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#1
I'm a beginner to intermediate player. I know the Chromatic scale fairly well. I also am learning the triad forms across the neck.

I notice when I write songs I simply impose the triads over the corresponding chromatic notes. I really don't need to memorize chord progressions.

What do you think about this idea?
#2
Quote by antics32
I'm a beginner to intermediate player. I know the Chromatic scale fairly well. I also am learning the triad forms across the neck.

I notice when I write songs I simply impose the triads over the corresponding chromatic notes. I really don't need to memorize chord progressions.

What do you think about this idea?

So you know half the alphabet

Congratulations, you've just passed kindergarten
Quote by Night
wtf is a selfie? is that like, touching yourself or something?
#3
Quote by Wiegenlied
So you know half the alphabet

Congratulations, you've just passed kindergarten


So the alphabet you use only utilizes 14 letters then?
#4
How can you know the chromatic scale only fairly well?

e---/12---/0

There you go.


so troll
Last edited by Baby Joel at Nov 4, 2013,
#5
I don't get what you mean? Can you please explain? I do know the natural minor triads and the natural major triads. I'm learning the seventh forms. I can derive the modes from the major scale.

I'm new to guitar but I did play clarinet and saxophone for about ten years.
#6
Quote by Wiegenlied
So you know half the alphabet

Congratulations, you've just passed kindergarten

We have sharps and flats in our letters?

Sinc#eb whe#n?!
We're all alright!
#7
They're just giving you shit for saying you know the chromatic scale fairly well. If your idea works for you then stick with it, I prefer knowing my progressions I'm soloing over. Not all chord progressions follow diatonic notes as I'm sure you know and it seems that's what your post is saying.
#8
I think you mean the diatonic scales. The chromatic scale is the set of all notes (A, A#, B, C, C#, etc.).


Edit: Nope, I think I misunderstood you. The answer to that question is: yes. However, I think it would be a lot more time-efficient to memorise the chords, and find the corresponding notes on your fretboard. By learning the chromatic scale I assume you learned the notes on the fretboard?
Last edited by frankv at Nov 4, 2013,
#9
Quote by frankv
I think you mean the diatonic scales. The chromatic scale is the set of all notes (A, A#, B, C, C#, etc.).

nah man, he's played sax and clarinet for 10 years, the guys a pro
pinga
#10
I don't have any idea what TS is talking about.
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If women can be annoyed there arent any women incongress I should be allowed to be pissed off there are no members of pink floyd or the beatles in congress.
#11
Quote by That Old Geezer
They're just giving you shit for saying you know the chromatic scale fairly well. If your idea works for you then stick with it, I prefer knowing my progressions I'm soloing over. Not all chord progressions follow diatonic notes as I'm sure you know and it seems that's what your post is saying.


Ah, that makes sense thanks for the response. Clarinet and saxophone also have sharps and flats by the way.
#12
Quote by antics32
Ah, that makes sense thanks for the response. Clarinet and saxophone also have sharps and flats by the way.


What kind of Sax you play? Alto?
#14
You'll get better replies in the Musician Talk forum.

And by better I mean more helpful and more entertaining.
Quote by Trowzaa
I wish I was American.

~ A Rolling Potato Gathers No Moss ~
#15
Actually, would it be helpful if I scanned and posted the Chromatic? Also, the triad forms? Would anyone benefit from that?

I played from seven to twenty-two the clarinet in elementary, junior high, high school and college.
#16
Quote by antics32
Actually, would it be helpful if I scanned and posted the Chromatic? Also, the triad forms? Would anyone benefit from that?

I played from seven to twenty-two the clarinet in elementary, junior high, high school and college.

I don't understand then how you only "fairly" know the chromatic scale having played for so long. That's the first scale that is taught besides the C or Bb major scales in beginning band.
pinga
#17
Quote by Cb4rabid
I don't understand then how you only "fairly" know the chromatic scale having played for so long. That's the first scale that is taught besides the C or Bb major scales in beginning band.


I mean on the guitar neck. The Clarinet is all Chromatic. In fact, for the Clarinet there is almost no need to learn scales. Almost no need, almost. You can to improve pitch for sure but otherwise reading clarinet music is easy.

Would it be helpful if I posted a fretboard layout and corresponding triads? I think people would learn from it.
#19
I don't see how smuggling Chinese mob members into the country and then forcing them onto your internet browser is a good idea.
...Stapling helium to penguins since 1949.
#20
Quote by Todd Hart
I don't see how smuggling Chinese mob members into the country and then forcing them onto your internet browser is a good idea.

You don't?

The UK school system is failing us all.
Quote by Trowzaa
I wish I was American.

~ A Rolling Potato Gathers No Moss ~
#21
Quote by eGraham
You don't?

The UK school system is failing us all.


Well I did miss a few weeks in year 6, was it covered then?
...Stapling helium to penguins since 1949.
#22
Oh, sorry about that. In the states we have music programs in public education. I'm not sure if England does.

Anyway here is what I am talking about. Here is the F Major scale, F Major Triad Forms, F Minor Triad Forms. I haven't derived the Seventh for F but it's the same pattern.

[forbidden link]


[forbidden link]

[forbidden link]

Now with the Chromatic you can derive all the modes by simply shifting them across the neck.

Does this help?
#23
Oh Ultimate Guitar won't link to Photobucket...any suggestions?

F Major

F Major Triad

F Minor Triad

If the links don't work this time all you have to do is get the Guitar Grimoire and box in the lead scale for the Major.
Last edited by antics32 at Nov 4, 2013,
#24
You can't post links to external websites until you are a more regular poster.
Quote by Trowzaa
I wish I was American.

~ A Rolling Potato Gathers No Moss ~
#25
Quote by eGraham
You can't post links to external websites until you are a more regular poster.


Ahhhhh...thank you for that...sorry about that...I'll post more...
#26
Quote by TunerAddict
I don't have any idea what TS is talking about.


This.
Sail upon the open skies
#27
Moved to MT
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#28
Quote by Mathedes
We have sharps and flats in our letters?

Sinc#eb whe#n?!




Wonder if I have enough room to sig all this
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#29
Quote by antics32
I'm a beginner to intermediate player. I know the Chromatic scale fairly well. I also am learning the triad forms across the neck.

I notice when I write songs I simply impose the triads over the corresponding chromatic notes. I really don't need to memorize chord progressions.

Ok, so if your progression is the following:
F#min - Bmin - C#min
then what would you play over that? It's a repeated progression, btw.
#31
Quote by macashmack
Arpeggios.

All due respect, but is your username "antics32"? No? Then, kindly let TS answer.
#32
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
All due respect, but is your username "antics32"? No? Then, kindly let TS answer.

My bad. My answer sucked anyway.
Last edited by macashmack at Nov 4, 2013,
#33
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
Ok, so if your progression is the following:
F#min - Bmin - C#min
then what would you play over that? It's a repeated progression, btw.


Sorry, for not getting back to you sooner but I would play it over the Aelion which is the natural minor...just shift the major and you have the same patterns.

Can someone go deeper into arpeggios? I can't find a good book on it yet.
#34
Oh, and you can have notes outside the Chromatic and still sound melodic. I do that quite frequently when I want a bluesy sound.
#35
Quote by antics32
Sorry, for not getting back to you sooner but I would play it over the Aelion which is the natural minor...just shift the major and you have the same patterns.

Yes.

A few minor semantics though:
1) Because the progression is not a modal progression, it's more correct to say you would use the natural minor scale.
2) I wouldn't focus on patterns as much as focusing on the notes and intervals.
3) Of course the relative majors and minors will always have the same notes, but the scale (even if it's a "shifted major") is always going to be in a minor key in the progression I laid out above.
4) Keep in mind that you're not limited to just the natural minor scale. Accidentals and chromatics are useful in creating tension.

Can someone go deeper into arpeggios? I can't find a good book on it yet.

An arpeggio is simply a chord where one note after another (one note at a time) is played.

For example:
 
e-----------1-
B---------1---
G-------2-----
D-----3-------
A---3---------
E-1-----------

The above is one pattern for an Fmajor arpeggio. If you play it as described rather than strumming the chord, then you've just played an arpeggio.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Nov 23, 2013,
#36
Quote by antics32
Oh, and you can have notes outside the Chromatic and still sound melodic. I do that quite frequently when I want a bluesy sound.


Woah. This just got metaphysical.
What does that even mean?
"I agree with Matthew about everything" - Everyone
#38
Quote by antics32
Actually, would it be helpful if I scanned and posted the Chromatic? Also, the triad forms? Would anyone benefit from that?
I sure someone might possibly be helped, but most of us already know them, and then some.

As far as most of this goes, I think beginners would be best served by being guided to any one of a number of teaching sites, such as "Justin Guitar", or to any one of a number of fine "method books", such as those written by Mel Bay, and others.

Forums usually deal with sorting out details, and or specific questions, not "reinventing the wheel".

I've played guitar, (albeit poorly), for almost 4 decades. But yet, I don't have the hubris to think I could post a "how to play saxophone" blog.

Mitigating that somewhat, I'm not really anywhere a multi-instrumentalist.

With all that said, there are many eccentricities involved with learning to play guitar, that aren't shared with most orchestral instruments. Tabs, changing key with a capo, scale "shapes", the "CAGED" system, to name the most prominent. Arguably, these are shortcuts, or self involved aggrandizing, while at the same time separating the study of guitar from more formal studies. But, in the end a guitar is pretty much a "folk instrument", and learning to play one, from long lists of clinical tables, would likely alienate many more would be guitarists, than it would embrace.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Nov 23, 2013,
#39
Quote by Mathedes
We have sharps and flats in our letters?

Sinc#eb whe#n?!


I don't know, I speak sharply or flatly as necessary, when being sarcastic.
#40
Quote by cdgraves
I don't know, I speak sharply or flatly as necessary, when being sarcastic.
Certain psychotropic medications make people speak flatly only, notably Haloperidol, and Thorazine....
Last edited by Captaincranky at Nov 23, 2013,
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