#1
Yes I know there is a thread already but this isn't specifically about just buying one

Well, it finally happened...the old hand-me down Yamaha which I'd been using for well on 5-6 years (intermittently) has given up the ghost. Actually it's not completely unusable, just that the action has gotten too high to play comfortably.

So I'm going to be buying a new acoustic/classical guitar! Though I'm not quite sure what to look for in one, hence this thread.

So far I've found a budget one at about $200 which sounds decent, and a more expensive one that is $550, sounds about the same but has WAY less action that the other one, allowing for easier playing. Is it normal to pay so much more for smoother playing?

My budget's around $500 or so (preferably lower), looking for nylon strings without a pickup. Not that choosy about sound. Right now I'm thinking of just getting something basic and buying another one when I figure out more about what I am looking for.

Also, I've heard about solid body electrical classical guitars. What are those like? Can I use both steel and nylon strings for those?

Any help would be greatly appreciated!
#2
I just bought a used Takamine. (sorry, can't remember the model) It's a solid-top instrument that normally retails for about 300 bucks. I got it for 120. Put some new strings on it and it's fine.
Before I bought the used one, I went out to GC and looked over a bunch... I didn't want to pay over 300. Lots of nice instruments... You just have to play 'em.
The Yamaha laminated-top number, the CG122, sells for about 200 bucks. It's not bad. They have a solid top model that sells for just short of 300.
I found a couple in my price range that were very bass-heavy, and others that I didn't like the neck... All preference items.
You should ideally look for a solid-top guitar that feels good and has a balanced tone.
#3
What's the difference between a solid-top and...whatever is not a solid top?

Yeah I'll definitely try any guitar before I buy.
#4
a solid top guitar has a solid top and laminate sides. solid wood vibrates more freely, so solid wood is better for tone in most cases. an all solid guitar usually trumps and all laminate or solid top guitar for resonance and sometimes volume and tone.

that being said, not all all-laminate guitars are the same. yamaha turns out a pleasing lower cost guitar, and i like cordobas.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
Last edited by patticake at Nov 15, 2013,
#5
Quote by Berabouman
...[ ].....So far I've found a budget one at about $200 which sounds decent, and a more expensive one that is $550, sounds about the same but has WAY less action that the other one, allowing for easier playing. Is it normal to pay so much more for smoother playing?
Not really. The action is solely dependent on the angle the neck is set, and correct adjustment of the saddle. You can get some pretty darn cheap guitars, to play pretty darn well.

It behooves a dealer not to bother adjusting the action correctly on his less expensive models. Since a new comer, (pretty much like yourself), will come in a think that you have to pay 300 bucks more for a guitar that plays well. The truth is, many inexpensive guitars can be setup to play as well as more expensive instruments. BUT, you need be heedful of how much string saddle is showing over the bridge proper. If there's not much white showing, and the action is high,don't walk, run away from it.

Best bet is this; take somebody with you that actually knows what they're doing, not someone who merely thinks they do.

A guitar's fretwork also factors into its absolute ability to play well with a very low action. With that said, the differential would perhaps only be a few thousandths of an inch, certainly not enough to prevent you from being able to play comfortably.


Quote by Berabouman
Also, I've heard about solid body electrical classical guitars. What are those like? Can I use both steel and nylon strings for those?

Any help would be greatly appreciated!
C'mon man, if you put steel strings on a guitar, you can in no way, still consider it a classical guitar. If fact, nylon strings barely qualify. they used to string 'em with the same thing as violins, cat gut.... (This of is course, before the SPCA came into its own).
Last edited by Captaincranky at Nov 15, 2013,
#6
I just bought a Tak-G Elect./acoustic with a built in tuner about 3 months ago for about $349 new, fine sounding guitar.
#7
My neighbor has a La Patrie that sounds really nice. Its all solid and he paid around $450 cad.

Have fun looking.
#8
BUT, you need be heedful of how much string saddle is showing over the bridge proper.


Ok, I'm not very sure of what you mean here. I know what the bridge and string saddle are, but what do you mean about how much it's showing over?

Best bet is this; take somebody with you that actually knows what they're doing, not someone who merely thinks they do.


Unfortunately I don't have many guitar-savvy friends.
#9
Quote by Berabouman
Ok, I'm not very sure of what you mean here. I know what the bridge and string saddle are, but what do you mean about how much it's showing over?
Exactly what it says. There should be a fairly good amount of the saddle showing above the wooden bridge. At least 1/8", possibly a bit more. It is a bit of a judgement call. Many makers ship with the action fairly high. If the neck of the guitar is set correctly, accordingly, there should be a lot of saddle above the bridge.

Quote by Berabouman
Unfortunately I don't have many guitar-savvy friends.

Yeah, me either.

Here's a good guide for setup: http://thbecker.net/guitar_playing/guitars_and_setup/setup_page_01.html This is for steel string acoustics, so it will give you the principles of setup, but the exact measurements won't apply to a nylon strung guitar.

Since it seems you're unfamiliar with setup, are you sure your Yamaha can't be adjusted to play better?
Last edited by Captaincranky at Nov 15, 2013,