#1
What sounds do you think are essential and you should be able to name by ear?

By 'sounds' I mean things like Major, Minor, Sus4, 7th, Diminished, etc.
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#2
All of them.
Quote by AlanHB
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#5
how about unison? then at least we wouldn't have so many shitty "guitarists" playing out of tune. i don't think this is too much to ask for.
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#7
Quote by supersac
this in a perfect world


unfrotunately major and minor is something anyone can do even if it"sad" and "happy"

Though I wouldn't say every minor chord sounds sad and every major chord sounds happy. For example play a chord progression Am-G-F-E and IMO the major chords don't sound "happy" at all in that progression.

And play C-Dm-G-C progression and IMO the Dm doesn't sound "sad" at all in that progression.

If you play a minor chord and a major chord out of context, yes the minor chord will sound "sad" and the major chord will sound "happy". But being able to recognize them out of context doesn't matter. You need to be able to recognize them in context.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Nov 11, 2013,
#8
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Though I wouldn't say every minor chord sounds sad and every major chord sounds happy. For example play a chord progression Am-G-F-E and IMO the major chords don't sound "happy" at all in that progression.


+1

also you need to be able to hear things like "chirp" and "bloom", according to TGP.
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#9
major and minor,

not everyone is into music, but this is something everyone should know c:
#10
Ideally you should be able to pick up the individual lines of a piece, particularly the top and the bass line, and understand how those work to form a whole.
.
#11
Maybe I'm an optimist but I think the ability to hear if you're in tune is a given for any musician playing in a public context.
.
#12
The tonal center.

Also the sound of your own guitar, and its place within the band.

Many guitarists do not listen to the sound that they are making, instead having reference to executing physical patterns on the fretboard. This can result in being out of tune, and more commonly, underbending notes and playing parts with no regard for the other instruments. It could not fit in with the timing/tempo/feel of the song, detract from the vocals or sound detached from the chord structure to start off.
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#13
Quote by AlanHB
The tonal center.

Also the sound of your own guitar, and its place within the band.

Many guitarists do not listen to the sound that they are making, instead having reference to executing physical patterns on the fretboard. This can result in being out of tune, and more commonly, underbending notes and playing parts with no regard for the other instruments. It could not fit in with the timing/tempo/feel of the song, detract from the vocals or sound detached from the chord structure to start off.

Or actually listening to other instruments, not just your own playing. I don't understand why it's so difficult. And also hearing when you hit completely wrong notes. Some people play off beat and don't recognize it. They just keep on playing their part, no matter how wrong it sounds like. Or maybe they are playing in the wrong key but just keep on playing because they don't listen to the sound. They just play.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#14
Quote by BlueIceBox
What sounds do you think are essential and you should be able to name by ear?

By 'sounds' I mean things like Major, Minor, Sus4, 7th, Diminished, etc.


Lots of things, but I definitely wouldn't recommend that you make a complete list of these things and then try to learn them that way.

You take in the stuff gradually over time. If you need direction get a teacher.
#15
As long as your musical intuition is strong enough I'd argue you can get by only knowing major and minor, with any other sounds just being "out". Assuming you're talking about guitars and soloing and all that stuff, anyway. Composition generally requires a bit more thorough understanding.

Although if we want to extend the idea of musical intuition you could possibly get to a point where conscious understanding of your own compositions is unnecessary, even at a very high level of complexity.
Last edited by TheHydra at Nov 12, 2013,
#16
Quote by TheHydra
As long as your musical intuition is strong enough I'd argue you can get by only knowing major and minor, with any other sounds just being "out". Assuming you're talking about guitars and soloing and all that stuff, anyway. Composition generally requires a bit more thorough understanding.

Although if we want to extend the idea of musical intuition you could possibly get to a point where conscious understanding of your own compositions is unnecessary, even at a very high level of complexity.

There are a lot more chords that are really common that aren't just major or minor chords.
#17
Quote by macashmack
There are a lot more chords that are really common that aren't just major or minor chords.

Is an understanding of them necessarily required though? For some people the world of diminished and augmented, dominant chords, jazzy chord extensions, etc. are something they encounter often but don't really care to consciously learn. It's just a big world of "out" tonality, or "blue" or whatever else. As long as they intuitively know how to use them when necessary, who cares if they can pick them out of a lineup?
Last edited by TheHydra at Nov 12, 2013,
#18
Quote by TheHydra
Is an understanding of them necessarily required though? For some people the world of diminished and augmented, dominant chords, jazzy chord extensions, etc. are something they encounter often but don't really care to consciously learn. It's just a big world of "out" tonality, or "blue" or whatever else. As long as they intuitively know how to use them when necessary, who cares if they can pick them out of a lineup?

If they know how to use them though doesn't that mean they can hear them? I don't think I follow.
#19
Quote by macashmack
If they know how to use them though doesn't that mean they can hear them? I don't think I follow.

I believe the thread is referring to being able to assign proper, specific names to the sounds.
#20
Quote by TheHydra
I believe the thread is referring to being able to assign proper, specific names to the sounds.

That's what you meant by picking them out of a lineup, gotcha.

Imo one who practices music of any type should really learn to hear and name all chord sounds. It can't do anything but open up new idea's and stuff to make your music more expressive.
Last edited by macashmack at Nov 12, 2013,
#21
Quote by macashmack
That's what you meant by picking them out of a lineup, gotcha.

Imo one who practices music of any type should really learn to hear and name all chord sounds and stuff. It can't do anything but open up new idea's and stuff to make your music more expressive.

I agree, but some people just don't have the mindset for learning a large amount of theory and I tend to think it's less and less pertinent past a certain point.
#22
Quote by TheHydra
I agree, but some people just don't have the mindset for learning a large amount of theory and I tend to think it's less and less pertinent past a certain point.

I agree. If I were a teacher, I would train my student's ears thoroughly so that when the theory is being examined it would click a little more easily, being understood as sounds rather than just abstract concepts.
#23
First post has it. Every sound you hear has a purpose and a name. Putting a name to the harmony isn't necessarily the most important part, but as much as possible, you need to be able to figure out what's going on by ear alone.

start with intervals and basic chord quality recognition, then move on to working with more musical examples. Always try to work out tunes by ear before looking them up.

Quote by macashmack
If they know how to use them though doesn't that mean they can hear them? I don't think I follow.


Not entirely. You can learn something by rote and really not understand the sounds on their own. This is the case with a lot of people who play music in high school and then do it in college; they're good at reading, good at technique, but have no concept of relationships or how to quantify the sounds in a useful way.
#24
Quote by TheHydra

Although if we want to extend the idea of musical intuition you could possibly get to a point where conscious understanding of your own compositions is unnecessary, even at a very high level of complexity.


the other thing is, if you are at that "intuition" level, trying to analyse it can actually screw you up if you're not careful

kind of like the way when you're walking up stairs perfectly fine on autopilot and suddenly start thinking about it and you trip.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?