#1
I'm in a standard rock band, we have a few gigs lined up but no one in the band drives a car which is annoying.

I can always attend gig rehearsals because even if I don't have an amp I can just plug my boss DS pedal into the main PA but someone told me I can't do this for a gig for some reason.

Does anyone here know why I can't do this or if there are other options?
I've heard about these POD amps which look very small and I wouldn't mind carrying one of those around.
#2
What you really need is a new amp!

Well you could continue doing that but people will most likely yell at you because your tone sucks and they would have a fair amount of good reasons to do that, including the fact that your tone will probably suck.

If you want to do that get an equalizer pedal at least so you can dial in a decent tone.

PODs are small digital preamplifiers made by Line 6.
They are convenient, small, relatively cheap, and they don't even sound bad.

Wither an EQ, a POD or a new super cool 1x12 combo would do.
Name's Luca.

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Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
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#3
What you need is a new car.

Or have a look at what Spambot_2 suggested. He is, after all, better than Spambot_1.
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#4
If you plug your Boss distortion pedal straight to the PA, it will sound terrible. I mean, guitar sound needs guitar speakers or cabinet emulation. And Boss DS1 isn't the best sounding distortion pedal I have heard. Plugging your DS1 straight to the PA will sound the same as if you plug your headphones straight to the pedal. You can try it and you'll notice that it really sounds terrible. Guitar sound just needs some color. And that's what guitar amp and guitar speakers do.

Yeah, I would at least buy a multi FX like Pod if you can't carry your amp with you. Or then just buy a car.
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#5
Get a POD HD300...going DI without any sort of amp/speaker emulation is going to sound like straight up turd.
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#6
thanks for the replies, I actually already have a boss ME 70 effects pedal aswell which does have an eq on it, so I'm guessing I could use that possibly.
#7
Well, it's not about an EQ, really. It's about amp modeling. Does the ME-70 do that?

Let's say, hypothetically, that you were going to buy an amp, how much would you be willing to pony up, where are you located, what styles of music do you play and what's your current gear?
Gibson Les Paul Studio
Highway One Telecaster
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Laney GH50L
Vox AC30 C2
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#8
I have never put much thought into my guitar amp before as I've never been in a band before and never done gigs before, playing guitar has only been a hobby before now so I don't even really know what amp modelling is.

But the Boss ME 70 is a huge multi fx pedal with a few amp settings on the side that I can see, like lead stack, stack, combo, clean.

Buying an amp is not the concern, it's transporting the amp to places because I don't drive.

We play standard rock music and I've got a LTD deluxe guitar. In the past for gigs I've just used the headlining bands amp, which is probably what will happen for this next gig I've just found out.
#9
The biggest problem with going without an amp and using something like a Pod is that you are relying totally on the foldback monitors to hear yourself. That presents three problems.
1. It is best if only the vocals go through the foldback, especially if you are all sharing a single mono foldback mix which is pretty common.
2. You have to rely on the sound guy turning you up enough in the foldback. He can't hear what you hear so he is likely to **** it up.
3. If you use feedback, trying to get that through the wedges often ends in tears because you are sharing that with the vocals. Expect the singer to hit you.

The way I have always approached it is that the band should be able to hear each other clearly without the PA apart from the vocals. That puts the foldback under your control, not the sound guy's. All you have to tell the sound guy is whether or not the vocals can be heard on stage. Simple, easy and almost foolproof.
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Cathbard Amplification
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#10
Quote by Cathbard
The biggest problem with going without an amp and using something like a Pod is that you are relying totally on the foldback monitors to hear yourself. That presents three problems.
1. It is best if only the vocals go through the foldback, especially if you are all sharing a single mono foldback mix which is pretty common.
2. You have to rely on the sound guy turning you up enough in the foldback. He can't hear what you hear so he is likely to **** it up.
3. If you use feedback, trying to get that through the wedges often ends in tears because you are sharing that with the vocals. Expect the singer to hit you.

The way I have always approached it is that the band should be able to hear each other clearly without the PA apart from the vocals. That puts the foldback under your control, not the sound guy's. All you have to tell the sound guy is whether or not the vocals can be heard on stage. Simple, easy and almost foolproof.


That's how it's been done since the '50's.

These days, however, there are a LOT of us running into a Pod and then directly into the mixer from there, and we survive on the wedges or on IEMs (In Ear Monitors). The better sound systems can output to several separate monitor banks, so you can have a monitor for yours (and, say, the bass player or the other guitarist) with most of the vocals NOT in your mix. Meanwhile, the vocalists can get their monitors set up to feature themselves.

I'd suggest avoiding the HD300. I have a Pod HD (fits into a gig bag pocket) and an HD 500. The HD (the bean) has pretty much everything the 500 does except for foot switching. You may find that the FBV Express II foot pedal will do virtually everything you need (and it's small). I've certainly used it live. You just have to change channels between songs occasionally. I've put the entire set list into Pod memory and just made sure I'm on the correct channel when we begin a song. That gives me at least four changes of bank during the song. The FBV Express also has a wah/volume pedal, a tuner display/mute and a tap tempo setup onboard.
#11
If you are using your own sound guy and a known PA then you could get away with it pretty easily. In the world of playing bars and clubs you don't know wtf you are walking into so it's best to cover your arse in my experience. The less you have to rely on the sound guy to hear yourself the better.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#12
Quote by paulpablo
I have never put much thought into my guitar amp before as I've never been in a band before and never done gigs before, playing guitar has only been a hobby before now so I don't even really know what amp modelling is.

But the Boss ME 70 is a huge multi fx pedal with a few amp settings on the side that I can see, like lead stack, stack, combo, clean.

Buying an amp is not the concern, it's transporting the amp to places because I don't drive.

We play standard rock music and I've got a LTD deluxe guitar. In the past for gigs I've just used the headlining bands amp, which is probably what will happen for this next gig I've just found out.


Well, sometimes there's a backline at the venue. But honestly, if you're serious about gigging I would look into getting your own amp. It's really just the "professional" thing to do.

Also, look into bumming a ride from someone if you really need too. Put the pride aside and buy the driver a some pizza and beer or something. I don't know what the situation is (age, urban area that doesn't require a car, etc) but maybe think about public transport with a hand cart, as well.
Gibson Les Paul Studio
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#13
Quote by Cathbard
Expect the singer to hit you.

Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#14
Putting a distortion pedal straight to a PA system without any cabinet simulation results in what is essentially a white noise with notes mixed in. The raw guitar signal distorted is so harsh, piercing and noisy that even worst Black Metal fanatic would run away screaming and ears bleeding.

Guitar is a midrange instrument and the amp and especially the speaker cuts away the not essential parts (high treble, low bass). And since you are CREATING sound the speaker is also very colored with spikes and holes all over the place, unlike hifi and PA systems. The latters are used to reproduce already created sound, meaning they are (relatively) flat so that it would avoid adding a coloration of its own and they extend to both directions to cover all instruments.

So, get a giggable amp. It doesnt necessarily have to be huge. A 40w+ (more for solid state) 1x12" tube combo or small half stack is enough. If the the gig is miced through a PA system the wattage is even less of an issue since you dont need to push the amp so hard, the PA system is there to fill the place with sound.

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Last edited by MaaZeus at Nov 5, 2013,
#15
If you want to play a crap gig, yes you can nobody will stop you.

If you want to be professional about it. No, get an amp.

Thats about as simple as I can make it haha.
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#16
Go and throw your money on a MesaBoogie Mark III.
And here's why...
You will find that it AMPLIFIES.
That's what an amp is supposed to do.
It doesn't add "color" to your rig... it just amp's.
And,
Not only does it amp your sound, it cuts through the air... for some reason.
I once got in a pissin contest with a fender twin guy...
Fender twins will bite your ears off with their highs but my Booger chopped air with dignity.
Ask any Boogie owner.
#17
Quote by ELUSIVESOUNDD
Go and throw your money on a MesaBoogie Mark III.
And here's why...
You will find that it AMPLIFIES.
That's what an amp is supposed to do.
It doesn't add "color" to your rig... it just amp's.
And,
Not only does it amp your sound, it cuts through the air... for some reason.
I once got in a pissin contest with a fender twin guy...
Fender twins will bite your ears off with their highs but my Booger chopped air with dignity.
Ask any Boogie owner.

Hey what now? A Mark 3 doesn't colour your sound? Man, you really must introduce me to your drug dealer.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#18
learn to drive or find someone that can get the band around. I mean really that seems like a big issue to me in terms of being able to get to gigs etc. can't imagine telling a bar owner "oops sorry i'm late cuz the bus was off schedule". then get an amp. having a POD as a backup is a good idea and in some cases like a very small venue it can work great. presenting yourself in a reasonably professional matter will count for a lot if you want to keep gigging. not having proper gear and transportation will bite you in the ass.