#1
I just got this pedal from the store a few hours ago, and i love it.
However, I've encountered a problem. When it's hooked up to an external power source, it works fine. But when I try to use it with a 9 volt ( as i will be when playing live ), it works for a few minutes and then shuts itself off. The 9 volt battery is brand new and works with other appliances. I read the manual and couldn't find anything about this. Also, as soon as it turns off, it creates this odd squealing sound through my amp. When I try to turn the pedal back on, it won't, unless I plug it back into the power source.

Any help with this would be greatly appreciated as I would be pretty frustrated to have to return this to the store and wait for them to order a new one.
#2
How long is a few minutes? Is it like 2 or is it maybe 20?

Digital delays can draw tons of power and you may just be sucking the battery dry, or at least too low for that particular pedal to work, in 20 minutes. I had a digital reverb a while ago that would take a 9V from new to unusable in half an hour. I don't know why they even bother putting battery clips in some of these high-draw pedals.
#4
Quote by NakedInTheRain
yeah digital pedals generally suck batteries dry ridiculously quickly. you need a power supply to gig with them.


(I meant to quote you both but I'm dumb and don't know how yet, so no disrespect to the guy who replied first )

But--I did the 9-Volt-Tongue-Test and it's still got juice! lol. I've had it on for over 20 minutes so I guess that could be it. I would be happy if that's the problem, I was afraid there was something wrong with the wiring and I would cry. I don't know if I've ever loved a pedal so much. I was able to trade my Suhr Riot Distortion straight up with my friend who works at a guitar shop.
#5
yeah the tongue test gauges that there's still juice left in the battery, but as the charge of a battery depletes, its voltage drops. digital pedals need a minimum voltage to work properly, and once the supply drops below that, they won't work.
#6
Quote by NakedInTheRain
yeah the tongue test gauges that there's still juice left in the battery, but as the charge of a battery depletes, its voltage drops. digital pedals need a minimum voltage to work properly, and once the supply drops below that, they won't work.


Thaaaaat makes sense. I was taking the battery out, licking it, fiddling with the attachment and then it would work for a few seconds and die directly after. Thanks man. I had no digital delay pedals ate battery so quickly. What can I do playing live where there isn't a free power connection?
#7
Yea, almost every digital pedal uses a linear regulator to drop the 9V supply to 5V (or even 3.3V) to power the DSP with. The problem with linear regulators (unless they're special low drop out voltage models) is that they usually need ~1.5-2V above what the output voltage is to work. So anything below about 7V is too low to power the Flashback correctly, though the analog part of the circuit may still be running, and can be the source of the squealing you hear. 7V is more than enough for most analog effects though. The Flashback will drain a battery from 9V to 7V in about 20-30 minutes easy, and won't work after that.
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#8
Quote by RyanMW2010
Thaaaaat makes sense. I was taking the battery out, licking it, fiddling with the attachment and then it would work for a few seconds and die directly after. Thanks man. I had no digital delay pedals ate battery so quickly. What can I do playing live where there isn't a free power connection?


There are power packs, something like this: http://www.guitarcenter.com/Pedaltrain-VOLTO-9-Volt-Rechargeable-Power-Supply-J01229-i3349770.gc

However, many venues should have their own power supply. Unless you're busking on the street, I can't think of many places that wouldn't have an electrical outlet. Even when busking, there are the odd outlet outside.

Delay pedals take power like nobody's business, so you should have a daisy chain/power supply for your pedals anyways, imo.

I'm not the greatest on this topic so I would see what everyone else has to say before going out and buying that Pedaltrain Volto.
Caution:
This post may contain my opinion and/or inaccurate information.

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#9
The Volto is a cool enough concept, but there have been some build quality issues in this first run, IIRC. Mostly to due with the plastic casing coming apart with light use. You could build your own battery pack, and there are plenty of tutorials online.
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#10
if i have a 9 volt in there and it's also connected to a power supply, will the 9 volt still drain or will the power supply take precedent?
#11
It won't drain if the pedal gets a power supply connected to it at the same time, the PSU takes over.

I wouldn't run the TC on a 9V battery, that pedal takes up I think 100mAH & a 9V battery is somewhere like 300mAH max capacity. 300/100 is 3hrs before it reaches zero voltage. But when your drawing current from the battery, the overall voltage starts dropping as well, so within an hour or so it will have about 150mA, say the voltage is roughly about 4.5V at this point, this is way lower than what the pedal needs. So either the TC will stop working or start making weird noises.

It's best to get a dedicated adapter for it or a separate PSU, look at the Trex Fuel tank Junior, or a better one would be the BBE Supacharger(more options, more max limit for mA per outlet).
#12
The Flashback draws 86mA. A carbon-zinc battery (dollar store type) has an average capacity of 400mAh, while an alkaline has about 550mAh, rated at 20 hours. To calculate the time it would take to drain the battery beyond use is t=Q/I^1.3, where Q is capacity and I is current draw. However, as I explained earlier, the regulator needs about 1.5-2V above the output voltage (5V, IIRC) to function, and the minimum voltage for the op amps to function is I'm sure between 3 and 5V.

And technically, voltage doesn't drop as much as internal resistance rises, causing the output voltage to drop lower with higher current draws than with lower ones. So the voltage you measure at the TC's input with a given battery will be lower than what you measure with say a Tubescreamer.
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#13
haha it DOES make weird noises when the battery is almost dead. I was like "WTF is happening to my amp!?" It sounded like a disco.