#1
For the last few weeks I've been trying to write some stuff, but I've gotten frustrated with virtual instruments to try and write treble parts or lead parts (I don't play guitar or piano, and have always played low end even in elementary through to high school I played Baritone. If you can imagine my frustration now haha) But while researching and watching videos on YouTube I found Piccolo bass strings and I have some questions.

1- How much set up is required for them? What precautions do I need to take when preparing to put them on? Do adjustments only need to be made on the neck, or does my bridge need to adjusted in any way?

2- What is the best way to work my amp settings in YOUR opinion (I have a Fender BXR Bass 300c).

3- Which strings do YOU prefer? (For regular strings I haven't had to much exploration, I tend to use Ernie Ball strings. I always saw my step dad play them, kind of gave me the whole 'this is home' type feel I guess)

So yeah those are some questions I have, tell me if I posted this in the wrong place, or I totally have all of this off.
#2
To be honest take your bass to a professional set up shop, in less you understand what to do. Because of piccolo strings being light gauge, the bass tends to need some neck relief and bridge adjustments. Although it may not even need any adjustments.

For strings, I use D'addario Piccolo Bass 52 - 20. I started off using GHS Bloomers, but found they were too light (50 - 18) they stretch to easy and go out of tune. I've never seen an Ernie Ball set.

As for amps, the world is your pallet, I tend to use guitar tube combos, but started off using bass amps. You basically have the option of both when playing piccolo.
#3
Nah...
Gauge ≠ tension. Piccolo strings have more tension than normal bass strings, they're going to introduce relief into the neck, not the other way round.
Think about it, you've got these thing little strings and they're stretched 9-10 inches more than they're really supposed to and tuned to the same octave. The thinner strings are close to becoming a razor wire trap.

If you want to do it properly you will have to adjust your truss rod, re set your intonation and modify or replace your nut, if don't don't feel comfortable doing any of these things then you probably should just take it to a tech.
Basses:
Fender Precision Bass
Fender Jazz Bass
1967 Fender Coronado Bass II
Warwick Star Bass
Squier Precision Bass TB
#4
Because you will probably need to have a new nut cut specifically for those slender piccolo strings, it might be better to have one bass that is permanently relegated to piccolo duty. Then you could set it up just for that and not worry about anything. I wonder if some basses are more suited to that than others?
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#5
Quote by FatalGear41
Because you will probably need to have a new nut cut specifically for those slender piccolo strings, it might be better to have one bass that is permanently relegated to piccolo duty. Then you could set it up just for that and not worry about anything. I wonder if some basses are more suited to that than others?


Some stuff I've noticed it a lot of guys use short scale basses for piccolo