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#1
Does anyone have experience with these or know someone who does? How did it work out?
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#2
I've been on them for a while. It's going pretty well.
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#3
My dad's been on them (can't remember which off the top of my head) and they've worked well for him, but they are generally really really different for everyone, and each med is different.
#4
I've been on over 15-16 in my life and none of them ever helped me.

Just me though. They work well for other people.
ayy lmao
#5
Thanks for the responses guys. My counsellor suggested something called SSRIs which are apparently meant to be really safe. I'm just kind of worried I could become dependent on them and I wouldn't be able to get happy without them. Also because I'd feel like an ass for having to resort to meds in the first place but that's a semi-unrelated problem.

There's also Cognitive Behavioural Therapy or something along those lines but I'm iffy on that because I wouldn't want to waste some psychologists time if there's someone who could potentially need it more than me.
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#6
It's funny you bring this up because after 7 years of trying and failing to deal with it on my own I've decided to go to therapy, and have my first session tomorrow.

My biggest fear is that they'll put me on something.
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#7
Quote by King Donkey
Thanks for the responses guys. My counsellor suggested something called SSRIs which are apparently meant to be really safe. I'm just kind of worried I could become dependent on them and I wouldn't be able to get happy without them. Also because I'd feel like an ass for having to resort to meds in the first place but that's a semi-unrelated problem.

There's also Cognitive Behavioural Therapy or something along those lines but I'm iffy on that because I wouldn't want to waste some psychologists time if there's someone who could potentially need it more than me.


You shouldn't feel like an ass for needing help. I really hope you find what you need, man. Depression sucks.

SSRI stands for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor btw.
ayy lmao
#8
Quote by King Donkey
Thanks for the responses guys. My counsellor suggested something called SSRIs which are apparently meant to be really safe. I'm just kind of worried I could become dependent on them and I wouldn't be able to get happy without them. Also because I'd feel like an ass for having to resort to meds in the first place but that's a semi-unrelated problem.

There's also Cognitive Behavioural Therapy or something along those lines but I'm iffy on that because I wouldn't want to waste some psychologists time if there's someone who could potentially need it more than me.
They take a while to kick in and you have to stick with them. Used in conjunction with therapy they're just a stepping stone to getting you healthy as long as you don't have any other major mental health issues. Even if you end up needing them for quite a while, you'll probably find it's worth it for the improved quality of life. You're not wasting anyone's time btw. If you get help, that's what those people are there for. They would like nothing more than to help you get well.
#9
Honestly I'd rather attempt to self-medicate with just about any other drug on the planet before I dived headfirst into a daily SSRI routine. I've known a few people on them and they would have all been a million times better off having never touched them. You should absolutely try CBT before you try any anti-depressant regimen.
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#10
Quote by seanlang01
They take a while to kick in and you have to stick with them. Used in conjunction with therapy they're just a stepping stone to getting you healthy as long as you don't have any other major mental health issues. Even if you end up needing them for quite a while, you'll probably find it's worth it for the improved quality of life. You're not wasting anyone's time btw. If you get help, that's what those people are there for. They would like nothing more than to help you get well.

nice said
#11
I took Zoloft for about 8 years and I didn't realize how much I hated it until I stopped taking it. I was later diagnosed with a clean bill of health so they were making me take chemicals to balance an imbalance that didn't actually exist; my parents were just bad parents so they thought I needed all kinds of meds.
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#12
Was on SSRIs for a while. They made me tired a lot of the time with questionable benefits. Also withdrawal from them is really annoying.
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#14
Didn't help me all too much when I was struggling with major depression. I never tried more than one SSRI though because I found cognitive behavioural therapy + guided meditation to be really helpful for me.

Mindful meditation is great and I really encourage you commit to it for at least a few weeks. An hour a day in 10-20 min intervals. Sounds like a lot but 20 min in the morning, 20 min in the afternoon/after getting home from school or work, and 20 min before bed is very manageable.

Give SSRIs a shot if you're comfortable with them. Coming onto them can be discomforting though - in my case I got even more depressed for the first 2 weeks. Individual differences though.

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy isn't a waste of time. It mainly works to identify and eliminate cognitive distortions. As seanlang says, you're not wasting anyone's time, therapists are there to help you. Thinking that you aren't worthy of help or are a lost cause is typical of major depression. Please seek help.
#15
I was on SSRIs for about 6 months, they were given to me by a physician at my college and was taken off them by my GP because he thought they were overkill. They helped me a little bit while I was working through some stuff and I felt better by the time I came off of them but in retrospect I don't think the drug did all that much for me compared to some changes I made in my life during that time.

Just know that if you decided to take them, it's at least a 2-3 month commitment, you have to spend a few weeks building up to a maintenance dosage and come off them over the course of about a month to minimize withdrawal symptoms.
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Last edited by thefuzz454 at Nov 11, 2013,
#16
Quote by VillainousLatin
I haven't taken anti depressants but I'm taking some meds to help with social anxiety and they are working wonders. I got my first job recently and it was probably partly due to the meds.


What exactly are you taking?
#18
I'm on bupropion now and have been for a few years. I still go through rough patches but I mostly find it working well in the long run.
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#19
Zoloft has been great for me with klonopin...mood stabilizer and relaxer. Actually feel more energetic. Zoloft gives a mellow mood feel.
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#20
I took Prozac and Zoloft but they didn't really help me so I got taken off of them.
I'm still ****ing miserable but maybe you'll have better luck.
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#21
Quote by NarwhalG2G
I took Prozac and Zoloft but they didn't really help me so I got taken off of them.
I'm still ****ing miserable but maybe you'll have better luck.


Just to add some personal experience, Prozac was a terrible drug for me.

It made me super, super angry. By far the worst drug I had ever taken.
ayy lmao
#22
I should probably be on them, but i've been addicted before so i've chosen not to.
Sail upon the open skies
#23
Thanks so far everyone.
Quote by Godsmack_IV
Didn't help me all too much when I was struggling with major depression. I never tried more than one SSRI though because I found cognitive behavioural therapy + guided meditation to be really helpful for me.

Mindful meditation is great and I really encourage you commit to it for at least a few weeks. An hour a day in 10-20 min intervals. Sounds like a lot but 20 min in the morning, 20 min in the afternoon/after getting home from school or work, and 20 min before bed is very manageable.

Give SSRIs a shot if you're comfortable with them. Coming onto them can be discomforting though - in my case I got even more depressed for the first 2 weeks. Individual differences though.

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy isn't a waste of time. It mainly works to identify and eliminate cognitive distortions. As seanlang says, you're not wasting anyone's time, therapists are there to help you. Thinking that you aren't worthy of help or are a lost cause is typical of major depression. Please seek help.
Yeah I think I'd rather try the CBT before SSRIs. At the moment I'm just not comfortable with the idea of doing them but that could change.

And my counsellor showed me a sheet with those cognitive distortions on them, I'm guilty of doing pretty much all of them.
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#24
I have been on CBT worked great for me, but I am also taking meds, SRRI (Luvox) and benzo (Klonopin)
#25
I've been on a few different types of anti-depressants. Zoloft and Cymbalta were the main two anti-depressants I took for a long period of time. They work wonders due to placebo effect, at first, but for me they actually turned out to have too many negative side effects. Zoloft made me unable to get angry and I was very tired. Cymbalta made it almost impossible to get an erection or keep it up long enough to achieve orgasm. Which was ruining my sex life with my girl at the time so I got off that shit.

I've smoked weed twice weekly alongside meditation and exercise for the past several years, and it has worked wonders in dampening my depression. Though I still take Lexapro for anxiety.

I recommend every alternative to prescribed anti-depressants before actually considering them, including psychotherapy.
#26
Quote by King Donkey
Thanks so far everyone.Yeah I think I'd rather try the CBT before SSRIs. At the moment I'm just not comfortable with the idea of doing them but that could change.

And my counsellor showed me a sheet with those cognitive distortions on them, I'm guilty of doing pretty much all of them.


I would recommend reading Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy by Dr David Burns. It's the book that popularized CBT and it was very helpful for me. It's easily available online *coughFILECROPcough*
#27
taking ssri's should always be paired with cbt. never take them if prescribed by a general practitioner. you should already be in therapy before the psychiatrist says you may want to try a ssri or snri. it isn't a cure it is a tool to help. coming from a pharmacy tech with a psychology bachelors degree.
#28
I have a few friends that probably wouldn't be here if they didn't take them.
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#29
i take an ssri. i'm bipolar though and i have panic disorder so it's hard to distinguish between all the meds and determine which is helping with what. ssri's have a lot of potential side effects. some people try one and feel no side effects while others have to try 3 or 4 to find one that doesn't make them feel sick or jittery or whatever. luckily there are lots to try. however there are some side effects, especially sexual ones, that can be very persistent for some people. alternatives to ssris exist but they're not generally as effective. it's a trial and error process.

really the problem with ssris is that they attempt to increase the presence of a neurotransmitter in certain parts of your brain where that will make you feel less shitty, but they do so by not only metaphorically dumping the neurotransmitter everywhere in your brain but also in your whole body. what this means in terms of side effects can range from not much to never again. you'll have to see. CBT alone is more effective then ssris alone and of course has no side effects so i recommend starting with CBT. a therapist can help you decide whether medication is the right choice or not. the vast majority of them (i've seen a lot) will understand if you say "i'm not sure about medication yet, i'd rather try this for a month or two". they may try to change your mind with a reasonable discussion, which is dandy, but if they won't shut their trap about meds even after you've made it clear that you're not currently interested then it's time to find a new therapist.

as far as therapists go, you could spend a year finding one you absolutely like but you have to consider that's really worth the trouble. if you can't communicate well with the therapist it's obviously a waste of your time. i recommend settling on the first on that makes you feel comfortable. also for some people, like myself, the gender of the therapist is important in how comfortable you feel. i've had great mental help from men before but i generally warm up to women faster. if you think you have a bias one way or the other, just roll with it. it's all about being comfortable, open, communicating well. find a therapist that gives you that and you're set.

i think it's pretty rare for people to walk away from therapy without improving at least a little. some people may deny it ("i don't need no darn therapist") but even forgetting coping strategies the therapists might teach you or new directions they can point you to, simply having the opportunity to talk to someone who understands how you feel (from a academic point of view and often a personal point of view) with totally privacy is extremely relieving. i highly recommend trying it. find someone you like and give them a few sessions. good luck.
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#30
Everyone knows anti-depressants are not only ineffective in 90% of cases but also are addictive and bad for your body and brain chemistry.

Just smoke some weed bro. At least you know it will make you happy for a few hours. Once you get used to it you wont feel all goofy and the "high"ness wont function to mess you up but rather to make you relaxed and stuff. You don't need to be stoned 24/7, but you can buy a pocket vape and when you're feeling an attack coming on just take a quick hit settle down and get on with your life.

I'm convinced the only reason anti-depressants have ever had market success is only because marijuana had been made illegal. I would bet that if marijuana had never been made illegal to begin with most commonly proscribed anti-depressants wouldn't have even been invented.
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#31
^terrible suggestion. Weed makes you complacent, which wouldn't help the unmotivated aspect of depression. And I say that as someone who absolutely loves weed.

As others have said, go for CBT first and foremost. It's what will have the most dramatic impact.

Also, if you eat a lot of processed foods, try changing your diet. I'm not saying it's the source of depression, but it definitely contributes more than you'd think.
Last edited by progdude93 at Nov 12, 2013,
#32
My girlfriend went on SSRI's for a bit to try and make some progress for her condition. She wasn't a fan. She didn't feel they helped her and she suffered from side effects quite badly. Night sweats especially were unpleasant. She then did CBT, yoga and increased exercise and she's feeling a lot better
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#33
Quote by vilk
Everyone knows anti-depressants are not only ineffective in 90% of cases but also are addictive and bad for your body and brain chemistry.

Just smoke some weed bro. At least you know it will make you happy for a few hours. Once you get used to it you wont feel all goofy and the "high"ness wont function to mess you up but rather to make you relaxed and stuff. You don't need to be stoned 24/7, but you can buy a pocket vape and when you're feeling an attack coming on just take a quick hit settle down and get on with your life.

I'm convinced the only reason anti-depressants have ever had market success is only because marijuana had been made illegal. I would bet that if marijuana had never been made illegal to begin with most commonly proscribed anti-depressants wouldn't have even been invented.

"Just smoke some weed," says the guy with no training in mental health and likely doesn't understand anything about anti-depressants.

"I want some info on anti-depressants."
"Shit maaaaaan, don't feel depressed, just smoke some weed to help you relax."

I mean, what in the fuck?
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#34
srs tho, if people here have an aversion to SSRIs for whatever reason, they might want to investigate st john's wort, which scores mildly-moderately above placebo in the treatment of depression.

If you're going to refuse to take anti-depressants, fine, but know natural alternatives if you're going to do that. I'm not saying it's natural therefore it's better, just that there is a remedial alternative.
#35
i've been on and off medication for the past 2-3 years. my first one (mirtazipine) didn't help at all, made me feel tired and shitty all of the time. then i was put on citalopram on top of that one. had a nice come up the first day but eventually i ended up in the ER that night because of a bad reaction or something, suspecting it was probably serotonin toxicity.

after that incident i quit cold turkey, felt like i was going to die for a week and a half. could barely sleep, had frequent panic attacks, sweat alot, had worse nightmares than usual, etc etc. when i was through that shit i did pretty good until a few more months down the road and ended up trying to hang myself. couple months after that, started on sertraline and it's working okay i guess. the come up when i started it was god awful though.
#36
Quote by vilk
Everyone knows anti-depressants are not only ineffective in 90% of cases but also are addictive and bad for your body and brain chemistry.

Just smoke some weed bro. At least you know it will make you happy for a few hours. Once you get used to it you wont feel all goofy and the "high"ness wont function to mess you up but rather to make you relaxed and stuff. You don't need to be stoned 24/7, but you can buy a pocket vape and when you're feeling an attack coming on just take a quick hit settle down and get on with your life.

I'm convinced the only reason anti-depressants have ever had market success is only because marijuana had been made illegal. I would bet that if marijuana had never been made illegal to begin with most commonly proscribed anti-depressants wouldn't have even been invented.


funny, the reason i quit smoking weed is because it made me at least twice as depressed once i came down. and after smoking it for awhile i started getting panic attacks every time i got stoned. a couple months before i quit, i only smoked it because its effect on my music experience. not because it calmed me down, or even necessarily made me happy. it just made me forget my constant boredom with everything.

weed is not foolproof. neither are antidepressants. the major difference between them is that the latter doesn't make you high, which ultimately forces you to deal with your problems in a neutral state.
#37
I took several different drugs at various times in different dosages for depression and anxiety. Could never get it to work for me. Trazodone and Celexa made me a zombie, Prozac made my anxiety issues worse, etc. It was awful for a while, so I stopped taking them.

It's still a struggle, but I prefer the way I feel off of drugs than on them. But that's just me.

I also went through therapy, which I didn't enjoy, but I would recommend at least giving it a shot. If for no other reason than to learn more about the problems you are having and maybe a few ways on how to deal with them.

Edit: I never really liked doing too many recreational drugs either.
Last edited by iwannabesedated at Nov 12, 2013,
#38
Quote by iwannabesedated
I took several different drugs at various times in different dosages for depression and anxiety. Could never get it to work for me. Trazodone and Celexa made me a zombie, Prozac made my anxiety issues worse, etc. It was awful for a while, so I stopped taking them.

It's still a struggle, but I prefer the way I feel off of drugs than on them. But that's just me.

I also went through therapy, which I didn't enjoy, but I would recommend at least giving it a shot. If for no other reason than to learn more about the problems you are having and maybe a few ways on how to deal with them.

Edit: I never really liked doing too many recreational drugs either.

So, you don't wanna be sedated?
what other lies don't I know about
#39
drugs are bad, mkay

especially the ones your doctor prescribes
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#40
One of my relatives has tried almost every type of antidepressant and her favorite was called Remeron (although I think tri-cyclics carry a greater risk of toxicity than the others, so be careful about beer/tylenol/etc).

But yeah it should be taken in conjunction with therapy of some kind as others recommended, hope it works out!
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