#1
I just got a flying V VMNT Mustaine real cheap and it has some fret buzz.

1. I don't want to fix it myself
2. I live in Calgary, Canada
3. I want it to still have low enough action to play lead well but not have the fret buzz
4. It buzzes on the low notes on E and A and fret 12-24 on the g string
5. What store can I take it to that will a)fix it b)treat my guitar with care. I would be distraught if it came back nicked, scratched or in any way damaged. I've never had a store do maintenance so I'm wondering if most of them have a guarantee on not damaging the guitar.

Any advice is greatly appreciated, this guitar is f'ing amazing and I want to get rid of the annoying fret buzz.
#2
look up some vids on adjusting action for tune o matics, and do it yourself, it's really easy.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ucbklsRmbjM&list=PL9FCB6BF5D065C296
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Originally Posted by Tulkas
Stairway is required on any list of anything involving the words guitar or song, I believe Congress amended the constitution in order to put it into federal law.
#3
Simply making adjustments may not be enough.

A nut that's cut too high is typical of Gibsons, for example, and if you adjust the bridge for lower action, you'll find that you're getting fret buzz on the upper frets.

A nut that's cut too low and you'll get buzz on the cowboy chord frets (1-5) when you adust the bridge for lower action.

It's imperative that your frets be level; if they're not, you'll not only have trouble setting the action wthout buzzing, but you'll likely also find that larger bends will fret out, even in the higher frets.

It's also important that the bottoms of the strings are "made aware" of the radius of the fretboard, usually by properly cutting the nut for the fretboard radius, checking the shims/adjustment screws on the bridge saddles and measuring with an understring radius guide.
#4
Quote by dspellman
Simply making adjustments may not be enough.

A nut that's cut too high is typical of Gibsons, for example, and if you adjust the bridge for lower action, you'll find that you're getting fret buzz on the upper frets.

A nut that's cut too low and you'll get buzz on the cowboy chord frets (1-5) when you adust the bridge for lower action.

It's imperative that your frets be level; if they're not, you'll not only have trouble setting the action wthout buzzing, but you'll likely also find that larger bends will fret out, even in the higher frets.

It's also important that the bottoms of the strings are "made aware" of the radius of the fretboard, usually by properly cutting the nut for the fretboard radius, checking the shims/adjustment screws on the bridge saddles and measuring with an understring radius guide.

all sounds good but I simply don't have time to learn this and fix it, too busy with University. I need a shop that will do this and not rip me off, I took another guitar to Long&Mcquade and it came back unfixed.
#5
Honestly, you're probably going to have to take the guitar to a quality luthier, and be prepared to wait until it is fixed. I had fret issues on my Gibson V and I took it to two local guitar shops because I wanted it done quickly, and both claimed to have "fixed the problem" but the fret buzz remained in numerous places. Finally I took it to a luthier - it costs me more money and it took longer for the the work to be done, but the guitar is perfectly setup now.

I would recommend doing some yelp research in your local area - just google "guitar luthier" and your city and then check the reviews.
Axes:
2010 Carvin ST300C
1994 Jackson Soloist XL Professional
2008 "Jacksbanez"
2007 Gibson Flying V
2003 Epiphone Les Paul Plus

Amps:
Peavey 6505+ Combo
Peavey Classic 30
Peavey Vypyr 15
#6
Why would you ask people on this forum to find a luthiers for you where you live? I understand you don't want to fix your guitar but at least fix yourself a place to take it for repairs.
#7
Quote by Vecheka
Honestly, you're probably going to have to take the guitar to a quality luthier, and be prepared to wait until it is fixed. I had fret issues on my Gibson V and I took it to two local guitar shops because I wanted it done quickly, and both claimed to have "fixed the problem" but the fret buzz remained in numerous places. Finally I took it to a luthier - it costs me more money and it took longer for the the work to be done, but the guitar is perfectly setup now..


We call anyone who builds a guitar from raw wood a luthier. This guy is a luthier, and an amazingly good one: http://www.classicalguitarbuilder.com/

We call anyone who fixes, tweaks and adjusts guitars that are already built a tech. This includes those guys who assemble telecasters from already-formed bodies and necks. This guy is a tech, but one of the best on the planet: http://www.brawer.com

I take guitars that need frets superglued and leveled (for example) to Gary (the tech listed above) and he runs them on his PLEK machine and turns them around pretty quickly. I expect *some* time to pass because he's busy, but a full PLEK run takes a few hours, and I've taken a guitar in to him in at 11 am and had it back in perfect shape by 7 that evening. It would have been 6, but we sat around jawing while he polished the frets and tweaked the Floyd till it was just so. That's NOT his normal turnaround, but I had to be 400 miles away the next morning, and I'd done maybe three grand worth of work with him over the previous few months and he hooked me up.