#1
I recently bought a 2004 Quingdao made Epiphone Les Paul Standard. It's a really good guitar but I bought it with sort of high action. That's all fine and dandy, I just lowered the bridge. BUT. The high frets buzzed like crazy. I had to file (Sand) (I used grits up to 2000 so it's still smooth) them down drastically on the high side. and quite a bit on the bass side. and the bass still had to be raised up a little. Idk what the problem is. I haven't had a guitar to do this before, and I've given it the exact same setup I give all my guitars (minus a truss rod adjustment- itcould be my thicker strings warrant a truss adj.). I've never owned a Les Paul before, so it could just be that they have to be set up differently. Although I wouldn't think it would be too much different than a bolt-on Lp copy... I use .10, .13, .17, .42, .52, .60 strings tuned anywhere from drop c to standard if that helps any. Are there any ways to iron out this setup problem?
#2
did you check the neck relief? a backbowed neck can cause buzz even when the action on the high and low frets are too high. also if you change tunings a lot your setup isn't always going to be perfect and will probably need to redone more often. because when you loosen and tighten your strings you are changing the stress on the wood (so if the neck is straight when you are in standard it may bow forward in crop c), would be even worse if you had one with a floating bridge.

you should decide which tuning you are going to spend most of your time in before performing your setup, while always readjusting tuning throughout the process to make sure the neck is under the same pressure it will be once the setup is done (changing string gauge also means new setup) and in some climates or areas you may need to redo your setup with the seasons (its wood, it bends)

remember you can learn and play songs are that in drop c a step up in drop d, that's what I do to prevent needing to redo my setup all the time, I don't think 1 string being slightly looser will affect the relief too much. then if you need to perform in c you can do a setup before the gig.

anyway use a capo and a feeler gauge to check your neck relief before you even bother with the bridge and/or nut. once the neck is close enough to flat for your taste then use a straight edge to measure the string to fret height at the highest and lowest frets, adjust your bridge and nut accordingly until your action is of the desired height equally along the fretboard and each note sounds clearly

if you need a blow by blow on adjusting your neck's relief, bridge or nut, that's what google is for.
#3
Is it just the .60 that’s rattling at this point? Because once you slap a string that big on it’s going to rattle when you’re tuning down to C on a 24.75" guitar. Low tension = big wavelength, thick string = loud rattle. You’ll just get used to it after a while.
#4
Quote by SeamanTickles
I recently bought a 2004 Quingdao made Epiphone Les Paul Standard. It's a really good guitar but I bought it with sort of high action.


Uh...Why?


Quote by SeamanTickles
I just lowered the bridge. BUT. The high frets buzzed like crazy. I had to file (Sand) (I used grits up to 2000 so it's still smooth) them down drastically on the high side. and quite a bit on the bass side. and the bass still had to be raised up a little. Idk what the problem is. I haven't had a guitar to do this before, and I've given it the exact same setup I give all my guitars (minus a truss rod adjustment- itcould be my thicker strings warrant a truss adj.).


Okay, look. If you have a nut that's cut too high and you lower the action by lowering the bridge, the high frets will buzz like crazy. You do NOT start sawing at the frets.
High nuts are typical of Gibsons (not necessarily typical of Epiphones).

Step Away From The Sandpaper. Ooog.

IF you have level frets (this is job one) and if they're secure in their slots (I usually have mine superglued), then you can start setting things up. If you simply start sanding at frets, you will likely produce other problems. If you don't know how to check for fret level, stop now and go to a tech.

Very often, if the nut slots are too high, you'll need to take some nut files and adjust them. If you lower them too much, you'll get buzzing on the lower frets, though. You also need to be sure to follow the radius of the fretboard when you're doing all this adjusting, by filing both the nut AND tweaking the bridge saddles to the correct radius. If you have a good set of understring radius gauges, this isn't a tough job.

I usually hand any guitar that's new to me to my favorite tech and have him do a good initial setup. Sometimes this includes a PLEK job and it often includes a fret superglue (if you don't know what that is, ask). Once I get the guitar back, I have a baseline upon which to do my "touch-up" setups down the line.

I use .10, .13, .17, .42, .52, .60 strings tuned anywhere from drop c to standard if that helps any. Are there any ways to iron out this setup problem?


Folks that do a lot of alternate tunings *usually* have their guitars set up for a single tuning and then swap guitars. That's optimum. Otherwise, they have the guitar set up for the tuning they use most (or for one that's sort of in the middle, tension-wise, of the array of tunings they use) and then suffer with the tweaks necessary to get decent action on the other tunings. Obviously lower tunings will reduce tension and you'll have a neck that's going to begin to reduce its relief and back-bow a bit, while higher tunings will bow the neck and increase its relief. I gave up on all this and bought a guitar that allows me to do all the drop tunings I wish and it never changes the tension on the strings.