#1
F, G, B

or

|---|
|-0-|
|-0-|
|-3-|
|---|
|---|

Its probably obvious? Its in some sheet music I'm learning, but it doesn't say what it is?
#3
Thank you! I think you are correct

Its from my modern day guitar method book. I forget the song name. This chord is used quite a lot through some of the pieces and resolves nicely on a C major chord.
#4
Quote by Funky Monk Funk
This chord is used quite a lot through some of the pieces and resolves nicely on a C major chord.

I'd just like to contribute a useful snippet of theory - the dominant seventh (or if you like, the chord of the 5th degree of a key, with a seventh added) will always pull VERY strongly towards the tonic chord - and is unlikely to resolve anywhere else, outside of genres such as Jazz. In other words you are quantifiably correct when you say it resolves nicely to C major. I don't wish to sound snobbish at all, but this is a common chord change that you can learn quite easily to identify by ear in all keys.

EDIT: In this example the inversion reduces the gravity of the chord change slightly, but you can definitely hear the pull back to the tonic chord, no? Particularly the top B of the G7 rising up a semitone to C when you change back to Cmaj.
Last edited by ab ovo at Nov 12, 2013,