#1
Okay so what's, the point of playing along to recordings? Would it be a good idea when you're just getting into learning lead? Also what are, the benefits in doing this I've heard a lot of people tell me to play a long to recordings, but they wouldn't give me a specific reason why it would benefit me. Also I noticed in watching a lot of cover songs on, Youtube that the recording of the original song would be playing in the back ground. While the person, that's covering the song is playing it note for note I just don't get it. Would anyone here care to, explain to me the benefits, and or reasons they play along to recordings?
#2
Because it's fun.

You're also forced to stay in time if you weren't using a metronome.

You'll also develop your ear. Especially if you improvise a bit over it.
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#3
I can already, figure songs out by ear, but the thing is I never really covered a song note for note. I could understand the reasons, why a person would play along to the original records, but only for phrasing purposes. Also I have, another questions how would I be able to play along to the rhythm guitar, and transcribe chords if I can barely hear them being played in some songs. I really want to learn how to transcribe chords, any advice?
#4
Transcribing songs is one of the best methods to train your ear dude! Most of the best jazz players from the last century learned their stuff from listening to real masters doing their thing. You might not understand why, but everytime you try to analyze and play what you are hearing, your inner ear develops slowly as well as your brain. Sometimes it's better to transcribe musical passages by ear exactly as they are being played before trying to come up with your own stuff!

To find out what chords are being played, you should start hearing really basic songs first. Try to find acoustic recordings that have fewer instruments in the mix to avoid getting distracted, and open your ears to what bass notes are being played. After you have the bass note right, you can start guessing whether it's a major, minor, dominant or whatever chord, and you will slowly start recognizing the color of each chord without having to guess in the future. I'm no teacher and no guitar god, but I hope I helped you somehow.
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#5
Quote by Black_devils
(...) While the person, that's covering the song is playing it note for note I just don't get it. Would anyone here care to, explain to me the benefits, and or reasons they play along to recordings?


Backing track. Youtubers want to record a cover using one instrument and share it with other people, a guitar solo (or single track) doesn't sound that nice without the context of chords and rhythm. Non-musicians might not even recognize it. People can't or won't make their own backing track of the song (it's much more work), so the simple way is to use the original recording and play over it.

As for transcribing chords, the way I did it (and often still do) is to play along with the song, adding more notes, until everything is in harmony and sounds correct, in tune. If you need to find the chords as accurate as possible, it's best to slow down the song and/or repeat the part you're transcribing. This is easy with today's software technology. You get better at this the more you do it. And when you have deciphered a great song and know how it's built, you learn what works and essentially have what you need to start composing your own. The benefits of transcribing are great.
#6
I find this to be the best form of practice. It helps in pretty much every aspect, particularly your sense of timing. Records are never off. It also helps with ear training, memory, and building up your repertoire of material. Plus, you can sit and play along to a record for HOURS without even noticing it... because you're having fun, it doesn't feel like practice, but it is. No one is saying to transcribe everything and play exactly as recorded (although you can if you want), personally I prefer to play my own thing. Sometimes I'll try to add a second (or third) rhythm guitar part, or a melodic fill in between verses, and during the solo I will always improvise my own. On bass I will try to stick to the general idea of the bass line in the song while adding my own runs at points I feel like doing so or I'll try to play a song by one group in the bass style of another. You'll start to remember and recognize certain things while playing certain songs, you'll start transferring ideas over different songs in the same key, and it's like sitting in a chem lab mixing elements. I prefer that over an hour of mind numbingly boring scales and finger runs.
Last edited by Haynus_aynus at Nov 5, 2013,
#7
Quote by Haynus_aynus
I find this to be the best form of practice. It helps in pretty much every aspect, particularly your sense of timing. Records are never off. It also helps with ear training, memory, and building up your repertoire of material. Plus, you can sit and play along to a record for HOURS without even noticing it... because you're having fun, it doesn't feel like practice, but it is. No one is saying to transcribe everything and play exactly as recorded (although you can if you want), personally I prefer to play my own thing. Sometimes I'll try to add a second (or third) rhythm guitar part, or a melodic fill in between verses, and during the solo I will always improvise my own. On bass I will try to stick to the general idea of the bass line in the song while adding my own runs at points I feel like doing so or I'll try to play a song by one group in the bass style of another. You'll start to remember and recognize certain things while playing certain songs, you'll start transferring ideas over different songs in the same key, and it's like sitting in a chem lab mixing elements. I prefer that over an hour of mind numbingly boring scales and finger runs.
Hahah I'd have to agree, with the scale part they're so boring seriously. It's hard to really get motivated playing scales, but they help you to develop great technique lol.
#8
If you learn to play it note for note by ear, it improves your ear. You want to be able to play exactly what you hear, not just close to what you hear. The riffs you learn note for note will also sound a lot more accurate because you know exactly what notes and rhythms to play.

Also playing along with recordings improves your sense of rhythm and timing. You will play a lot more accurately than if you have no backing track. When you are playing at your own tempo (without backing track), you may slow down when there are fast parts and accelerate when there are slow parts. And you may not even notice it, unless you have a backing track. Also it's always fun to have the whole band playing the song. It may sound boring if there's just one guitar playing the main riff of the song without any background. When you can't jam with your friends, you can jam with your favorite bands.
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#9
it's a lot more fun than playing along to a metronome

pretty much what everyone else said
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