#1
I was looking at a blues scale tab in G, and noticed that the b7 was an F...I'm a bit confused because I understood F to be the M7 of...well basically any scale in G that has a M7...I thought since its a flattened seventh that it would be F down a half step making it an E....some clarity would be much obliged
#2
A major 7th, or leading tone, is a half-step below the octave. So for G it would be F#.
A minor/dominant 7th (your b7) is a full step below the octave, hence in G it is F.

Look at the major scale and how other scales relate to it.
#3
I didn't understood much of what you said but if your note is G then
the M7 is F# (not F)
the m7 is F
and b7 is Fb (enharmonic of E) as you said.

Fixed.
Last edited by SrThompson at Nov 6, 2013,
#4
Quote by SrThompson
I didn't understood much of what you said but if your note is G then
the M7 is F# (not F)
the m7 is F
and b7 is Fbb (enharmonic of E) as you said.


I'm not too sure about this. a m7 and a b7 are pretty much used to mean the same thing. The last thing would be a bb7, which in G is a Fb, which is enharmonic to E.
Fbb is enharmonic to Eb
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#5
In diatonic music, a m7 interval is the same thing as a b7 (you assume intervals to be major unless otherwise stated).
#6
Quote by SrThompson
I didn't understood much of what you said but if your note is G then
the M7 is F# (not F)
the m7 is F
and b7 is Fbb (enharmonic of E) as you said.


minor 7th = b7. So b7=F.

Fb is enharmonic to E, and would be a diminished seventh here. A bb7.
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#8
Quote by SrThompson
I didn't understood much of what you said but if your note is G then
the M7 is F# (not F)
the m7 is F
and b7 is Fbb (enharmonic of E) as you said.

No, a Fbb would be a dim7th. A b7 is always notated in blues/rock/metal/etc. as being 2 steps below the tonic.
#9
A b7 means that the major 7th is flattened. We always work from the major scale: G A B C D E F# G. So to flatten the 7th here, we just make it a natural: F.
#10
Quote by ryan.bollinger.
I was looking at a blues scale tab in G, and noticed that the b7 was an F...I'm a bit confused because I understood F to be the M7 of...well basically any scale in G that has a M7...I thought since its a flattened seventh that it would be F down a half step making it an E....some clarity would be much obliged


study the "blues scale" in G - it is a six tone scale...G Bb C Db D F (1 b3 4 b5 5 b7)

the "blue tones" are the b3 b5 b7..

a study of blues will help you understand some of mystery within blues structures..

the blues seems to be able to break most rules of theory..and quite a few of harmony..and many are glad it does..

wolf
#11
Quote by wolflen
study the "blues scale" in G - it is a six tone scale...G Bb C Db D F (1 b3 4 b5 5 b7)

the "blue tones" are the b3 b5 b7..

a study of blues will help you understand some of mystery within blues structures..

the blues seems to be able to break most rules of theory..and quite a few of harmony..and many are glad it does..

wolf

May I ask how? I don't think it does. In fact I don't think it's possible to.
#12
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
No, a Fb would be a dim7th. A b7 is always notated in blues/rock/metal/etc. as being 2 steps below the tonic.

Fixed. Sickz had it alr.
#13
Quote by wolflen

the blues seems to be able to break most rules of theory..and quite a few of harmony..and many are glad it does..



Theory (imo) is used to describe why something sounds the way it does. it's not a set of rules or limitations.
#15
Quote by macashmack
May I ask how? I don't think it does. In fact I don't think it's possible to.

Yeah, what rules of harmony and theory does it break? Blues uses very simple harmony - I, IV and V chords. Is it against theory to use dissonant/non-diatonic notes? No. Dissonance is used in all music. Non-diatonic notes are really common in every genre.

Theory can explain blues songs pretty easily. I mean, what parts of blues can't it explain?
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