#1
My tab says I need to simultaneously bend two strings up one whole step during the solo:

second string 5th fret and third string 7th fret.

The only way I can think of is using my index and ring fingers but the two strings separate or come closer together as I try to bend...it's impossible to bend them equally. How are you supposed to do a bend like this two frets apart? Thanks...Patrick
#2
Tried this bend just now, the way you described it is basically how a lot of people bend it (with ring and index fingers).
I would add my middle finger to go behind the ring finger on string 3, so it has more support.

Now, this is my mentality... When you gotta bend two strings for the same interval, don't think of the fingers holding the strings down as separate entities. If you do, then you are basically thinking about multiple things at once. And of course, when you think about multiple things at once, you don't normally do a good job at either. So you won't bend the strings correctly and it will sound terrible (duh ).
The fingers doing the bend must move in unison, at the same speed and stopping at the same time, with a minimal window of mistake. So think of your fingers as one entity and not multiple, and when bending, turn them into a rigid "claw" of sorts that will move together. For the duration of the bend, they go up all as one - like when you make a fist, you clench your fingers all together, instead of folding them one by one. This is also why I would add the middle finger behind the ring, since it makes a physical connection between the index and ring and it's easier to imagine them as one object when they're literally together. Move them all together and do not worry about separate, individual fingers, it should be easier to achieve such bends.

Hope this helps
#3
I think you might be looking at the tab wrong. It might just be a unison bend, which would mean you just bend the D (7th fret G string) up a whole step and leave the E as it is. If you actually do have to bend both, it'll just take some practice. Try bending the D first and then slowly bend the E up while holding the D. Make sure you have your thumb over the neck so you have more control.
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#4
^ +1
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#5
Thank you everyone so far. You know...I thought I'm supposed to bend both strings simultaneously, but perhaps I'm only supposed to bend one string? Looking closely, there seems to be a difference where the 'bend' arrow is originating from. Here is the tab...it's part of the solo in I Need To Know by Tom Petty:
Attachments:
P1100031 solo bends.jpg
#6
That is a unison bend to an E on the 3rd string.
Listen to it and you'll hear it.
Also, if you look at the notation above you see that they are both hitting the same note.
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#7
yeah
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#8
Thanks to everyone...

Am I right that the arrows that turn upwards at a right angle don't indicate a bend...they just indicate that the double stop is being played while the previous bend is still being held?
#9
Quote by black_strat22
Thanks to everyone...

Am I right that the arrows that turn upwards at a right angle don't indicate a bend...they just indicate that the double stop is being played while the previous bend is still being held?


Yup, you hold the bend and pick it as many times as the tab suggests.
#10
Thanks!

I have Guitar For Dummies (an old edition) and it explains playing single notes during held bends, but I couldn't find mention of playing double stops during a held bend.
#11
I would think that with a double stop bend, you'd see a pair of stacked notes ascending to a pair of stacked notes. For example @7th fret, 3rd & 4th strings, D over A bending both to E over B at the same fret. It takes a bit less strength if you're working around the 12th fret.

Richard Thompson, (formerly of Fairport Convention), often uses multi-string bends. He's kind of notorious for it, I'm sure there are many others.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Nov 16, 2013,