#1
My 9 year old wants rocksmith. My full size strat was just WAY to large to even consider. Will a 3/4 size guitar work correctly with the game? If so, please suggest a decent 3/4 size guitar under $200 usd.
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#2
Yes, a 3/4 will be fine. The Squier Mini Strat or the Epiphone Pee Wee are the only options I'm aware of under $200. There's not exactly a lot of selection on the 3/4 market.
#3
There's also the Ibanez Mikro series. They're $149. 22" scale

Rondo Music (online only) makes a 24" scale strat. $99 with little amp and gig bag.
#4
Thanks for letting me know 3/4 size will work. I kinda forgot to mention the guitar needs to be a lefty.. Any suggestions? I didn't see any of the suggestions in a lefty.
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#6
Quote by cooper1965
Thanks for letting me know 3/4 size will work. I kinda forgot to mention the guitar needs to be a lefty.. Any suggestions? I didn't see any of the suggestions in a lefty.


Maybe this would be a good occasion for him to learn on a righty? Lefty guitarists are the unluckiest people on the planet in terms of gear selection... Seeing as how he's still very young and knows nothing about playing guitar yet so he'll struggle either way maybe you'd be doing him a favor in the long run?
#7
Quote by flexiblemile
Maybe this would be a good occasion for him to learn on a righty? Lefty guitarists are the unluckiest people on the planet in terms of gear selection... Seeing as how he's still very young and knows nothing about playing guitar yet so he'll struggle either way maybe you'd be doing him a favor in the long run?


Plenty of left handed people play right handed guitars. The instrument requires both hands anyway.
#8
To TS

I agree with the above^^

The dominant hand should be the picking/strumming hand in an ideal world.

However, I have seen so many left handed people complain of lack of guitars when they are 5 - 10 years into playing, that right handed might be better.

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#9
Quote by xxdarrenxx
The dominant hand should be the picking/strumming hand in an ideal world.


I’ve never really thought that notion makes much sense. Unless you’re just fingerpicking cowboy chords, the dominant hand is the one doing the easy work.
#10
Quote by jpnyc
I’ve never really thought that notion makes much sense. Unless you’re just fingerpicking cowboy chords, the dominant hand is the one doing the easy work.


Because of rhythm.

Your right hand dictates the groove, which is far more important.

Paul gilbert plays the most standard of patterns in the left hand, yet he's praised as amazing, solely because of his dominating right hand. Without his right hand, it's pretty much pentatonic figures (although recent years he is venturing slightly more into other stuff)

The picking hand is largely deemed as less worthy, which in turn creates wank guitarist who sound the same with no groove.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Nov 14, 2013,
#11
Quote by jpnyc
Plenty of left handed people play right handed guitars. The instrument requires both hands anyway.


Virtually every other instrument on the planet gets played just one way, no matter what "handed" you are. Piano, brass, woodwind, drums.

Teach your son to play guitar with right handed guitars; don't let him descend into the mental morass of left-handed guitars <G>. As mentioned by JPNYC, plenty of left-handed people play right handed guitars (Neal Schon of Journey seems to have done well enough that way, for example). He'll have FAR more choices if he plays righty.

That said, SX and Douglass have lefties. Rondomusic dot com has a lot of lefties. Carvin will build you most of what they make in lefty. Gibson and Fender, not so much.
#12
Well you guys have really got me thinking now about possibly having him play right handed. I'm not really sold on the thought though. I want it to be as easy as possible, especially starting out. I have definitely noticed the short selection of left handed guitars just in this one venture. To me though, if he does take it seriously, and really gets into it, I wouldn't mind spending the kind of money it would take to get a left handed guitar (custom shop) in exactly what he wants. So i'm kinda at a crossroads here....
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Last edited by cooper1965 at Nov 14, 2013,
#13
I don't think learning to play left-handed guitars just because he's left-handed will give him any advantages. Starting out left or right-handed, it's going to be a huge hurdle to earn the skill. As much as I would like to learn to play left-handed guitars for the sake of experiencing the beginning stages of learning the instrument all over again, I'd hate myself if I fell down the lefty guitar path. There's just so little out there.

But, it's your decision. Do what you think is best. You could always get two cheap guitars. One left, one right. See which one he is most comfortable with. Maybe take him to a shop.
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#14
I'd strongly suggest teaching him righty. Guitar doesn't actually have a dominant handedness, it is perfectly fine for someone to learn either way, but learning lefty is just going to be such a drag for him later on for a lot of reasons. People can play piano with both hands, you type on a keyboard with both, etc. This isn't like baseball where your body has a strong preference for strength, or writing where there is a strong preference for very fine motor control. Guitar doesn't really have a dominant and non-dominant hand preference, so there is really no reason to wedge him into a "lefty."
#15
Quote by Roc8995
I'd strongly suggest teaching him righty. Guitar doesn't actually have a dominant handedness, it is perfectly fine for someone to learn either way, but learning lefty is just going to be such a drag for him later on for a lot of reasons. People can play piano with both hands, you type on a keyboard with both, etc. This isn't like baseball where your body has a strong preference for strength, or writing where there is a strong preference for very fine motor control. Guitar doesn't really have a dominant and non-dominant hand preference, so there is really no reason to wedge him into a "lefty."



I would disagree.

Why does a midi drum file not have the same groove as a drummer if both play the exact same patterns, or a midi guitar file playing the exact same notes as a real guitarist.

For that matter, 2 guitar players playing the exact same notes with the left hand do not sound the same.

The picking hand is definitely more dominant in feel.

Your examples of piano and keyboard are inadequate, because they both input at the same thing, and would be analogous to left and right hand both strumming or both fretting simultaneously.

That being said, hearing the "pain" of many left handed players not being able to play that classic strat or most guitars for that matter, and taking into consideration he's "Fresh" right handed may be better.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Nov 14, 2013,
#16
But is the pick hand more dominant because of an inherent handedness, or because of what you are asking it to do? I don't see any reason to call it inherent. There's not a serious difference in strength required, and you could even make the argument that your dominant hand should be the fretting hand, because it's more used to being precise. Simply saying that the feel is more dominant does not mean that the practice itself has a "handedness."

My analogy was to show that both hands are perfectly capable of the type of dexterity required for fretting. Obviously I was not trying to suggest that both hands do the same thing on a guitar. The idea was that there are lots of activities that do not have a hand preference, and I think guitar is one of them. The ones I listed were symmetrical, but things like shifting/steering while driving, using a fishing pole, and many forms of dancing could be examples of non-symmetrical activities that do not show a significant hand preference.

I don't understand why you included midi files or sounding different as arguments. Of course people sound different, and machines sound different. I don't see the relevance there. Saying that it happens in the picking hand doesn't necessitate that the picking hand be the dominant hand. It may be dominant within the confines of the activity you're doing, but your body doesn't have a preference for one over the other unless you train it to have the preference.
#17
Quote by Roc8995
But is the pick hand more dominant because of an inherent handedness, or because of what you are asking it to do? I don't see any reason to call it inherent. There's not a serious difference in strength required, and you could even make the argument that your dominant hand should be the fretting hand, because it's more used to being precise. Simply saying that the feel is more dominant does not mean that the practice itself has a "handedness."

My analogy was to show that both hands are perfectly capable of the type of dexterity required for fretting. Obviously I was not trying to suggest that both hands do the same thing on a guitar. The idea was that there are lots of activities that do not have a hand preference, and I think guitar is one of them. The ones I listed were symmetrical, but things like shifting/steering while driving, using a fishing pole, and many forms of dancing could be examples of non-symmetrical activities that do not show a significant hand preference.

I don't understand why you included midi files or sounding different as arguments. Of course people sound different, and machines sound different. I don't see the relevance there. Saying that it happens in the picking hand doesn't necessitate that the picking hand be the dominant hand. It may be dominant within the confines of the activity you're doing, but your body doesn't have a preference for one over the other unless you train it to have the preference.


Yes the fretting seems to be more precise, but only on superficial level if you ask me. It's more horizontally varying, where the picking hand is more on the vertical level of things.

I'd say there's so much more micro management in the picking hand, but being overseen, because this happens mostly on intuitive level, and is named by various names as "feel" or "emotion" and Jazz-ers like to call it "swing".

Yes everything has been done the other way around, but this doesn't come as easy for everyone.

And I don't think of the dominant hand based on strength, but based on speed and reaction ability as well, which is superior in this hand.

Rhythm is in most music superior (not all) but in most, and is definitely the one having the most impact.

Whole genres are built on rhythm, and now there's a borderline genre even based mostly on the picking hand called "Djent", so much influence it has.

Since right hand dictates the rhythm, as a hi-hat does for a drummer (which also is played awkwardly criss-cross handed by drummers, purely for dominance sake), I view the picking hand as needing to be the superior one.

EDIT; Btw I was under the impression, the dominant hand is more advanced than the other in precision.

Sorry for the long post btw

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Nov 14, 2013,
#18
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Yes the fretting seems to be more precise, but only on superficial level if you ask me. It's more horizontally varying, where the picking hand is more on the vertical level of things.

I'd say there's so much more micro management in the picking hand, but being overseen, because this happens mostly on intuitive level, and is named by various names as "feel" or "emotion" and Jazz-ers like to call it "swing".

Yes everything has been done the other way around, but this doesn't come as easy for everyone.

And I don't think of the dominant hand based on strength, but based on speed and reaction ability as well, which is superior in this hand.

Rhythm is in most music superior (not all) but in most, and is definitely the one having the most impact.

Whole genres are built on rhythm, and now there's a borderline genre even based mostly on the picking hand called "Djent", so much influence it has.

Since right hand dictates the rhythm, as a hi-hat does for a drummer (which also is played awkwardly criss-cross handed by drummers, purely for dominance sake), I view the picking hand as needing to be the superior one.

EDIT; Btw I was under the impression, the dominant hand is more advanced than the other in precision.

Sorry for the long post btw

Drummers can play the hi hat with both of their hands. You usually start it with right hand because it's easier to have one hand playing the snare and one playing other stuff. But good drummers can use both hands however they want.

This video pretty much proves it:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ItZyaOlrb7E

It may be easier to start with right hand playing hi hat but as I said, good drummers can use both hands equally well. Otherwise their fast fills would sound really sloppy. And I don't think playing hi hat with your right hand is awkward at all.

Also, violin is kind of like a guitar but there are no left handed violins. I mean, you have the bow hand and fretting hand or whatever they are called. And the hand that holds the bow is always your right hand. And it does exactly the same thing as pick does on guitar. But there are no left handed violins or cellos.

If I started playing the guitar left handed, I'm pretty sure I could learn it pretty well. But I'm not going to do it. I agree that it could be a bit easier in the beginning to start "left handed". But as people have said, you will struggle any way in the beginning. Right handed playing may feel a bit awkward in the beginning (and so will left handed but a bit less awkward) but I think it's worth it. Left handed guitars are more rare and also more expensive.
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#19
Didn't say anything about superior, though I disagree with that, too. I still don't think any of those things point to necessitating using your dominant hand for one or the other. If you can dismiss fretting as only marginally more precise, surely we can then dismiss picking as marginally more forceful?

Let's go back to the thing you dismissed before - piano players generally play the rhythm or harmony part with their left hand and the melody with the right. Does this not refute your idea that both hands are doing the same thing, and that rhythm should be done with the dominant hand? Not to mention that drummers have an awful lot more force and stamina required in comparison to strumming.

I don't know, we see so many lefties who pick up a righty guitar (or even the other way around) and learn it that way, and it seems that the difference there is so trivial and fluid that I believe that pretty much anyone could learn it very proficiently either way. But when you look at strongly handed activities like throwing a baseball, something mechanically there generally keeps people with a really strong preference that cannot and should not be changed. So I don't think the guitar has a strong handed preference, and from an evolution standpoint that makes sense - throwing, and fine motor control have a strong tendency towards handedness, but things in between do not, hence guitar, piano, typing, etc, do not necessarily need a dominant preference. The guitar is in fact one of the few string instruments that has a wide acceptance of "left-handed" as a legitimate convention.
#20
True piano but the factor of having the same input is something that can't be neglected.

Whether it has impact or not, it cannot be proven.

It also is an instrument designed in a time where harmony was far more "important" if you will than rhythm, where today's music is almost the polar opposite.

We could argue the complexity of their accelerando's and ritarnuando's, but for another time.

What has not been proven, but has been the by far most popular choice of setup is dominant hand for rhythm, other hand for following that.

I think this discussion boiled down to dominant hand for rhythm or not.

Maggara you said the violin has to be played with the right hand as the rhythmic hand, this is probably due to right hand being the dominant no, in train of thought at least.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Nov 14, 2013,
#21
Erm, nope. Lefties play violin with the bow in the right hand as well. Works just fine. Same for every other string instrument. Convention doesn't mean that the people who chose the convention were correct.

And how can you say that rhythm became more important in reference to piano convention when the opposite convention is true of the guitar despite it being an older instrument?

I don't see what tempo changes have to do with anything, maybe you just wanted to type out some big italian words you heard from classical music? Here, have some more!
Scordatura
Portamento
Rallentando
Sforzando
Appoggiatura

And those are all spelled correctly!

Nothing personal, but it seems like you're just dropping terms and making stuff up when it suits you and then saying "we can't know" when it doesn't.
#22
^ Yeah, and also you need both hands to do tempo changes. Hands need to be in synch. Your playing is as good as your weaker hand is. Because again, hands need to be in synch. You can't pick faster than you fret and you can't fret faster than you pick. And you can't pick more accurately than you fret and you can't fret more accurately than you pick.

As said, guitar is one of the few instruments that have both "left handed" and "right handed" versions. BTW, if you play classical guitar, are there left handed classical guitars too? And if there are, when were they invented? I mean, if they became popular, did they become popular pretty recently (in the 20th century) or has there always been left handed classical guitars?

As I said in my previous post, yes, it may feel a bit more natural to start with a left handed guitar. But both ways will feel awkward in the beginning. I'm sure there are lots of good left handed guitarists who play right handed so it shouldn't have that big of an effect on your playing.
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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Nov 14, 2013,
#23
It may be a little extreme, but I feel like guitars should have a standardized handedness like many other classical instruments, whether they are stringed or woodwind instruments. I feel, and this thread is a factor in my thinking so, that there will be much less confusion with learning how to play guitar if there is only one handedness.

However, I do have a friend who is left handed, and plays lefty trumpet, so I know those exist. On guitar however, he plays "regular" right handed, because of a condition in his right hand that also restrains him from being able to tap on guitar, but he's fine with regular picking.

Drumming I feel is a bit different. There is no inherent way to set up a drum kit. There might be a more traditional, more efficient way to set up, but your toms, cymbals, snare, cowbell, etc., do not have places there are supposed to be, only places where they should be to work best for the drummer in question.

In the long term, aspiring guitar players should learn how to play righty, because there are ten fold more options for them in guitars, and lefty guitars are usually more expensive than their righty brethren.
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#24
get a Ibanez Mikro , nice little 24 fret guitar , I bought a red one today brand new for 139.00 dollars , I have bought a few Mikro's over the year for grand kids , they hold up , sound good with pretty decent quality considering the low price ..... I'm left handed and play guitars and sports right handed , I do eat and write left handed , teach him right hand for guitar and be ahead of the game ,
#25
as a left handed guy myself, i've been playing for about 11 years now and i've tried both left and right handed guitars, and i can honestly say that i definitely prefer right handed guitars over leftys, solely for the fact that there is so much more available.

the availability and wide selection of tones is the deciding factor for me here but ultimately, i would advise sitting him down with both a left handed and a right handed guitar and whichever one feels easier for him to use after trying both is going to be the one you want to get him.
#26
You're severely limiting your options as to what guitars you can buy if you play left-handed. Left-handed guitars are relatively rare as very few major manufacturers offer left-handed instruments. The vast majority of models in the guitar market are right-handed only. Not only that, but left-handed guitars are also more expensive than the right-handed equivalent purely because they're more rare, and not because they're better guitars.
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#27
Back again. Thanks for all the advice. I went to the pawn shop and got a cheap lefty, I already had a cheap yamaha righty at home. I have sat him down with both for a few days to just get the feel of them. Now when he is in his room, I will peak in, and I see him with the lefty. He does try the righty, but I feel its just to make me happy that he tried it. When he doesnt know Im looking, he grabs the lefty.. What should I do? Let it be natural? Or force the righty??
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