#1
Finally getting that 2i4 I've wanted for ages and I'm going to need some tips for how to best record something a bit out of my element recording-wise.

I'm a member of the Perth Hills and Wheatbelt Band, an internationally touring concert band that has decided we need some proper recordings. They've enlisted me to help do this (I'm the only member with any experience in this kind of thing).

As far as equipment I'll have the 2i4, a whole bunch of condenser mics (not sure of brands/models, they belong to the local school we rehearse in), and misc instrument cables and whatnot.

With that, I need to record a variety of instruments including Trumpets, Trombones, Tubas, Euphoniums, maybe Baritones, Flutes, Piccolos, Clarinets, Bass Clarinets, Alto Saxophones, Tenor Saxophones, Bassoons, Oboes, Piano, Bass Guitar, Drums, Percussion, and I've probably forgotten a few (basically, everything under the sun that can produce a noise). Of these though, I will only ever need to record four parts excluding percussion/drums and piano.

I have no problem using programmed drums/percussion samples if that will improve the overall sound. If I use programmed drums it will most likely be with Sennheiser DrumMic'A.

My plan was to find a matched pair of condensers, and set them up in some form of stereo configuration. My musical director though, believes that multitracking the parts would be a better idea. Although he's my senior in the band, he's a good friend and will defer to me on this if I explain to him why one way would be better than another, so I don't have to blindly agree with him.

So what would UG Recording do? Multitrack or Stereo Mics, or something else I haven't thought of yet?
#2
For jazz stuff it's really about the performance as a whole, so recording stuff separately is really a no no. Given your interface you're pretty limited. However, if you can find a decent sounding room a stereo recording with a matched pair would be okay. If not you could find a mixer and mix on the fly, recording straight to stereo. You'd need to be relatively experienced for that though.

for brass/concert band stuff a main pair recording will sound fine to great, depending on what mics you have and where you put them
#3
Are you guys seated/stand in a configuration that will allow for a good balance if you did a stereo recording? If the band has a really good conductor and you have a good hall to record in this is defiantly a really good option. I would highly recommend OMNI pattern microphones for this.
Multi-tracking would be so much fun for you! But can be tricky because if there is like 20 stereo (or even mono) audio tracks to mix, things can get quite small.

Have a blast!
#4
Quote by unofficiallyme2
Are you guys seated/stand in a configuration that will allow for a good balance if you did a stereo recording? If the band has a really good conductor and you have a good hall to record in this is defiantly a really good option. I would highly recommend OMNI pattern microphones for this.
Multi-tracking would be so much fun for you! But can be tricky because if there is like 20 stereo (or even mono) audio tracks to mix, things can get quite small.

Have a blast!

We can be seated in whatever configuration I want. The plan is not to record rehearsals or anything, it's for me and the MD to pick the best players we have for the instruments we're recording, set up for whatever will produce the best sound, then go. We have access to a few decent sounding rooms.

I doubt we'll have any omni mics, the condensers would have been bought with the intent of live use for the band, and assuming the school was intelligent that would mean some form of directional mics, omni would feed back too easily live.

As I said in the OP even though I am recording all those instruments, I'm not using them all on the same piece. The pieces we're (planning on) using are quartet parts, so there's only 4 main parts, some with optional drums or keyboard.
#5
Quote by chatterbox272

I doubt we'll have any omni mics, the condensers would have been bought with the intent of live use for the band, and assuming the school was intelligent that would mean some form of directional mics, omni would feed back too easily live.

assuming the engineer is intelligent an omni are amazing live if you know how to tune a p.a.
Last edited by unofficiallyme2 at Nov 11, 2013,
#6
If you can't use omnis, go for cardioids in ORTF. It's sort of a best of both between spaced omnis and a coincident pair.
#7
Apologies if I seemed condecending unofficiallyme2, I didn't mean to. It's more I know the kinds of people who are using the equipment and if I even asked them about pick up patterns they'd give me odd looks as if I was speaking another language.