#1
When learning new theory I sometimes think to myself:
"Am I ready for this?"
"Should I know x theory before y theory?"

etc...

Do you think learning theory should be structured? Or do you learn bits and pieces if theory that are unrelated?
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#2
Well it's not if you should learn it in a specific order, but you really must. Although this changes if you learn more, you can't just start learning about scales if you don't even know how flats and sharps work. Pretty logical, really.
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#3
Yeah, you need to know the basics first (obviously - if you don't know the note names and intervals, it will be pretty hard to understand anything) but after that I don't think you need to learn anything in a specific order. I think this applies to almost anything.
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Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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#4
I ask this because I've come to the point where I think I know most of the basics and I do have a desire to learn more music and improve my improvisation but I don't know where to go next.

Is it really just a case of grabbing something and learning it after you pass the basics?
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#5
Quote by BlueIceBox
I ask this because I've come to the point where I think I know most of the basics and I do have a desire to learn more music and improve my improvisation but I don't know where to go next.

Is it really just a case of grabbing something and learning it after you pass the basics?


This is kind of where I am at the moment. I consider myself fortunate that all of my musical education has been within structured environments. But now that I'm on holiday for the next 3 months or so I just going to venture onto some things. I want to look at some solo transcriptions, learns jazz standards, look at some Glen Miller and the Barry Harris method. Maybe that's too ambitious but the point is that I've got the basics down and now I'm just looking around at stuff that interests and excites me. It also helps that I want to be a composer so I really look for anything that I can add to my arsenal.
#6
Ear training. Do you understand the basics on paper only or can you for example name chords used in a song by ear? And even if you can, you can always improve your ear.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
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Hartke HyDrive 210c
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#7
I would say that you separate ear training and theory, but that there's def a structure for each one individually that needs to be followed.
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#8
Quote by robertwilliam9
I would say that you separate ear training and theory, but that there's def a structure for each one individually that needs to be followed.

Of course they are different but what do you do with all the theory knowledge if you don't have a good ear? You can only see things on paper if you don't have a good ear and music is all about sound - it doesn't work on paper.

And TS said he already knows the basics. I was wondering if he can for example figure out the chords of a song by ear. Sometimes people just understand what I-IV-V-I means but can't recognize it in a song.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#9
Quote by robertwilliam9
I would say that you separate ear training and theory, but that there's def a structure for each one individually that needs to be followed.


how do you get songs to breakdown and analyze with theory? not everything's gonna be set up and charted for you when you first run into it.