#1
Hello everyone, I'm kinda new to the forums here. I've mostly just lurked around and read threads and stuff but decided to go ahead and actually sign up today.

Anyways, moving on to my question. I've been playing electric guitar for 5ish months now. I've gotten hammer on/pull offs, and bending down for the most part expect when it comes to keeping beat and tempo.

When I play chords and solos, I don't have any trouble keeping tempo. However when I try to play something that involves bending and or hammer on/pull offs, I completely loose tempo and can't stick to the beat. I don't have a hard problems doing hammer ons/pull offs, and bending normally, but when I try to do it to a tempo, no matter how fast it is, I just can't keep to beat.

So my question is, is there any way I can practice at getting better with keeping tempo when doing hammer ons/pull offs, and bending?
#2
Do you a have a metronome? If not get one and make it your best buddy for the next few months.

Start playing slow, like really freaking slow. Then gradually up the speed while playing on the beat. And over time you'll jut get better. Thats how my guitar instructor got me to keep better time. It helped me with all my playing. Bends, tapping, everything.

If you play SLOW you can play ANYTHING!
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Last edited by Fallenoath at Nov 5, 2013,
#3
What the guy above me said.

You can also use somekind of software that will help you practice, like Guitar Speed Trainer or something alike.
#5
I do have a metronome. Like I said, I don't have any problem keeping beat/tempo when playing chords and solos. Just when I do hammer ons/pull offs, and bending do I get off tempo.

Fallen, I'll take your advice and start out really slow. Thanks.
#6
Quote by Tempoe
tap your foot


That's not the best advice cause you can change the tempo without notice. A metronome it's better cause it's a constant tempo.
#7
Quote by Skat3rat
I do have a metronome. Like I said, I don't have any problem keeping beat/tempo when playing chords and solos. Just when I do hammer ons/pull offs, and bending do I get off tempo.

Fallen, I'll take your advice and start out really slow. Thanks.


Actually starting slow might not be the best idea in this case, it gets harder to keep time when you're subdividing a beat the slower you go, particularly for weird numbers like 5 and 7.

Start out at a nice middle-pace, something like 85bpm, get really comfortable there. The idea is to start out at a tempo where the beats aren't horribly far apart but also that they aren't so quick that it's just a stream of notes. You need to be able to think about what you're doing but also be able to keep good track of when the last beat was.

Once you can do it well at a middling pace then start working with faster or slower tempos but neither extreme is good to practice at for this kind of thing.
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#8
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Actually starting slow might not be the best idea in this case, it gets harder to keep time when you're subdividing a beat the slower you go, particularly for weird numbers like 5 and 7.

Start out at a nice middle-pace, something like 85bpm, get really comfortable there. The idea is to start out at a tempo where the beats aren't horribly far apart but also that they aren't so quick that it's just a stream of notes. You need to be able to think about what you're doing but also be able to keep good track of when the last beat was.

Once you can do it well at a middling pace then start working with faster or slower tempos but neither extreme is good to practice at for this kind of thing.


OK, I'll do that instead. Thanks everyone for your help and advice.