build this, and how would I go about it?

Cheers!
#2
The TSA (lol) is just a looper. Four jacks, a switch, and a pot (and a resistor and LED if you wanna get fancy). That's it. Even a complete novice should have no trouble building one.

That high price point looks like just another example of gear-savvy electronics hobbyists taking advantage of non-electronics-savvy people. If I knew nothing of electronics and I bought one of those for $150 and opened it up to see 4 jacks and a switch, I'd be really pissed.

After chasing a bunch of dead links, I found a schematic (why reinvent the wheel?), which I am re-drawing to be easier to read. I'll have it posted in a bit.

EDIT: Here ya go. Told you it was simple. All it does is use a pot to provide variable feedback from the output/return jacks to the input/send jacks. What the guy is doing in the video is using this and a distortion pedal to provide self-oscillation of the distortion pedal due to the TSA's feedback loop.
Last edited by Invader Jim at Nov 4, 2013,
#3
Quote by Invader Jim
The TSA (lol) is just a looper. Four jacks, a switch, and a pot (and a resistor and LED if you wanna get fancy). That's it. Even a complete novice should have no trouble building one.

That high price point looks like just another example of gear-savvy electronics hobbyists taking advantage of non-electronics-savvy people. If I knew nothing of electronics and I bought one of those for $150 and opened it up to see 4 jacks and a switch, I'd be really pissed.

After chasing a bunch of dead links, I found a schematic (why reinvent the wheel?), which I am re-drawing to be easier to read. I'll have it posted in a bit.

EDIT: Here ya go. Told you it was simple. All it does is use a pot to provide variable feedback from the output/return jacks to the input/send jacks. What the guy is doing in the video is using this and a distortion pedal to provide self-oscillation of the distortion pedal due to the TSA's feedback loop.


Awh, cheers dude, that looks so great! I almost understand it, I'll show it to a buddy who should be able to help, haha. Where could I buy these bits?

And is one of these bits the stomp-button?
Last edited by Paddynbob at Nov 5, 2013,
#4
Smallbearelec.com has everything you need. The rectangle with six ovals is the bottom view of a dpdt stomp switch. The four circular things are the jacks. There are three mono and one stereo. The circle labled 250k is a 250k linear pot. The resistor and LED are optional. If you don't want the led, omit the battery and 1k resistor and use a SPST stomp instead. It'll be cheaper and marginally easier to wire but you would lose the on/bypass indication.

If you have other questions just ask.
Last edited by Invader Jim at Nov 5, 2013,
#5
Quote by Invader Jim
Smallbearelec.com has everything you need.

If you have other questions just ask.


Can you order from there in the UK?
#8
Quote by Invader Jim
For future reference, smallbear ships worldwide. Just in case you find a rare old part there you can't live without.


I'm ordering parts through my school; what would be the proper name for the foot switch part? :L
#10
Quote by Invader Jim
It's a DPDT (double-pole double-throw) stomp switch (it may be labeled as a push-button switch instead). Be sure to get one that is good and rugged.


Do I have to get a metal case to earth it, I presume? I won't be able to run off my DC Brick, will I?
Thats the stuff ordered
#11
Metal cases are always better because they help shield the stuff from noise. You can run it from a pedalboard power supply, or you can just leave it unplugged. The only reason you even need to power it is because of the LED. Without the LED, this box is totally passive and requires no power. It will work whether or not it is plugged in, regardless.
#12
Quote by Invader Jim
Metal cases are always better because they help shield the stuff from noise. You can run it from a pedalboard power supply, or you can just leave it unplugged. The only reason you even need to power it is because of the LED. Without the LED, this box is totally passive and requires no power. It will work whether or not it is plugged in, regardless.


Really? So even if I left a battery out of it? :S