#1
They had teachers, and classes just like we do today.
But surely Bach didn't learn minuet #3 when he was beginning, the song didn't even come into existence until much later. (He made it!)

What were the songs a beginner had to learn to progress, way bach in the day.
#4
They learned from the composers that came before them. You know people have been writing music for a while, right? You can look up stuff like "Bach's influences" and find articles about it.
#6
Of course I knew there were tons of composers before bach, I just wanted to know maybe a few songs children would learn in his era. In order to learn violin or what not.
#7
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Or just look at his catalogue and see that he transcribed like 10 Vivaldi concertos.


The opening of Bach's Passacaglia in C minor also bears more than a passing resemblance to Buxtehude's Passacaglia in D minor.

There's an orchestrated version of a mass by Palestrina in Bach's hand.

The most musically simple influences which runs through more than a few works by Bach are probably the Lutheran chorale melodies.
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#8
Quote by TheGreatTarp
Of course I knew there were tons of composers before bach, I just wanted to know maybe a few songs children would learn in his era. In order to learn violin or what not.

I'm...not really sure what you're asking. I don't think there was one unified regimen for learning an instrument.
#9
They learned from those who came before. People used to print up books of sheet music. I imagine that music teachers of the time knew enough about the pieces to determine when a student was ready to advance from basic to intermediate and intermediate to hard.
#11
I guess every great musician who started out learned that they had to connect with their music through experience. It was something drawn from inspiration

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#12
A lot of musicians in the past wrote their own damn etudes. Bach did so with the inventions, sinfonias, and the well tempered clavier. Bartok did the same with the universium or whatever the hell it is called. Hanon, czerny, liszt, and alkan all did the same with their progressive etudes.
#13
bach learned from hal leonard's series on playing the organ when he first started i believe
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#14
Quote by Hail
bach learned from hal leonard's series on playing the organ when he first started i believe


Yep, and he learned his theory from arguments between experts here at UG.
#15
Quote by GuitarMunky
Yep, and he learned his theory from arguments between experts here at UG.



missed you GM
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#17
Quote by :-D
they all learned from one of tom hess' ancestors

- Wasn't it tom hess himself? After all his disciples will tell you he is a dyslexic dog???

I just couldn't bring myself to type those words together, even in jest
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#19
They learned from scores and other composers/teachers. Counterpoint was the standard fundamental method until some time after Beethoven. Beethoven and Bach both learned counterpoint from Fux's "Gradus ad Parnassum", and Beethoven also worked out counterpoint examples based on Haydn's bass lines.
#20
Quote by cdgraves
Bach... learned counterpoint from Fux's "Gradus ad Parnassum",


Gradus ad Parnassum was first published in 1725. The first book of the Well-Tempered Clavier was completed in 1722. Do the math.
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#21
Quote by :-D
they all learned from one of tom hess' ancestors

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