#1
My name is Nicholas Papadopoulos, I am from greece and my hobbies are digital music production / recording, PC Hardware, Digital Art: Photomanipulation, logo design and gaming.

I recently began a new hobby, playing an electric guitar!

Here is my Berdux 1300, I bought it about 150€ from a musical store.
Picture 1
Picture 2
Picture 3

At first when I went to the shop, I told the seller I would like a Guitar suitable for a begginner, he recommended me this as I was looking for the smaller guitars he told me to buy this instead but I was short on cash. This guitar was about 200€ but he managed to sold me for a good discount. So my thoughts are this is actually a freaking sweet looking guitar and I don't think I would be ever dissapointed.

You may noticed oxidized strings, this may be the reason of poor sound performance and quality, I will replace them soon after I will learn more about buying strings.

Secondly, I bought this 30Watt Philko DG-30R Tube AMP for 180€, again with a discount! Original price was 250€

Picture 1
Picture 2
Picture 3

I was not dissapointed either after learning how to tune a guitar correctly. I used GTune a free plugin available for any Digital Audio Workstation (DAW), and it helped me tuning the guitar to standard E A D G B E tune by reading the clean signal freq of each string.

My following issues and questions are:

Which strings should I buy?
I have trouble pressing the strings on the fret, especially the thin D G B E strings, they are rough and non flexible. I have a big trouble practicing pitch squeals and tremolos, it freaking hurts on fretting after practicing too much also, I am looking for more softer and flexible ones that can help me making those sweet tremolos and squeals.

Upgrading guitar: Which parts affect the sound quality?
I've been told its not only the importance of the strings, its also about the guitar.
Is it the obvious parts like the "magnets" ?



Do you need a Sweeper to make pitch queals?

Title.

Also if you guys have a linked cource or a procedure of chained tutorials (step by step, with parts) please share it with me.

At the moment I have only learned how to tune the guitar, how to get the tone you want, and reading tableture. I now practice on strumming and pressing frets.

Cheers.
Last edited by Fensonous at Nov 10, 2013,
#2
1. What scale length is your guitar? The scale length is the space between the nut and the saddles on the bridge- basically the scale length is the same length as the playable part of the strings. This matters because if your scale length is longer rather than shorter you typically use thinner strings.

Actually, a more straightforward way to measure this is to measure from the nut to the 12th fret and multiply that measurement by two; the 12th fret is always halfway down the neck, and this way you don't have to dick around with the saddles being adjusted differently.

If your scale length is 25.5", I would recommend either D'Addario nickel wound 10-46 strings or 9-42. Both would probably work, but again, thicker is tighter and thinner is looser. It is about the feel you like the most.

2. As for just the guitar itself, the biggest factor on tone is probably the pickups. The electronic components of an electric guitar are the most important parts of how the sound is made, and the pickups are pretty much what allows that all to happen. There are lots of mods to the electronics you can look up and solder in yourself, and you can get lots of different sounds out of a HSS pickup configuration like you have.

3. I'm not entirely sure what a sweeper is, but I am assuming it involves EQing. Yes, more treble will make harmonics ring out clearer, but you don't need anything special to do the technique. Stronger pickups, audio compression, and more gain also make harmonics ring out better as well, but there are downsides to using too much of these things. Clean technique is what you should probably focus on the most here. To make a long story short, you're just starting out, so you need to learn to walk before you can run. Focus on doing things so they sound good first- it makes everything way easier in the long run.

Hope that was helpful!
Quote by Jesus
Gaza Strip- home. At least it was before I fucked ereythang up...
Last edited by JimDawson at Nov 10, 2013,
#3
Thank you for replying Jim Dawson!

I just measured the distance from the nut until the bridge, with a result of 64.5 CM which is 25.4 inches. So I guess i will buy the 9-42 gauge strings.

Don't know how you guys named it but Sweeper its just a metallic handle attached to the bridge and its loosen; its used to bend notes, eitheir raise or drop the pitch.
I personally and some europeans call this thing a sweeper :P
Last edited by Fensonous at Nov 11, 2013,
#4
Sweeper its just a metallic handle attached to the bridge and its loosen; its used to bend notes, eitheir raise or drop the pitch.

Sweeper, eh? That's a new one on me!

It's also called a tremolo, whammy bar, wiggle stick and a bunch of other things.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#5
1. I’d say go for D'Addario 9-42 or 10-46 strings set. Or you can also use Ernie Ball Super Slinky 9-42 or 10-46 strings set.

2. Different types of modification can be done for an electric guitar. As for the tone production, the pickups of the electric guitar play vital role here. Your guitar has HSS pickup configuration. For better tone you can swap your stock pickups with aftermarket pickups.

3. This is actually called a Whammy bar/Tremolo arm that you are calling Sweeper. As for using this whammy bar, two of the most common bridge types are fixed bridge trem system (commonly used in Fender Stratocaster or similar types of guitar) and floating bridge Floyd Rose (this is used in many electric guitars made by different companies). Your guitar has a fixed bridge vintage trem system so you can use a whammy bar. But you will only be allowed to press the whammy bar down towards the body of your guitar which will lower the pitch of the string. On the other hand on Floyd Rose/bridge made similar to Floyd Rose, you can move the whammy bar either ways; that means you can push the whammy down and also you can pull the whammy bar up to increase the pitch of the sound.
#6
Quote by Fensonous
My following issues and questions are:

Which strings should I buy?
I have trouble pressing the strings on the fret, especially the thin D G B E strings, they are rough and non flexible. I have a big trouble practicing pitch squeals and tremolos, it freaking hurts on fretting after practicing too much also, I am looking for more softer and flexible ones that can help me making those sweet tremolos and squeals.

Upgrading guitar: Which parts affect the sound quality?
I've been told its not only the importance of the strings, its also about the guitar.
Is it the obvious parts like the "magnets" ?


Do you need a Sweeper to make pitch queals?

Title.

Also if you guys have a linked cource or a procedure of chained tutorials (step by step, with parts) please share it with me.

At the moment I have only learned how to tune the guitar, how to get the tone you want, and reading tableture. I now practice on strumming and pressing frets.

Cheers.

Congratulations on the guitar and amp, Nicholas! Here's to many years of enjoyable playing.

As for your questions, here's what I'd say.

1) D'Addario is a very common brand (I believe they're the most popular). One of the reasons I'd recommend them is because of their cost. I suggest buying a bulk box of them (as they are inexpensive) and change your strings regularly.

Common gauges are 8's, 9's and 10's (the number refers to the thickness of the smallest string -- the other strings are sized appropriately). As a beginner you might want to start off with 8's or 9's, just because they'll be easier on your fingers.

2) I wouldn't worry about upgrading your guitar. Save that money for a while. You may want to change the pickups or tuners or bridge at some point -- but maybe not. The thing that makes guitars sound the best is the fingers of whoever is playing it.

3) As others have said, it's called a "Whammy bar" or "Tremolo". You don't need one to do the technique called "Pinch Harmonics". It's a skill that you'll develop at some point.

4) There are many sources! If you're looking for a paid service I recommend Guitar Jamz. If you're looking for free instruction I recommend YouTube, specifically the guy that does Guitar Jamz, Marty Schwartz. His YouTube Channel offers TONS of free tutorials. Just search for "easy" or "beginner" on his channel and you'll find plenty of stuff.

Another good resource is Justin Guitar. He's fantastic, too.
Richard

I tried setting my password to "penis". It said my password wasn't long enough.

PRSi:
*ME Quatro
*CE-22
*SE Soapbar II
H&K TubeMeister
TC Electronic Nova System

PBT Native